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Thread: Alec Baldwin fatally shoots cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on movie set

  1. #121
    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
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    The other day I accidentally stood on a snail as I was dragging the bin out for collection and I felt shitty about it all day. How on earth could someone accidentally shoot another person and feel no guilt?
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  2. #122
    Gold Member firebrat1229's Avatar
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    ^^^ This. Even if I did everything 100 percent by the book the guilt would still likely have me hospitalized, at the very least.

    That's some sociopathic level side-stepping right there.
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  3. #123
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    ALEC BALDWIN NOT IN CLEAR YET ON 'RUST' PROBE ...D.A. Reacts to ABC Interview


    Alec Baldwin's claim he's not responsible for Halyna Hutchins' death is not echoed by the woman leading the "Rust" shooting investigation -- instead, she says Baldwin, and several others, could still be charged for their roles in the tragedy.
    During his sit-down with George Stephanopoulos, Baldwin said he didn't feel guilt over what went down. As he put it, "Someone is responsible for what happened and I can't say who that is, but I know it's not me."
    Well, Santa Fe County District Attorney Mary Carmack-Altwies isn't ready to clear his name, criminally, just yet. She tells TMZ ... "Everyone involved in the handling and use of firearms on the set had a duty to behave in a manner such that the safety of others was protected, and it appears that certain actions and inactions contributed to this outcome."
    Her Office, along with the Sheriff's Dept., hasn't completed their probe yet ... and she's making it clear no decisions have been made about exactly who could be charged. She says, "Once I have had the opportunity to review the complete investigation, certain individuals may be criminally culpable for his/her actions and/or inactions on the set of Rust."



    And, there's this ... Baldwin's explanation for how he fired the fatal shot isn't holding water with weapons expert Steve Wolf, who says the "no trigger" theory IS possible -- but there were several other mistakes made on the set.
    Steve's been working with munitions and props for TV and film for decades, so he was particularly interested in Baldwin's claimthat the replica antique revolver he was holding fired without him pulling the trigger.


    Steve was on Friday's "TMZ Live" when he held up a similar handgun and demonstrated exactly what Baldwin described. He pulled back the hammer on the weapon, but unlike Alec claimed ... Steve says it's just not possible for the hammer to strike and fire a bullet without the trigger getting engaged. Not normally, anyway.
    He admitted there are 2 possible exceptions -- first, there could have been a mechanical flaw ... and the other possibility has to do with how the weapon was manufactured.


    The Colt .45 Baldwin was using is a replica of an 1873 revolver, and it could have been made without a safety feature that is standard on such weapons now, but wasn't back in the 19th century.
    Steve says investigators will be able to determine what really happened by inspecting the gun.
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  4. #124
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    'RUST' MOVIE SHOOTINGCOPS LOOKING INTO AMMO SUPPLIER ...Get New Search Warrant


    11/30/2021 5:11 PM PT

    5:11 PM PT -- Hannah's attorney, Jason Bowles, tells TMZ ... sheriffs took a huge step towards finding who put live ammo on the movie set by executing the search warrant, and the expectation is for the FBI to compare and analyze the live rounds from the set with the live rounds seized at PDQ Arm & Prop to determine where they came from.
    The big mystery in the fatal shooting on the set of Alec Baldwin's movie "Rust" remains ... how live rounds ended up in the weapon, and now investigators are taking a closer look at the film's ammo supplier.
    According to a new search warrant, obtained by TMZ, detectives in New Mexico have interviewed a guy named Seth Kenney, one of the suppliers of the ammunition head armorer Hannah Reedused on set.


    Cops also spoke to Hannah's father, Thell Reed, who himself is an experienced armorer who has worked with Seth. In the docs, cops say Thell told them he and Seth crossed paths on a different production ... a month or 2 before the "Rust" tragedy.
    What's interesting about that is ... Thell claims Seth brought live ammo -- a can with about 200 to 300 rounds -- to that set for the purpose of weapons training. When the training was completed, Thell says Seth took back the remaining bullets, and claims that included some live Colt .45 ammo.
    The gun Baldwin fired was a long barrel Colt .45. You see where Thell is going with this -- he told cops the leftover ammo from his production might match that which killed cinematographer Halyna Hutchins.

    Facebook/Serge Svetnoy

    That's his theory, anyway, and cops are willing to check it out -- the Santa Fe County Sheriff's Dept. got the warrant to search Seth's company, PDQ Arm & Prop.
    Presumably, they want to see if the fatal round matches those in the can of live ammo from a couple months ago. The judge signed off, giving detectives the greenlight to scoop up the potential evidence.
    And, there's this ... according to the docs, cops also spoke to "Rust" prop master, Sarah Zachry, who said she checked the ammo box -- after Halyna was shot -- and found some bullets that rattled, indicating they're dummy rounds, and others that didn't. That led her to believe there were even more live rounds in the ammo box.



    Remember, Hannah's attorneys floated a theory that someone, perhaps a disgruntled crew member, intentionally brought live bullets on set to sabotage the production -- but D.A. Mary Carmack-Altwies has said she isn't buying that.







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  5. #125
    Elite Member lindsaywhit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kittylady View Post
    The other day I accidentally stood on a snail as I was dragging the bin out for collection and I felt shitty about it all day. How on earth could someone accidentally shoot another person and feel no guilt?
    Quote Originally Posted by firebrat1229 View Post
    ^^^ This. Even if I did everything 100 percent by the book the guilt would still likely have me hospitalized, at the very least.

    That's some sociopathic level side-stepping right there.
    Some of you know that about 25 years ago I was driving on a beautiful, curvy road in Connecticut at about 3 in the afternoon. My two boys were in the back seat - they were 4 & 6 years old, and suddenly there was something large and heavy clunking up and over my car on the passenger side. I had hit a 9-year-old boy on his bike. (I think he was nine - it kind of shocks me I don't know for sure, but I do have memory issues.) Anyway, he was wearing a helmet and that certainly saved his life, but his leg was really busted up, and he spent quite some time in the hospital and then in physical therapy.

    I didn't even get a ticket, because he was riding his bike on the wrong side of the road, and the investigators determined I was on the road at the proper place and was driving a bit below the speed limit. The reason I'm giving all these facts is just to explain that as far as the police were concerned, I was not in any way at fault. My insurance company offered them $175,000 anyway, because taking a case involving a child to a jury is almost always bad news for the not-child party. They wanted more and sued me for $325,000. (I think? Memory issues.)

    So, all this is a lead up to my cross examination by their attorney, who asked me, "Do you feel guilty about hitting Samuel, even though he was on the wrong side of the road?"

    My attorney told me later I looked at the guy like he was crazy. "Of course I feel guilty! He's a child! There isn't a day that goes by that I don't think about him, and worry about him, and hope that he is doing well in spite of this horrible accident. I'm the adult and adults are supposed to protect children." (Paraphrased, obviously.)

    I told the truth. I still get a sick pit in my stomach just thinking about that afternoon. When something like that happens, I think a normal, somewhat mentally healthy person would feel some sense of guilt, asking themselves, "What could I have done differently? Was I somehow being reckless or less watchful than I thought? Will this poor kid ever get over the trauma of this accident? Does he suffer from PTSD? Is he afraid to ride his bike now? If he has children does he let them ride a bike?"

    Andrew and Alec. These effing old white men who coast up and over the rest of the world littering a trail of bodies and souls along the way but are perfectly comfortable dismissing any viewpoint but their own. SMDH.
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  6. #126
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    Lindsaywhit -- I hadn't heard that story. I can't imagine how horrible that experience was.

    Thanks for your input on the Alec guilt issue.

  7. #127
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    i think feeling guilt and being responsible are two different things. i get that alec and whoever advises him (god i hope it's not eelaria) weren't just thinking of public perception but also the lawsuits and wanted to make sure baldwin didn't convey that he felt responsible for what happened but he really shouldn't be speaking right now, at all. and if he did feel compelled to say something, he could say something like 'of course i feel guilty and horrible about what happened even if i know i'm not the one responsible' which would both make him look human and empathetic, and make clear he doesn't think he's responsible/accountable for what went down.

    i don't think alec is responsible whether he pulled the trigger or not. he was on a set, he had every reason to believe it was a regular prop and why would he even suspect there was a live round in there? so he's not responsible directly for hte shooting. now whether or not, as a producer, he's indirectly responsible for the lack of safety on set and creating the conditions that made this accident possible, that remains to be seen and in that case he won't be the only one, there will be other producers and the studio to hold accountable as well. i don't see them being held criminally liable (i'm guessing that will be the armorer woman) but i hope they had really good insurance to pay for the damages.
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    The only thing I might disagree with you on is about the final response person(s). I think that the person/people supplying the rounds might be responsible?
    I haven’t worked out why yet but it’s sometimes do with repacked rounds.
    But eventually I think it will be a broad brush stroke….



    Ah Alec is neither feeling guilty nor responsible

    When asked if he felt guilt over her death, the actor and producer, 63, said: "No. No. I feel that... someone is responsible for what happened and I can't say who that is, but I know it's not me. Honest to God, if I felt that I was responsible, I might've killed myself if I thought that I was responsible. And I don't say that lightly."
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  9. #129
    Elite Member lindsaywhit's Avatar
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    Wouldn't you think with something this important, and with tragedies in the review mirror, there should be an industry standard in place?

    Why isn't there? Historically, the one great thing insurance companies have done for the world is to insist on safety standards for anything they insured, across all industries. So why haven't insurance companies insisted on an film industry safety standard for weapons of any kind? Anyone know? Or does low-budget mean uninsured?
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  10. #130
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    There are but you have to abide by them….



    On a safe production, each firearm is meticulously inspected every time it changes hands. It means every take of every angle of every scene; the same prop gun could be checked and re-checked dozens upon dozens of times in a single day. Live ammunition, without question, is never allowed on set. Aside from the actors during a scene, the firearms specialist is the only person who handles the weapons and the only person who can open them for full inspection by cast and crew.
    This person is commonly referred to as the Firearms Safety Coordinator, a title I've held many times. Other productions may use the term Armorer or Key Weapons Handler. But it doesn't matter what we are called; it matters why we are there.
    How live rounds got in Alec Baldwin's gun is key to 'Rust' shooting investigation

    It's not just about keeping the cast and crew safe when there are firearms present on set. We make sure people know the weapon itself is safe to use. Once we inspect a firearm to make sure it is empty and ready to handle, we show it to both the actor who is going to work with it and any other cast members who may have the empty firearm pointed at them. On film sets, the person most responsible for safety is usually the First Assistant Director, and as a result they will also inspect the firearm -- a task the director, producer, camera operator or cinematographer may oversee, too.
    Every single person on set -- cast or crew -- has the right to inspect a prop gun. But the specialist is the only person who will hand the firearm to an actor for use, and the specialist is the same person who receives it back when the talent is done.
    It's also standard protocol for a firearm to be empty for the majority of takes. It is only when the camera needs to capture a gunshot a firearm is loaded with blanks, which are special cartridges designed to rapidly burn gunpowder out the front of a firearm's barrel. The hole at the end of the barrel is known as the muzzle, and because a blank contains no projectile but an excess amount of gunpowder, the brief ignition creates a muzzle flash which helps sell a realistic shooting scene.

    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2021/10/25/o...own/index.html





    Collaborating With Talent
    The best part of a career in film is the opportunity to work with so many amazingly talented actors and cinematographers. One of the highlights was teaming with cinematographer James Glennon, ASC and actor Robin Williams on the 2005 film The Big White. During shooting, I was fortunate to become friends with both — and I quickly found out that beneath the humor, Robin Williams never missed a detail.

    Many of our scenes involved a revolver. Every day I would show him the empty firearm, load six dummy cartridges into the chambers so it looked fully loaded to camera, and demonstrate that it was completely safe by pointing it in a safe direction and pulling the trigger eight times.
    Over the course of two months, he silently observed that I always pulled the trigger exactly eight clicks — two more than necessary for the revolver’s six chambers. Then, on our final day, as I was preparing for our last scene together, Robin asked me why I always pulled the trigger eight times. I told him my personal reason: “The first six are for you, the seventh one is for me, and the eighth one is for Brandon Lee.” The very talented James Glennon, also a skilled person with a firearm, nodded his head in silent agreement.

    https://ascmag.com/blog/filmmakers-f...-with-firearms




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  11. #131
    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    Alec has deleted his Twitter account again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice;[URL="tel:3829262"
    3829262[/URL]]Alec has deleted his Twitter account again.
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    Quote Originally Posted by OrangeSlice View Post
    Alec has deleted his Twitter account again.
    Now if we can just get E-lar-ee-ah to do the same with her Insta.

  14. #134
    Elite Member lindsaywhit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    i think feeling guilt and being responsible are two different things. i get that alec and whoever advises him (god i hope it's not eelaria) weren't just thinking of public perception but also the lawsuits and wanted to make sure baldwin didn't convey that he felt responsible for what happened but he really shouldn't be speaking right now, at all. and if he did feel compelled to say something, he could say something like 'of course i feel guilty and horrible about what happened even if i know i'm not the one responsible' which would both make him look human and empathetic, and make clear he doesn't think he's responsible/accountable for what went down.

    i don't think alec is responsible whether he pulled the trigger or not. he was on a set, he had every reason to believe it was a regular prop and why would he even suspect there was a live round in there? so he's not responsible directly for hte shooting. now whether or not, as a producer, he's indirectly responsible for the lack of safety on set and creating the conditions that made this accident possible, that remains to be seen and in that case he won't be the only one, there will be other producers and the studio to hold accountable as well. i don't see them being held criminally liable (i'm guessing that will be the armorer woman) but i hope they had really good insurance to pay for the damages.
    You know, when I first heard about this tragedy, I felt genuinely sorry for Alec, and in many ways I still feel that way. It is a horrific situation by anyone's point of view, but obviously Alec didn't intend to kill this poor woman. Now my view is changing quite a bit, and not only because he is proving to actually be the stupid, self-absorbed, moron we all know he is.

    The thing is, I've been on lots of movie and television sets (albeit 30 years ago) and they stop and start constantly. They debate how their hair should be styled (curl allowed to fall on forehead or ruthlessly brushed back); emphasis on this or that word; motivation for arms folded against chest rather than fisted at their sides. (I didn't make up those examples. )

    So, taking 30 seconds to check that the gun chamber is empty seems like a ridiculously simple safety measure. Because, it's not just a prop - it's not a squirt gun, or a rubber gun, or a child's toy - it's a real damn gun.

    As soon as I start thinking that way, though, I also think about how oddly routine handling a real damn gun would feel on a film set, and then I feel horrible for everyone involved - even Alec Baldwin. (If he had just kept his mouth shut, he'd have a lot more sympathy - idiot.)

    For me, though, the real question is starting to look a lot more sinister - did a disgruntled crew member purposely put a live round in the gun?

  15. #135
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lindsaywhit View Post

    For me, though, the real question is starting to look a lot more sinister - did a disgruntled crew member purposely put a live round in the gun?
    i think that's what the armorer chick, or her people, are claiming?
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