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Thread: "Foxy Knoxy" Amanda Knox gets $4m book deal from HarperCollins

  1. #61
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    ^^^
    then maybe they should write a book too.
    I know what you meant but I think you'll find Meredith Kercher can't write a book.

    There are several points here but since they are writing from the point of view that they didn't do it and it is all a head-scratching mystery, the book will be all about 'it was so unfair being in prison, blah, but at least I learnt Italian.' What can they say about the murder? Nothing.

    What happened to the prosecution appealing the acquittals anyway?

  2. #62
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    Appealing slander conviction, basically it says "wah wah the police made me say it"

    http://m.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/f...d&type=article
    Amanda Knox appeals against slander conviction in Meredith Kercher case
    American student jailed but later cleared of Briton's murder in Italy says police made her wrongly implicate Patrick Lumumba

    Amanda Knox has launched a court bid to completely clear her name in the Meredith Kercher case. She won her appeal against a murder charge but remains convicted of slander against another former suspect. Photograph: Reuters
    Reuters
    guardian.co.uk, Tue 7 Feb 2012 03.11 GMT
    Amanda Knox, the American woman cleared in October 2011 of murder by an Italian court, has asked an appeals court there to overturn her slander conviction as well.
    Knox family spokesman David Marriott said it was not immediately clear when the appeals court, based in Perugia, would consider the appeal or issue a ruling.

    He said the appeal was filed with the court on Monday morning by Italian lawyers for Knox, who remains in the US.
    The slander conviction stems from statements Knox made under police questioning in 2007 that falsely implicated bar owner Patrick Lumumba in the murder of her British housemate, Meredith Kercher.

    Knox, 24, later told the court she was pressured by police during a lengthy interrogation to accuse Lumumba.

    Lumumba was arrested in Kercher's murder and jailed for two weeks but ultimately cleared of involvement. He sued Knox for slander.
    An Italian court in October overturned Knox's 2009 conviction for murdering Kercher, 21, a crime prosecutors said was committed during a drug-fuelled sexual assault.

    Also cleared was Knox's boyfriend, Raffaele Sollecito, leaving Ivorian drifter Rudy Guede as the only person convicted in a killing that investigators believe was carried out by more than one person.

    Kercher's half-naked body was found with more than 40 stab wounds and a deep gash to the throat in the apartment she shared with Knox in Perugia.

    Knox, a former University of Washington student, is living in Seattle where she has largely avoided the public eye.

  3. #63
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
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    Geez, quit pushing your luck. Kinda like Casey Anthony appealing the "lying to the police" convictions.

    I also wasn't aware she had only been with her boyfriend for a week when the murder occurred.
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  4. #64
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    it gets better....
    March 19, 2012 10:23 AM




    Amanda Knox's parents to go on trial in Perugia

    By Doug Longhini Topics Daily Blotter Amanda Knox shortly after her arrival in Seattle, Wash. on Oct. 4, 2011, one day after she was acquitted of murder and freed from an Italian prison.
    (Credit: Kevin Casey/AFP/Getty Images)
    (CBS) At the end of March, Amanda Knox's parents will go on trial in Italy. Yes, you are reading that correctly - her parents.

    Pictures: Amanda Knox Appeal
    Pictures: Amanda Knox Personal Photos
    Knox, herself, is the Seattle student who spent four years in prison for a murder an Italian court found her innocent of last October. In 2009, Amanda Knox was convicted of murdering British student Meredith Kercher in Perugia, Italy. Last year, an Italian Appeals Court freed Knox ruling her earlier conviction "was not corroborated by any objective element of evidence."
    Though their daughter may be out of the slammer, Amanda's parents, Edda Mellas and Curt Knox, could now find themselves sentenced to prison. In 2009, they were charged with criminal defamation in Perugia. Eight Perugia police officers claimed they were libeled when Amanda's parents told a British newspaper that their daughter was physically abused during a police interrogation. If convicted, Edda Mellas and Curt Knox could be sentenced to up to three years in prison in Italy and fined (neither parent plans to appear at the trial, nor does Amanda Knox, and there is not extradition for criminal defamation).

    The parents' trial will start March 30th in Perugia; but perhaps Perugia - at least when it comes to Knox-related legal matters - would be better named Paranomia. Last November, Gian Antonio Stella, writing in Milan's Corriere della Sera newspaper, bitingly compared Italy to the islands depicted in the 1901 utopian novel, Riallardo, the Archipelago of Exiles. The fictional isles of the Riallardo archipelago, Stella wrote, "Offered asylum to the misguided."
    Stella's article mentioned one particular chain of islands that were cut off from the rest of the world by a permanent ring of dense fog. The novel said the inhabitants were "exiled for some craze they had developed on the subject of law". These isolated islands were named Paranomia. In the book, one of Paranomia's islands had its own combined prosecutor-judges, they were called Justitiomaniacs, "who were not happy unless engaged in dealing out justice." Endless trials proved a constant source of merriment. But, there was always the fear that they would run out of "real flesh-and-blood criminals to try, cases with a vein of tragedy running through them."
    Amanda Knox's father, Curt Knox, left, talks to reporters as her mother, Edda Mellas, looks on at right, Oct. 4, 2011, in Seattle.
    (Credit: AP/Ted S. Warren)
    The solution for Paranomia: prosecute the innocent. After all, "where lay the talent or ability," asks the novel, in finding the guilty, guilty? In Paranomia, "there was something of true genius in convicting an innocent man and getting his friends to feel there was something wrong about him."

    Edda Mellas and Curt Knox face a prosecution that could be straight out of old fantasy novel. Amanda's parents are charged under Articolo 368 Codice Penale, Libro Secondo, Titilo III. It defines the various degrees of criminal slander under Italian law.



    In June 2008, Knox's parents did an interview with London Sunday Times correspondent John Follain. They told Follain what their daughter had told them; namely that during Amanda Knox's interrogation by Perugia police in November 2007, she was abused both physically and verbally and that she was hit in the back of the head.
    This wasn't a scoop for either Follain or the Sunday Times. Seven months earlier, the London Daily Telegraph had first reported Amanda Knox's police brutality charges. There was no comment from the Perugia police in either story. In fact, Perugia police waited until February 2009 to publicly deny Amanda Knox's brutality charges. So as of June 2008, Curt Knox and Edda Mellas had reason to believe their daughter's version of events. And that could be a critical fact under Italian law and at their upcoming trial.

    The Italian Supreme Court has consistently ruled, as recently as January 25th, that criminal slander only happens when "the person making the false accusation has acted intentionally and with the awareness and with the certainty of the innocence of the accused." Cutting through the legalese, slander in Italy is when you are accusing a person of doing something you know, for certain, they didn't do. But saying it publicly, anyway.



    Edda Mellas, mother of Amanda Knox (insert), speaks to journalists in a Perugia, Italy courtroom, June 20, 2009.
    (Credit: AP Photo/Stefano Medici)


    So why are Curt Knox and Edda Mellas being prosecuted? Perugia police could have, and by Italian law should have, recorded Amanda Knox's interrogation. But so far, no recording has surfaced. So how can anyone say, with certainty, that the police brutality didn't happen? And conversely, how could Curt Knox and Edda Mellas know, with certainty, that the Perugia police are telling the truth when the cops say they didn't brutalize their daughter during the interrogation in 2007? And then add in the fact that Perugia police waited two years to publicly refute the charges (in sworn testimony in February 2009 during Amanda Knox's first trial).
    Apparently, none of this would have proved a problem in fictional Paranomia. Given its Alice in Wonderland style of jurisprudence, the island's solution would have been both obvious and alarming. The novel says the Justitiomaniacs, "rather preferred an innocent man for their experiments in justice."
    Last year, back in real-life Perugia, a lawyer told the judge and jury deciding Amanda Knox's fate that the American honor student from Seattle was "a satanic, diabolic, she-devil given to borderline behavior." Not surprisingly, the lawyer offered no proof for his claims. It raises the question; could that kind of outburst be considered slander in Italy?

    Stealing a line from Corriere della Sera's Gian Antonio Stella: "That would be in a serious country, not Paranomia."
    This story was reported by CBS News' "48 Hours Mystery" producer Doug Longhini, who has covered the Amanda Knox case for several years.

    Complete coverage of Amanda Knox on Crimesider
    Needless to say that you'll gather from the "style" (ie ridicule) that this is an american article.
    Mar 14, 2012 10:14am
    Amanda Knox’s Former Boyfriend to Visit Seattle

    Email 11 Smaller Font Text Larger Text | Print

    A reunion between Amanda Knox and her former boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito, the man with whom she spent four years in an Italian prison on murder charges, could happen as early as this week.
    Sollecito, 27, will be in Knox’s hometown of Seattle for a job interview this Friday with an Eastside tech company, said to be computer giant Microsoft, ABC News has learned.
    While it remains unclear whether Sollecito has made plans to see Knox, 24, the reunion would mark the first time the two have seen each other since they were freed from a prison outside Perugia, Italy, last October.
    The romance between Sollecito, an Italian, and Knox was cut short when both were arrested in November 2007 for the stabbing death of Knox’s 21 year-old British college roommate, Meredith Kercher. They were convicted of the murder in 2009 and Knox was sentenced to 26 years in prison while Sollecito got 25 years.
    Their sentences and convictions were overturned last year and both were freed from prison. Italian prosecutors are trying to have the conviction reinstated.
    Both Sollecito and Knox are seeing other people these days. Sollecito is dating an Italian volleyball player, while Knox is seeing James Terrano, a friend from college.
    The last moments together were emotional for Knox and Sollecito as well as for their families.
    Moments after the verdict freeing them, Knox’s father Curt Knox went over to Franceso Sollecito, Raffaele’s father, and extended an open invitation for them to visit the Knoxes in Seattle.
    Knox and Sollecito haven’t seen each other since they left court for the last time in a car after the judge set them free. As the vehicle took them back to prison for the paperwork to release them, an overwhelmed Knox was crying, her father told ABC News after the acquittal. Her tears prompted Sollecito to ask her, “Why are you crying? We’re free!”
    Knox returned to Seattle after her release where she has resumed attending college and working to complete a book about her trial and imprisonment in Italy. Knox signed a $4 million deal with HarperCollins in February for the still-untitled book, expected to be released in early 2013.
    Sollecito, an IT student whom Knox met while in Italy as an exchange student, finished his computer science degree in prison.
    Reports say that Sollecito also plans to meet with his Seattle-based book agent while in the U.S. He had planned to meet with supporters at a residence near Bellevue, Wash., but sources tell ABC News that meeting has been cancelled.
    A third person, Rudy Guede, was convicted of taking part in the murder in a separate trial and is serving a 16-year sentence.


    SHOWS: Good Morning America
    I guess that after you've killed someone with your boy/girlfriend all other relationship are somewhat lacking....

  5. #65
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    ^ Blood ties?

  6. #66
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    Ok maybe I am missing something, I didnt follow this case too closely, But what I did read or see on it, seemed that she and her bf were innocent.
    Id also like to add, how do you plan a murder and execute it in a week? She had just started dating that guy, doesnt even seem somewhat plausible to me.
    Slutty American girl killer sounds convenient to me.
    MmeVertigina likes this.
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  7. #67
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mistify View Post
    Ok maybe I am missing something, I didnt follow this case too closely, But what I did read or see on it, seemed that she and her bf were innocent.
    Id also like to add, how do you plan a murder and execute it in a week? She had just started dating that guy, doesnt even seem somewhat plausible to me.
    Slutty American girl killer sounds convenient to me.
    Um, you can execute a murder in a minute. It's called loss of control. They were lovers for a week. That gives them plenty of time to help each other out.

  8. #68
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    seriously, the italians just need to give it up already. going after the parents is kust retarded. surely they have better things to do with their time?
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    seriously, the italians just need to give it up already. going after the parents is kust retarded. surely they have better things to do with their time?
    and money! absolutely ridiculous.
    Did you know that every time a parent gives in to their kid's whines and buys them candy at the checkout lane, a kitten gets diabetes?-Dlisted
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  10. #70
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    Well, it's not that ridiculous if it is a miscarriage of justice unless that doesn't matter. (I'm talking about the appeal against the acquittals. The stuff about the parents could be the next best option like the OJ conviction.)

  11. #71
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    The victim's father is bringing out a book as well:

    John Kercher: The judge's verdict was a bombshell... if Amanda Knox hadn't killed my Meredith, who had?


    By John Kercher

    PUBLISHED: 21:59, 21 April 2012 | UPDATED: 00:14, 22 April 2012

    In the second part of his heart-rending story, the father of Meredith Kercher, the British 21-year-old killed while studying in Italy, describes his family's ordeal as two fellow students stand trial for her murder...
    The main trial of Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito, the students accused of my daughter Meredith’s murder, started in 2009. Rudy Guede, a drifter of Ivory Coast descent, had already been convicted of a role in the killing, which had taken place two years earlier; now Knox and Sollecito were to face a six-man jury in Perugia, Italy.
    Part of me wanted to be there, but we knew the trial would be lengthy and we would be unable to understand completely because of the language barrier. At some point, we would be required to return, testify and relive the night of Meredith’s death, but in the meantime, we followed the trial from afar.

    Fond memories: Meredith enjoying a family trip to the seaside when she ten

    When the police had kicked down the door of my daughter’s bedroom in Perugia, they were met with a terrible sight: blood on the floor and walls, Meredith’s foot protruding from beneath a duvet.
    The head of homicide, Monica Napoleone, was horrified at the wounds, especially the savage cut to the throat. Meredith had sustained 47 cuts and bruises, which implied that more than one person had been involved in her killing.
    Now, much hinged on DNA and other forensic evidence. The prosecution case also drew on evidence that a supposed break-in had been staged, and also on the conflicting alibis of Knox and Sollecito, which had changed several times.
    Meredith, right, with her sister Stephanie at her graduation in Portsmouth

    The defence lawyers, meanwhile, argued that contamination could have taken place – on the alleged murder weapon and on Meredith’s bra clasp. They were to pursue this point throughout the trial and the later appeal process as well.
    In London, I found the information all quite confusing. It seemed that as soon as the court was presented with one version of events, another one would emerge.
    It was only after several months, in the summer of 2009, that we were told our presence was required and I flew to Perugia with Arline, my former wife, and Stephanie, Meredith’s sister.
    There was much dispute, as we sat there, about the way in which Meredith had died; about which knife was used, which position she had been in, whether or not she had fought her attacker.
    It was incredibly hard to listen to this graphic breakdown of the last moments of Meredith’s life, and I tried to keep myself detached from the awful details. I reined myself in from imagining it too deeply. Soon after, we left. There was nothing more we could do in Perugia, where my daughter had gone to die.
    Throughout the trial, pressure from America had mounted. It began to feel as if some of Knox’s supporters had created a groundswell of noise and opinion. Meanwhile, my family and I, still upset that the media frenzy was focusing on Knox, felt as if we were a tiny, quiet voice crying out in the wilderness.
    I thought the case was not being fully and accurately reported in America, and that people there were not fully aware of all of the evidence that had been presented in court.
    John Q. Kelly, a respected New York lawyer, appeared on the Larry King show saying: ‘There’s no forensic evidence, there’s no physical evidence. There’s no substantive evidence against Amanda.’
    I was astounded. In fact, the prosecution had presented compelling evidence that Knox’s footprints, mixed with Meredith’s blood, had been found in the hallway outside Meredith’s room. And her footprint had been found in the room of Italian housemate Filomena Romanelli, where the prosecution had said a burglary had been staged. Kelly also seemed to be oblivious to the fact that Knox’s DNA had been found mixed with Meredith’s in three separate locations in the bathroom.
    As the accusations and insults were traded, I was becoming increasingly upset at the way Knox had been accorded almost minor celebrity status throughout her time in prison. As ever, Sollecito had been sidelined by the media and seemed to have been sentenced to anonymity – but the appetite for more stories focusing on Knox seemed insatiable.

    Tears in court: Amanda Knox after being acquitted last year

    It was December 4, 2009, when we returned to Italy for the verdict. The trial of Knox and Sollecito was finally over but we were told the jury were still deliberating, and that they might not reach a conclusion until the following morning. So we sat as a family in the entrance to the hotel dining room, waiting. Then, approaching midnight, our lawyer’s mobile phone began to ring. ‘That’s it,’ he said.
    Eyeing each other silently, we climbed into the police cars outside.We were placed to the rear of the court near the door, an official interpreter at our side.
    From where we were sitting, the judge looked a million miles away, and when he began speaking, it was in such a soft voice that even if I had understood Italian, I doubt I would have heard.
    I looked towards Knox and Sollecito: gone was the confidence and smile that Knox had previously displayed. Then, as Judge Massei delivered his pronouncement, I watched her collapsing forward. I saw her parents’ look of disbelief.
    Still, I had no idea what this meant. Had Knox pitched forward in relief, or was it devastation? Had she and Sollecito been released? Would the long wait for justice go on even longer?
    Our interpreter turned to us, and it was only then that I understood what had happened. They had been found guilty of Meredith’s murder. Knox had been sentenced to 26 years in prison, Sollecito had been given 25 years.
    Knox was crying and crumpled, and even though I believed justice had been done, it was not a pleasant sight. I did not feel any elation. There was no pandemonium in the court, just a heavy silence, lawyers talking to each other quietly.
    Knox disappeared then Sollecito followed, with a bewildered expression on his face. The whole process of the verdict had lasted less than ten minutes.


    Two years of wondering what was going to happen had reached some kind of conclusion, and yet it did not feel as if we had come to the end of any road, only that the road went on and on. Already, I knew that appeals were going to follow. The verdict was only another step on that long, lonely road. It started with Meredith’s murder, but it would not end.
    We did not anticipate that it would be almost two years before the result of the appeals against the convictions would be announced. Like the initial trial, the appeals dragged on for months while the dark tunnel between my family and our ability to grieve in peace for Meredith became ever longer. Our presence in Perugia was not required; it was simply a process we would have to endure. There was nothing we could do but wait.
    Finally, in October last year, we were asked to return for the verdict. Having already been through a stroke, I thought it would have been too stressful for me to travel and did not want to risk it. All the same, Arline, my former wife, and our children Stephanie and Lyle flew out.
    With the case being at the heart of such a circus, and with politicians having waded into an arena where they surely did not belong, the verdict was going to be shown live on an internet news channel. I sat in my kitchen with friends, awaiting the moment with unbearable tension.
    On the screen, I could see my family seated in the courtroom, and wished I could have been with them. Then, at last, Judge Claudio Pratillo Hellmann walked into the court and seemed nervous as he made his pronouncement. His words were being translated and the resounding word ‘guilty’ was heard.
    Perfect pose: Meredith enjoyed her ballet lessons from the age of six

    But we had all jumped the gun. The guilty verdict that we had all heard applied only to the wrongful accusation by Knox regarding bar owner Patrick Lumumba. She had been found guilty of attempting to pervert the course of justice by falsely accusing an innocent man of Meredith’s murder.
    Only afterwards did the real bombshell come. Knox and Sollecito were acquitted. They were being proclaimed innocent, the ‘truth’ about what had happened to my daughter was evaporating, their convictions were overturned, the sentence quashed – and they were to walk free.
    Hundreds of miles away, I sat stunned and open-mouthed. Around me, not one of my friends could believe what they had heard. At the most I had thought that perhaps there would be a reduction in the pair’s sentences. To hear they had been exonerated of any blame in Meredith’s death was staggering.
    Outside the court, the waiting crowd erupted in anger. As prosecutor Giuliano Mignini later said: ‘Perugia is a quiet town. The fact that people come to cry out “Shame” on the ruling, means something.’ Total strangers were coming up to Arline expressing sorrow and saying that they were ashamed to be Italian.
    Prosecutor Manuela Comodi responded with: ‘There is no question of a fresh investigation because, as far as we are concerned, Meredith was murdered by Amanda, Raffaele and Rudy Guede.’
    As far as the prosecution was concerned, it was a verdict that had let us all down – the prosecution, my family and Meredith herself.
    Amanda Knox left the court in Perugia crying, and these pictures were beamed all across the world. Of all the news programmes and articles that would be written, not one would pose the real question that should have been central to that day: if Knox and Sollecito did not murder Meredith, then who did?
    I am still uncertain if I can adequately put into words what my family’s feelings are at this course of events. It seemed to overturn so much evidence that had previously been presented in court, and the testimonies of so many expert witnesses.
    When Knox and Sollecito were behind bars, we had felt we had some form of closure on the case. As we have said, we would never want innocent people to be imprisoned. Yet now we are left thinking the world cared about justice for Knox and Sollecito, but what about justice for poor Meredith? She was the kindest and most caring person you could imagine, so why was her life taken from her so cruelly? What was the reason? Will we ever know?
    The prosecution is now preparing an appeal to the Supreme Court in Rome. This will be a review of all the documentary evidence in the case. The court might uphold the acquittal decision. Equally, it might uphold the original convictions. It could even request a retrial.
    What had once seemed simple will now, once more, become complicated, and now that Knox is back home in America, the situation might become political again. For if the Supreme Court upholds the convictions of the main trial, it could ask for her to be extradited from America back to Italy. An extradition treaty does exist between the two countries, although so far it has never been implemented.
    For my family and me, everything is in limbo. It could be a long time before any final decision is reached – but perhaps we will never know the truth.

    © Text and pictures: John Kercher 2012 Meredith: Our Daughter’s Murder And The Heartbreaking Quest For The Truth, by John Kercher, is published next Thursday by Hodder & Stoughton, priced £16.99. To order your copy for £13.99 inc p&p, call the Review Bookstore on 0843 382 1111 or go to MailShop.co.uk/books



    Read more: The judge's verdict was a bombshell... if Knox hadn't killed Meredith, who had? | Mail Online

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    Quote Originally Posted by rollo View Post
    When the police had kicked down the door of my daughter’s bedroom in Perugia, they were met with a terrible sight: blood on the floor and walls, Meredith’s foot protruding from beneath a duvet.
    The head of homicide, Monica Napoleone, was horrified at the wounds, especially the savage cut to the throat. Meredith had sustained 47 cuts and bruises, which implied that more than one person had been involved in her killing.
    Now, much hinged on DNA and other forensic evidence. The prosecution case also drew on evidence that a supposed break-in had been staged, and also on the conflicting alibis of Knox and Sollecito, which had changed several times.

    I thought the case was not being fully and accurately reported in America, and that people there were not fully aware of all of the evidence that had been presented in court.
    John Q. Kelly, a respected New York lawyer, appeared on the Larry King show saying: ‘There’s no forensic evidence, there’s no physical evidence. There’s no substantive evidence against Amanda.’
    I was astounded. In fact, the prosecution had presented compelling evidence that Knox’s footprints, mixed with Meredith’s blood, had been found in the hallway outside Meredith’s room. And her footprint had been found in the room of Italian housemate Filomena Romanelli, where the prosecution had said a burglary had been staged. Kelly also seemed to be oblivious to the fact that Knox’s DNA had been found mixed with Meredith’s in three separate locations in the bathroom.

    Outside the court, the waiting crowd erupted in anger. As prosecutor Giuliano Mignini later said: ‘Perugia is a quiet town. The fact that people come to cry out “Shame” on the ruling, means something.’ Total strangers were coming up to Arline expressing sorrow and saying that they were ashamed to be Italian.

    Of all the news programmes and articles that would be written, not one would pose the real question that should have been central to that day: if Knox and Sollecito did not murder Meredith, then who did?

    Yet now we are left thinking the world cared about justice for Knox and Sollecito, but what about justice for poor Meredith? She was the kindest and most caring person you could imagine, so why was her life taken from her so cruelly? What was the reason? Will we ever know?
    So many things here that no-one should ever have to go through.

    And he's right, the (US?) media was fanatical about "justice" for Knox, but what about Meredith?

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    I do think Meredith was all but forgotten in a rush to judgment. More focus needs to be on the victim. but media shoves them to the back.
    I don't know-nor,will we ever- what really happened. I disagree the US media whitewashed anything, since all networks were trying to outdo each other and presented every aspect of the crime over & over.
    The saddest fact is Meredith. Her life ended so swiftly. Her parents cannot recover, how could they? She never had a chance, whoever it was. Someday maybe the truth will all come out. I do not think we have a total picture at all.
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    I think I was on record in the other Amanda Knox thread as saying that I thought she was guilty. However, after re-reading information about the case, I think that the person who did this was Rudy Guede only, and not Knox or Sollecito.

    1. Guede's DNA was found inside and on Kercher's body. And on her bra, her shirt, and her handbag. He also left a bloody palmprint (Kercher's blood) on Kercher's pillow. Palmprint matched to Guede also.

    2. Kercher's and Sollecito's DNA was not found on any of these places. I have heard that people/police thought that Kercher and Sollecito had cleaned up the crime scene to remove evidence of their involvement. But it would seem to be a very tricky thing for two amateurs to remove it in such a way that only Guede's biological evidence is left behind.

    3. Guede had a history of criminal acts, such as breakins. Even being found with a knife in his possession after one breakin. As far as I can tell Knox and Sollecito had no criminal history.

    4. Guede had a story about how he was in the bathroom when Kercher was killed, but he couldn't explain why his bloody handprint would be on the pillow underneath her body. He also said he had left her fully dressed when he had not. He also claimed to not have had sex with her except that his DNA was inside her body.

    5. Guede had originally said Knox was not in the apartment at the time of the murder. Only on his appeal, did he state that there had been an argument between the two and that he had glanced out a window to see her leaving the apartment. The fact that he had already been caught lying about the physical circumstances of the crime scene would make claims about Knox pretty dubious.

    6. The supposed knife that Kercher was claimed to have used was found in Sollecito's apartment and had trace amounts of her DNA on it. However, there was no blood on the blade (or evidence of Kercher's DNA). The knife also appears to have been substantially too small to make the wounds that were found on Kercher. Moreover, an independent panel of experts found that the police had not followed international for the collection of DNA samples. They also found the police had failed to follow proper evidence collection procedures 54 times.

    In summary, what I'm saying is that I don't see any physical evidence implicating Knox/Sollecito in the sexual assault and murder. The overwhelming evidence points to Guede, who has already been convicted and sentenced and had his appeal rejected. The Italian court did reduce Guede's sentence by 14 years. He will probably get out in 2016, just four years from now.

  15. #75
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    47 stabs wounds and bruises are unlikely to have been made by one person and there are easier ways of subduing someone if only one person is involved.

    There was plenty of evidence about bleach and scrubbing the place clean, going early to a laundromat and Sollecito's knife collection. I don't really want to rehearse it all here but the prosecution failed rather than these poor hapless creatures were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

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