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Thread: Country Music Star Jason Aldean Dressed Up in Blackface for Halloween

  1. #31
    Elite Member NickiDrea's Avatar
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    And yet the media attempts to shove down everyone's throats that the Netherlands and places like it are bastions of equality and non-racism. Give me a break. It's inappropriate and the citizens just don't want to admit it because they like the whole blackface thing. The Netherlands actually has a lot of problems with racism that the media likes to minimize or completely ignore, and racial profiling has also become an issue there lately.
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  2. #32
    Elite Member BITTER's Avatar
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    The Dutch were harsher on their African slaves in the colonies than the English, Spanish, Portuguese or French. They also had one of the highest percentages of Jews sent to the death camps than most of the other European countries other than Poland. And Anne Frank's diary has helped to promote the Netherlands as a tolerant country who tried to protect their Jewish citizens, and they have been riding on that train for a while now.
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  3. #33
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    What's also quite disturbing, from what our ethnic Dutch friends (some from former Dutch colonies like my parents - Indonesia - but also people from Africa and Morocco, Turkey and Tunesia) tell us is that whenever they report racism, for instance at their workplace, committees that investigate such claims often are made up solely of white people!!!!! They also tell us that many Dutch explain racism as such: if an ethnic person perceives something as racism, but there was no racist intent, it is then deemed not racist. You know, as long as they claim they didn't MEAN to hurt feelings or to insult (as in "they meant no harm, they just expressed themselves clumsily") it is deemed not racist. Seriously.
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  4. #34
    Elite Member Mrs P's Avatar
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    Whilst I don't agree with black face, I have to say that I had two black friends that put on white face for their costume. No one thought anything of it. It was for that film White Chicks, which was considered OK.

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    Black Bastard is a BBQ brand that clearly took a wrong turn in the naming process. They thought: black is the colour, tough is the target; voila “Black Bastard”. The BBQ brand didn’t realise, however, that this name could be offensive outside of the Netherlands. Or, to an Anglo-Saxon expat, in this case.

    Old Amsterdam promotes ‘Black Bastard’ « Amsterdam Ad Blog

  6. #36
    Elite Member BITTER's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs P View Post
    Whilst I don't agree with black face, I have to say that I had two black friends that put on white face for their costume. No one thought anything of it. It was for that film White Chicks, which was considered OK.
    I hated that movie for that very reason...

    I think I may have mentioned that I saw this brand of toothpaste in Thailand and Singapore while on Navy shore leave.



    They have since changed the name to "DarLie", but the picture of the dark-skinned black man with exaggerated features remains.
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  7. #37
    Silver Member RobbieLee's Avatar
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    But didn't the Dutch government promise to the UN that they would try to make changes of their Sinterklaas tradition?

    From New York Times 28 August 2015

    U.N. Urges the Netherlands to Stop Portrayals of ‘Black Pete’ Character

    UNITED NATIONS — A United Nations committee has urged theNetherlands to get rid of Black Pete, a popular children’s character who has long been portrayed in early winter by white people in blackface makeup, usually with exaggerated red lips and gold hoops in his ears.
    The United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination wrote in a report issued Friday that “the character of Black Pete is sometimes portrayed in a manner that reflects negative stereotypes of people of African descent and is experienced by many people of African descent as a vestige of slavery.” It urged the Netherlands to “actively promote the elimination” of the racial stereotyping.
    The Dutch government responded by dismissing the idea of banning the character, but said it would promote a discussion, however “uncomfortable,” about racism.
    The Dutch are already reinventing the way they portray the controversial character, said Lodewijk Asscher, minister for social affairs and employment. “At the school of my own children, the Petes last year were orange,” he said.
    The figure of Black Pete — Zwarte Piet, in Dutch — accompanies St. Nicholas in early December. In parades in nearly every city and village, St. Nicholas — almost always a white man in a red suit — arrives on horseback, while Pete, his servant, walks alongside distributing candy.
    Black Pete is fodder in a pitched culture war within Dutch society, with antiracism activists denouncing the racial stereotypes and others insisting that the figure represents a harmless tradition, according to which Pete’s skin is darkened by soot from sliding down chimneys with gifts.
    Mr. Asscher spoke carefully, saying he understood the hurt feelings on both sides, including those who “fear they are losing their tradition.”
    “We must realize that changing an old tradition takes time,” the minister said.
    Social media users engaged in a debate more unruly than uncomfortable in response to the United Nations report. On Twitter, critics called the tradition a “disgrace.” Others described the United Nations report as an example of “racism against the Dutch.”
    The emotional debate around this one character is part of a broader argument about the limits of multiculturalism in Dutch society.
    Earlier this month, the upscale Dutch department store de Bijenkorf announced that its Pete characters would now wear gold makeup. In 2013, the official city parade in Amsterdam, the largest city in the Netherlands, featured Pete without golden earrings. City officials said the changes would continue until the character was no longer cast as a racial caricature and eventually resembled someone who had climbed through a chimney.
    In July, one of the country’s main daily newspapers, NRC Handelsblad,came under fire for using a racial epithet in a review of three books on racism in the United States.
    No, no, NOOO. Of course he's not the boy's father. Look at the turn ups on his jeans!

  8. #38
    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BITTER View Post
    I hated that movie for that very reason...

    I think I may have mentioned that I saw this brand of toothpaste in Thailand and Singapore while on Navy shore leave.



    They have since changed the name to "DarLie", but the picture of the dark-skinned black man with exaggerated features remains.
    We went to a very good butcher nearby who has the best meat at very sharp prices. We bought the meat and had just paid and were waiting for our change when on the counter we discovered a bottle of "Sambo Sauce" with indeed a charicature not unlike black pete. We were in total shock. Never went back to that store again, we'll pay a bit more for meat of lesser quality but this was just so wrong.


    Quote Originally Posted by RobbieLee View Post
    But didn't the Dutch government promise to the UN that they would try to make changes of their Sinterklaas tradition?

    From New York Times 28 August 2015

    U.N. Urges the Netherlands to Stop Portrayals of ‘Black Pete’ Character

    UNITED NATIONS — A United Nations committee has urged theNetherlands to get rid of Black Pete, a popular children’s character who has long been portrayed in early winter by white people in blackface makeup, usually with exaggerated red lips and gold hoops in his ears.
    The United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination wrote in a report issued Friday that “the character of Black Pete is sometimes portrayed in a manner that reflects negative stereotypes of people of African descent and is experienced by many people of African descent as a vestige of slavery.” It urged the Netherlands to “actively promote the elimination” of the racial stereotyping.
    The Dutch government responded by dismissing the idea of banning the character, but said it would promote a discussion, however “uncomfortable,” about racism.
    The Dutch are already reinventing the way they portray the controversial character, said Lodewijk Asscher, minister for social affairs and employment. “At the school of my own children, the Petes last year were orange,” he said.
    The figure of Black Pete — Zwarte Piet, in Dutch — accompanies St. Nicholas in early December. In parades in nearly every city and village, St. Nicholas — almost always a white man in a red suit — arrives on horseback, while Pete, his servant, walks alongside distributing candy.
    Black Pete is fodder in a pitched culture war within Dutch society, with antiracism activists denouncing the racial stereotypes and others insisting that the figure represents a harmless tradition, according to which Pete’s skin is darkened by soot from sliding down chimneys with gifts.
    Mr. Asscher spoke carefully, saying he understood the hurt feelings on both sides, including those who “fear they are losing their tradition.”
    “We must realize that changing an old tradition takes time,” the minister said.
    Social media users engaged in a debate more unruly than uncomfortable in response to the United Nations report. On Twitter, critics called the tradition a “disgrace.” Others described the United Nations report as an example of “racism against the Dutch.”
    The emotional debate around this one character is part of a broader argument about the limits of multiculturalism in Dutch society.
    Earlier this month, the upscale Dutch department store de Bijenkorf announced that its Pete characters would now wear gold makeup. In 2013, the official city parade in Amsterdam, the largest city in the Netherlands, featured Pete without golden earrings. City officials said the changes would continue until the character was no longer cast as a racial caricature and eventually resembled someone who had climbed through a chimney.
    In July, one of the country’s main daily newspapers, NRC Handelsblad,came under fire for using a racial epithet in a review of three books on racism in the United States.
    I believe the Dutch National Government is lax about implementing rules regarding these expressions of racism, which - in the context of the "tradition" that are the Stinterklaas festivities - are described as "innocent" and wrongly interpreted by people who take and express offence, simply because black pete is NOT a person of color, but turned black from sliding down the chimney to deliver presents (...........). They have instead shifted responsability to the city and town councils who can or cannot decide to change the way the petes are portrayed. Since, apparently, The Netherlands is a very racist country, even the slightest hints of change have resulted in protests, scuffles and even threatening of mayors and council members (........), most cities are also very slow in making changes. According to the Dutch, people should just "lighten up" which is quite a pun in this regard.
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  9. #39
    Silver Member RobbieLee's Avatar
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    "simply because black pete is NOT a person of color, but turned black from sliding down the chimney to deliver presents" I heard that excuse many times. Why is the make up and the costume clearly showing a caricature of a man of African descend? Honestly using that excuse/explanation is really a slap in the face.
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    No, no, NOOO. Of course he's not the boy's father. Look at the turn ups on his jeans!

  10. #40
    Elite Member ShimmeringGlow's Avatar
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    Santa's Black-Faced Helpers Are Under Fire In The Netherlands


    Updated December 8, 20146:49 PM ETPublished December 1, 20145:03 AM ET


    ELEANOR BEARDSLEY



    People line the road to greet Sinterklaas, the Dutch version of Santa Claus, and his "Swarte Piet" (Black Pete) sidekicks in Amsterdam on Nov. 17, 2013. In the past few years, Black Pete has come under fire. Some say it's a beloved tradition that should remain; others say it is a racist stereotype.

    Peter Dejong/AP


    For an American, watching a Sinterklaas parade, like the one I recently went to in Amsterdam, can be a bit of a shock. Because dancing around the dear old Dutch Santa are his helpers, known as Zwarte Piet, or Black Pete.

    And Black Pete is played by scores of white people dressed up in black face ... and wearing Afro wigs.

    In the past few years, Black Pete has come under fire. A beloved tradition for some, others say he is a racist stereotype. And the increasingly rancorous debate over Black Pete has gripped the Netherlands.

    Marc Gilling, 50, has been playing Black Pete since he was 8.

    "My father played Sinterklaas, so it was normal that I dressed up as Black Pete," says Gilling. Black Pete may look like a minstrel show performer to me, but Gilling says he's a centuries-old figure, and there's nothing racist about him.

    "It's a lovely thing to do, being a joyful Pete," he says. "You see the smile on the faces of the children. They just love Pete. And all the kids want to dress up and play Pete, whether they're black or white."
    i
    Raimund Larat at a recent Sinterklaas parade in Amsterdam. He and his family object to the Black Pete tradition and believe the Christmas character should change.

    Eleanor Beardsley/NPR


    But others, like Raimund Larat, 23, who is black, see it differently. Larat, whose parents emigrated to Holland from the former Dutch colony of Suriname in South America, says people called him Black Pete when he was young and he took it as an insult.

    "We feel hurt by the tradition that they call a tradition," says Larat. "There are a lot of people that don't agree with the way this holiday is celebrated. And there is something that has to change."

    Larat says Sinterklaas is fine, but Black Pete must go.

    "We need to find a Christmas character that everyone can identify with and be joyful about," he says.

    There are different views on the history of Black Pete. Some say he goes back centuries, and is dark because he once represented the devil. Others say Black Pete depicts an African slave subservient to Sinterklaas. Still others say Black Pete is only sooty from sliding down chimneys.

    But everyone agrees that the playful, bumbling Black Pete character celebrated today was popularized in a 19th-century Dutch children's story. According to tradition, Sinterklaas and his Black Pete helpers arrive every November by boat from Spain, bringing presents and candy for every Dutch girl and boy. And they're welcomed in celebrations across the Netherlands.

    But this year there were protests: Hundreds of people demonstrated at Black Pete parades. In the medieval town of Gouda, dozens of demonstrators were arrested.

    Dutch newspaper columnist Bas Heijne says calls to do away with Black Pete have stirred fierce resistance: "You could say that the whole idea of a pluralist society, of multiculturalism, which has held for a long time in Holland, is now breaking down."

    Heijne says the Dutch, because of globalization, are unwilling to give up what they feel is one of their local traditions.

    "So there's a kind of tension, and people are saying, 'No, it's not racist, and we are not racist, so leave us alone.' "

    A Court Passes On The Question

    This month, the Netherlands' highest court refused to wade into the battle over Black Pete. Pam Evenhuis, head of Amsterdam's Sinterklaas parade committee, says that was the right decision. Society should work it out.

    "The Netherlands is a country where change goes gradually," says Evenhuis. "We're not changing from one day to the next. We don't have a supreme court that will make far-reaching decisions. Here, we have what we call a dialogue culture."

    Evenhuis says in the past year alone the number of Dutch people who say they're ready to accept changes to Black Pete has risen from 3 percent to 15 percent.

    At the parade in Amsterdam, there are signs that Black Pete is changing. His hoop earrings and big red lips are gone. Some of this year's Petes aren't black, but streaked in gray coal dust. And there's talk about creating multicolor Petes and clown Petes.

    Mira Barens, 10, is here with her mother, Mikah, who came to the same Sinterklaas parade when she was a girl. Barens says she's not trying to shield her daughter from the current debate.

    "No, we debate it at home as well," she says.

    Barens says that's how she and her husband came to the conclusion that Black Pete is, as she says, a little bit racist.

    "I think what they're doing now to give Pete other colors and the whole debate about him is very good," she says.

    Barens believes Black Pete will eventually go. But columnist Bas Heijne says the whole debate is really about deeper problems of inequality in Dutch society and that painting Black Pete's face green won't solve them.
    Santa's Black-Faced Helpers Are Under Fire In The Netherlands : Code Switch : NPR


  11. #41
    Elite Member Annika's Avatar
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    that whole santa in a pope suit is going to give me nightmares.

    a couple of halloweens ago my brother and i went into a costume store. they had the fricking jesus suit next to the terrorist leader suit. i guess they figured to put the beardy stock together... i can't believe they had a terrorist suit, nevermind next to jesus.


  12. #42
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    ^^^ Ah, I once saw something that was called a "Jesus Set", cheap, pink plastic, an altar, color changing diodes, the cheesiest possible Jesus Portrait, a pink cross. There also was a little plastic bottle for holy water. Special offer, 1 Euro. I stood there for a good minute trying to wrap my mind around it. I just had to laugh but felt uneasy and a tad angry at the same time. It was so irreverent. I wanted to apologize to every religious Christian at once.
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