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Thread: Leonard Cohen dead at 82

  1. #31
    czb
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    HOW can you put kelly clarkson in the same sentence as leonard or bob dylan, nobel laureate??!!

    next you'll be saying that leann covered leonard in concert.
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^
    oh, I hate some of those covers, I'm just saying that their covers made songs popular that people didn't like when sung by Dylan or cohen
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Speaking of The Future, how freaky is it that Cohen dies one day after Trump is elected, and these are (part of) the lyrics to "The Future":

    I've seen the future, brother:
    it is murder.

    Things are going to slide, slide in all directions
    Won't be nothing
    Nothing you can measure anymore
    The blizzard, the blizzard of the world
    has crossed the threshold
    and it has overturned
    the order of the soul
    When they said REPENT REPENT
    I wonder what they meant
    Didn't they also say they found something in Nostradamus' notes that could be about Trump's election?
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    He died on Monday. They waited a few days to announce his death. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leonard_Cohen

    "Cohen died on November 7, 2016 at the age of 82 at his home in Los Angeles; cancer was a contributing cause.[147][148][149] His death was announced on November 10.[150] His funeral was held on November 10, 2016 in Montreal, at a cemetery on Mount Royal, his congregation Shaar Hashomayim confirmed. As was his wish, Cohen was laid to rest with a Jewish rite in a family"

  5. #35
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^^
    is it weird the first thing i thought was i'm kind of glad he never had to find out trump won?
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    Nah, you weren't the only one thinking it.

  7. #37
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    his lyrics really got me, god i wish i had someone who could put into writing their passion and love for me. something so sexy about how he conveyed love to whomever he wrote his songs about.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    ^^^^
    is it weird the first thing i thought was i'm kind of glad he never had to find out trump won?
    i was thinking the same thing. The Future seems eerily apt.

  9. #39
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    The Opinion Pages | OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR

    My Friend Leonard Cohen: Darkness and Praise

    By LEON WIESELTIER
    NOV. 14, 2016



    CreditBrian Rasic/Getty Images
    Leonard Cohen in 2013.

    “Dear Uncle Leonard,” the email from the boy began. “Did anything inspire you to create ‘Hallelujah’”? Later that same winter day the reply arrived: “I wanted to stand with those who clearly see G-d’s holy broken world for what it is, and still find the courage or the heart to praise it. You don’t always get what you want. You’re not always up for the challenge. But in this case — it was given to me. For which I am deeply grateful.”

    The question came from my son, who was preparing to present the most irresistible hymn of our time to his fifth-grade class and required a clarification about its meaning. The answer came from the author of the song, who was for 25 years my precious friend and comrade of the spirit. Leonard Cohen was the most beautiful man I have ever known.

    His company was quickening in every way. The elegance and the seductiveness were the least of it. The example of his poise was overwhelming, more an achievement than a disposition, and much more than an affair of style.

    He lived in a weather of wisdom, which he created by seeking it rather than by finding it. He swam in beauty, because in its transience he aspired to discern a glimpse of eternity: There was always a trace of philosophy in his sensuality. He managed to combine a sense of absurdity with a sense of significance, a genuine feat. He was hospitable and strict, sweet and deep, humble and grand, probing and tender, a friend of melancholy but an enemy of gloom, a voluptuary with religion, a renegade enamored of tradition.

    Leonard was, above all, in his music and in his poems and in his tone of life, the lyrical advocate of the finite and the flawed. As he wrote to my son, who was mercifully too young to understand, he was possessed by a lasting sensation of brokenness. He was broken, love was broken, the world was broken.

    But “Famous Blue Raincoat” notwithstanding, this was not the usual literary abjection, or any sort of bargain-basement Baudelaireanism. Leonard’s reputation for bleakness is very imprecise. His work documents a long and successful war with despair. “I greet you from the other side of sorrow and despair/ With a love so vast and shattered it will reach you everywhere.” The shattering of love has the effect of proliferating it.

    Leonard had an unusual inflection for darkness: He found in it an occasion for uplift. His work is animated by a laudatory impulse, an unexpected and profoundly moving hunger to praise the world in full view of it. His attitude of acceptance was not founded on anything as cheap as happiness.

    Leonard sang always as a sinner. He refused to describe sin as a failure or a disqualification. Sin was a condition of creatureliness, and his feeling for our creatureliness was boundless. “Even though it all went wrong/ I’ll stand before the Lord of song/ With nothing on my tongue but Hallelujah!”

    The singer’s faults do not expel him from the divine presence. Instead they confer a mortal integrity upon his exclamation of praise. He is the inadequate man, the lowly man, the hurt man who has given hurt, insisting modestly but stubbornly (except in “I’m Your Man,” when he merrily mocked himself) upon his right to a sacred exaltation.

    Leonard wrote and sung often about God, but I am not sure what he meant by it. Whatever it was, it inspired “If It Be Your Will,” his most exquisite song. He sought recognition for his fallenness, not rescue from it. “There is a crack in everything. That’s how the light gets in.” He once told an interviewer that those words were the closest he came to a credo. The teaching could not be more plain: fix the crack, lose the light.

    All this gave Leonard’s laughter an uncommon credibility. He put punch lines into some of his most lugubrious songs. He delighted in expressing serious notions in comically homely ways. (On ephemerality, from an unreleased early version of a song: “They oughta hand the night a ticket/ for speeding. It’s a crime.”) We laughed all the time. At the small wooden table in his kitchen the jokes flew, usually as he prepared a meal. While he was genuinely in earnest about the pursuit of truth, Leonard had a supremely unsanctimonious temperament. Whether or not darkness was to be relieved by light, it was to be relieved by lightness. Before Passover, which commemorates the biblical exodus, he sent this: “Dear bro, happy Pesach. I miss Egypt! Love and blessings, Eliezer.” Before Shavuot, which commemorates the giving of the Torah in the desert, he sent this: “Dear bro, See you at Sinai. I’ll be wearing headphones! Love and blessings, Eliezer.” The laughter of the disabused was yet another of his gifts.

    Eliezer was his Hebrew name. We sometimes read and studied together, Lorca and midrash and Eluard and Buddhist scriptures and Cavafy. We could get quite Talmudic, especially with wine. In Judaism there is a custom to honor the dead by pondering a text in their memory. Here, in memory of Eliezer ben Nisan ha’Cohen, is a passage on frivolity by a great rabbi in Prague at the end of the 16th century. “Man was born for toil, since his perfection is always being actualized but is never actual,” he observed in an essay on frivolity. “And insofar as he attains perfection, something is missing in him.

    In such a being, perfection is a shortcoming and a lack.” Leonard Cohen was the poet laureate of the lack, the psalmist of the privation, who made imperfection gorgeous.

    Correction: November 14, 2016
    An earlier version of this essay rendered Leonard Cohen’s Hebrew name incorrectly. It is Eliezer ben Nisan ha’Cohen, not Eliezer ben Natan ha’Cohen. The essay also incorrectly rendered the title of a Cohen song. It is “I’m Your Man,” not “I’m in Your Man.”

    Leon Wieseltier is the Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy at the Brookings Institution and the author of “Kaddish.”

    Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook and Twitter (@NYTopinion), and sign up for the Opinion Today newsletter.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/14/op...e-iphone-share


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    Leonard Cohen died after fall at his Los Angeles home




    Manager says death was ‘sudden, unexpected and peaceful’, revealing singer-songwriter, 82, died in his sleep after falling in the middle of the night


    Leonard Cohen died in his sleep after a fall at his home in Los Angeles, his manager has said.The Canadian singer-songwriter died on 7 November at the age of 82. His death was confirmed a few days later in an announcement on his official Facebook page, which gave no details of the circumstances.



    On Wednesday, Cohen’s manager, Robert Kory, said his death was unexpected.
    “Leonard Cohen died during his sleep following a fall in the middle of the night on 7 November,” Kory said. “The death was sudden, unexpected and peaceful.”


    Leonard Cohen – he knew things about life, and if you listened you could learn


    The statement said Cohen is survived by his children, Adam and Lorca, and his three grandchildren, Cassius, Viva and Lyon.

    Earlier this week, Adam Cohen said his father’s funeral had taken place in his home city of Montreal.

    “My sister and I just buried my father in Montreal. With only immediate family and a few lifelong friends present, he was lowered into the ground in an unadorned pine box, next to his mother and father. Exactly as he’d asked,” he wrote on Facebook.


    “Thank you for your kind messages, for the outpouring of sympathy and for your love of my father.”

    A memorial is due to take place in LA at a later date.

    Cohen had released his 14th album, You Want It Darker, in October, to five-star reviews.
    In an interview that month, Cohen said he was “ready to die”. He told the New Yorker: “I am ready to die. I hope it’s not too uncomfortable. That’s about it for me.”

    In the same interview, he said he had a vault of unpublished poems and unfinished lyrics to finish and record or publish. “The big change is the proximity to death. I am a tidy kind of guy.

    “I like to tie up the strings if I can. If I can’t, that’s OK. But my natural thrust is to finish things that I’ve begun.”


    https://www.theguardian.com/music/2016/nov/17/leonard-cohen-died-fall-home-sleep-night





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