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Thread: Alec and Hilaria Baldwin expecting their fourth child

  1. #556
    Elite Member Beeyotch's Avatar
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    I propose we move to the cheese segment of the thread. *ushers everyone this way--->*
    lindsaywhit likes this.

  2. #557
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    gouda idea
    mostroop, Beeyotch, fgg and 1 others like this.
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  3. #558
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    I’ll brie right there because EDAM! that were to shit fast!

    My Great-Niece is quite the babybel, last night my sister sent me a photo of her giving her grandpa the finger! (True story)
    "I don't know what I am to them, maybe a penguin XD" - Tiny Pixie

  4. #559
    Elite Member lindsaywhit's Avatar
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  5. #560
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindsaywhit;[URL="tel:3809536"
    I don’t wanna see Baldwin’s cheesy balls!!!
    "I don't know what I am to them, maybe a penguin XD" - Tiny Pixie

  6. #561
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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  7. #562
    Elite Member dexter7's Avatar
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    LEAVE US ALONE! DON'T ASK QUESTIONS!

    But please give me a like, and tell me how amazing I am at managing my large family!
    czb, Novice, Daphodil and 8 others like this.

  8. #563
    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Why does she still write like she's ESL? "I call in back up, and we send this..." wtf does that even mean? "or whatever you are concerned of" - is that a character limit thing, or does she deliberately write like she's running everything through google translate?
    mostroop and weathered1 like this.
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  9. #564
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Faithanne did you forget she’s spainish????




    And *nobody* mention the fecking nannies!!!!!
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  10. #565
    Gold Member Daphodil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post









    This is why I want to punch her in the throat. "I've had 27 children...look at me! Diamond earrings and a sweatshirt! I am tonta!"

  11. #566
    Elite Member MsDark's Avatar
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    Has to put the gigantic rock in every pic.

    Yep. The Spanish kids I see.
    Novice likes this.
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  12. #567
    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    Fuck off attention whore.
    SHELLEE and Kittylady like this.
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  13. #568
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    The Identity Hoaxers

    What if people don’t just invent medical symptoms to get attention—what if they feign oppression, too?




    Adam Maida / The Atlantic



    he confession, when it came, did not hold back. “For the better part of my adult life, every move I’ve made, every relationship I’ve formed, has been rooted in the napalm toxic soil of lies,” read the Medium post. It was published in September under the name of Jessica A. Krug, a George Washington University professor specializing in Black history. Krug had, she said, variously assumed the identities of “North African Blackness, then US rooted Blackness, then Caribbean rooted Bronx Blackness.” She was actually a white Jewish woman from Kansas. “You absolutely should cancel me,” Krug wrote in her self-dramatizing mea culpa, “and I absolutely cancel myself.”
    Krug had cultivated her assumed identity over several years, and used it to speak “authentically” about race in America. The deception appears to have begun while she was studying at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, where Krug “used to identify as half Algerian, saying that her father was a white man of German ancestry who had raped her mother,” a fellow academic told The Cut. When Krug moved to New York, she became Afro-Latinx, and used the name “Jessica La Bombalera” for her activism. One of her former students said: “There was this theme in her teaching of being super-representative of her communities and saying that folks had destroyed it and gentrified it. Now looking back, she was talking about herself.”



    One of the oddest aspects of the saga was that Krug’s assumed identity was so stereotypical as to be borderline unconvincing: She wore hoop earrings, crop tops, and “tight, tight cheetah pants” to class, and spoke with an exaggerated accent. She also took funding from a program designed for marginalized scholars. According to Gisela Fosado of Duke University Press, the publisher of Krug’s academic book, her scholarship “may not have ever existed without the funding that was inseparable from her two decades of lies.” And yet—the work was well regarded. The white, Jewish Jessica Krug could have had an academic career. What she would not have had was moral authority.
    Perhaps the strangest aspect of the case, however, is that it is not unique. In fact, Krug’s admission was prompted by scholars in the field discussing the case of H. G. Carrillo, who was also a professor at GW. After he died from COVID-19 in April, Carrillo’s family came forward to correct the initial tributes: The author of Loosing My Espanish was not, as he had always presented himself, a member of the Cuban diaspora, but a Black man born in Detroit. His birth name was Herman Glenn Carroll. This was news to everyone, including his husband.
    Those who had nursed suspicions for years about colleagues and acquaintances soon brought other cases to light. Over the holiday season, the self-presentation of Hilaria Baldwin—the wife of the actor Alec, with whom she has five “Baldwinitos”—was questioned. Baldwin, who had long presented herself as nebulously Hispanic, admitted that she was born Hillary Lynn Hayward-Thomas to white, English-speaking Bostonian parents who have since retired to Spain. Before that came the academics Kelly Kean Sharp and CV Vitolo-Haddad, the attorney Natasha Lycia Ora Bannan, and the activist Satchuel Cole. All were white, but were assumed to be minorities in their professional and personal lives. The best-known example of all is Rachel Dolezal, who now goes by Nkechi Amare Diallo.



    The superficial similarities among all of these cases are striking: mostly women, all educated and professionally successful, all working in fields engaged with questions of oppression and marginalization. And in all of these cases, somewhere along the line, empathy tipped into appropriation. It was not enough to feel the pain of marginalized groups; they had to be part of them, too.
    Baron munchausen lived an eventful life. He rode a cannonball, traveled to the moon, and was swallowed, Jonah-like, by a giant fish. When his horse was cut in two, he substituted a laurel tree for its missing legs.
    You will not be surprised to hear that none of these stories is true. The 18th-century German writer Rudolf Erich Raspe borrowed the name of a real-life aristocrat for a series of fantasies. The actual baron, Hieronymus Karl Friedrich, Freiherr von Münchhausen, had told tall tales about his military career, and his name became a byword for exaggerated claims.
    In 1951, the baron’s name was used by the British physician Richard Asher to describe a syndrome that he claimed “most doctors have seen, but about which little has been written.” A patient would arrive at a hospital with an acute illness, but no cause could be found. The presence of a large number of abdominal scars, from investigative surgery, was one clue to physicians that they were in the presence of a faker. But otherwise, such patients usually managed to string along their doctors for days or weeks; it took, Asher wrote, a “bold” emergency-room doctor to refuse them admission.



    Asher argued that many of these patients were genuinely ill in some way, “although their illness is shrouded by duplicity and distortion.” He also noted that their lies had no obvious purpose: They did not want to defraud the state or solicit charitable donations. In pursuit of nothing more than attention and an audience, they were willing to tolerate painful and intrusive medical procedures. “The most remarkable feature of the syndrome,” Asher concluded, “is the apparent senselessness of it.”
    Munchausen syndrome is now known as “factitious disorder,” and has spawned a series of spin-offs: In Munchausen syndrome by proxy, a caregiver—usually a mother—makes up an illness or injury on behalf of a patient, or even causes the problem by poison or other methods; “Munchausen by internet” describes a syndrome wherein patients pose as sick or dying in chat rooms and online support groups.
    From the start, Munchausen syndrome had a social component as well as a medical one. Asher wrote that his patients’ lies were not confined to their illnesses. One might claim to be “an ex-submarine commander who was tortured by the Gestapo.” Another would spin a tale about “being an ex-opera-singer and helping in the French resistance movement.” They latched on to the Second World War to create a heroic narrative, attaching their personal pain to a grander, global story.
    The sickness fakers were not the only ones to do this. Half a century after Asher identified the syndrome, an extraordinary event took place. In April 1998, two child survivors of the Holocaust, Binjamin Wilkomirski and Laura Grabowski, performed together—on clarinet and piano, respectively—for a crowd drawn from the Child Holocaust Survivors Group of Los Angeles, the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, and a local synagogue. The pair played a song written by Grabowski, “Ode to the Little Ones,” dedicated to all the Jewish children who had died in the Holocaust.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/internat...ndrome/618289/



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  14. #569
    Elite Member dexter7's Avatar
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    So i fell into a rabbit hole after clinking on the link to the article in Novice's post, the article has links to other articles that have links to a bunch of different things. Mostly about white people pretending to be a minority, it's disgusting. Anyway, this excerpt is from an article about a white man who claimed Cherokee Indian heritage, but was a ku klux klan member, and they threw this tidbit in there about the klan he was involved in (though he wasn't present during the act)

    "He even organized a paramilitary unit of about 100 men that he called the Original Ku Klux Klan of the Confederacy. Among its acts, these white-sheeted sociopaths assaulted Nat (King) Cole during a concert in Birmingham in 1956. In 1957, the group, without Mr. Carter present, castrated a black man they chose at random in a Birmingham suburb as a warning to "uppity" Alabama blacks."

    Maybe it's due to the vulgarity of the act, maybe because it happened in my country within 20 years of my birth, maybe it's because of the casual way the article describes something horrific....I don't know. It really bothers me that people were allowed to get away with is crap, because I'm sure those men who did that weren't held accountable. The irrevocably altered the physical state of a (assumed) healthy man, I just don't understand this level of hate towards another race.

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