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Thread: Alec Baldwin fatally shoots cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on movie set

  1. #16
    Bronze Member ivey.girl's Avatar
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    After reading about Jensen Ackles encounter with the Armorer/Weapons Master for the set...and how careless they were during his training, I wouldn't be surprised if the company handling or the individual themselves, will be held accountable. In no way, shape or form is Alec Baldwin responsible for her death. He can be a hot headed at times tyrant of a man, but as many here agree, he would never be reckless with another persons life or intentionally endanger/kill anyone. That's my opinion.
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    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    As the producer of the movie he will probably be held accountable to some degree, though.......
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    Yup. I could have sworn I saw a comment on another site that the crew had walked off the set a couple of days ago to protest unsafe conditions. That being said, I don't know if Baldwin's producer credit is just a vanity credit or what. There seems to be at least two or three production companies involved, including Baldwin's. Baldwin and the director (Souza?) are also co-writers.

  4. #19
    Elite Member ConstanceSpry's Avatar
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    Oh, that's just terrible. I can't see anyone ever getting over something like this, regardless of the circumstances. Very sad all around.
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    Elite Member dolem's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Yup. I could have sworn I saw a comment on another site that the crew had walked off the set a couple of days ago to protest unsafe conditions. That being said, I don't know if Baldwin's producer credit is just a vanity credit or what. There seems to be at least two or three production companies involved, including Baldwin's. Baldwin and the director (Souza?) are also co-writers.
    I saw that the crew unions were planning to strike over working conditions; long hours, pay raises, rest, meals, etc. I found an article that they reached a deal just a few days ago. I'm not sure if that is related or not.

    I did just find this article from the LA Times
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    Elite Member Daphodil's Avatar
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    Actors are not responsible for props or prop guns (even if that actor can be a real asshole). Either someone else was negligent or it was a bizarre set of circumstances that lead to a tragedy.

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    this is awful. Poor woman but yeah, poor Alec. He may be a hothead but he never struck me as callous and living with something like this - even if you know it’s not your fault - would haunt you forever.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jadestone View Post
    There are a LOT of questions raised by this incident. The director of photography and the director wouldn't have been the people who I would have expected to be in the line of fire. Was this a rehearsal, or was he waving the prop gun around, or...? And he shot not one but two people. No matter how it's explained, there seemed to be gross negligence involved. They'll probably try to do damage control, but I don't see Baldwin's career or even this movie surviving this tragedy.
    What a weird take. why would it affect Baldwin’s career? It’s not like it’s his fault if a prop doesn’t work properly and if there was negligence (which isn’t a given, sometimes accidents happen and however awful there just isn’t anyone to blame), it would be on the part of whoever is responsible for the props, not the actor who fires the gun.
    I also don’t think it’s surprising at all that the director and the director of photography would be in the line of fire. They were probably filming from different angles and one of those angles would be right behind the person getting shot.
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    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    Live rounds shouldn't even be on a movie set. WTF.
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    this is awful. Poor woman but yeah, poor Alec. He may be a hothead but he never struck me as callous and living with something like this - even if you know it’s not your fault - would haunt you forever.


    What a weird take. why would it affect Baldwin’s career? It’s not like it’s his fault if a prop doesn’t work properly and if there was negligence (which isn’t a given, sometimes accidents happen and however awful there just isn’t anyone to blame), it would be on the part of whoever is responsible for the props, not the actor who fires the gun.
    I also don’t think it’s surprising at all that the director and the director of photography would be in the line of fire. They were probably filming from different angles and one of those angles would be right behind the person getting shot.
    I read somewhere that the reason there could be two shooting victims was that they were filming a down-the-barrel shot. So, basically, filming it as if Baldwin was firing at you (victim's perspective). That could have put both the cinematographer and the director in the line of fire. I think the cinematographer would be more likely to be operating the camera with the directory possibly looking over her shoulder.
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    Elite Member C_is_for_Cookie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by philippa View Post
    Ugh. This happens far too often.

    I’m no fan of Alec but I feel for him. I don’t think that’s something you’d ever get over.
    Michael Massee never got over it and he said many years after it happened that he still had nightmares about it.
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    Elite Member MsDark's Avatar
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    Reading that article I linked in my last post explains how this can happen.

    Instead of using a bullet, blanks use wads of paper, plastic, felt or cotton – this wadding ensures you get a certain level of flame out of the gun.
    But this wadding is the thing which can cause a lot of injury: just because a gun is using blanks, that doesn’t mean it isn’t dangerous.
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  12. #27
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    ‘Rust’ crew describes on-set gun safety issues and misfires days before fatal shooting




    Alec Baldwin speaks on the phone outside the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office after he was questioned about the shooting on the set of the film “Rust.”
    (Jim Weber / New Mexican)


    BY MEG JAMES, AMY KAUFMAN


    OCT. 22, 2021 UPDATED 4:38 PM PT

    Hours before actor Alec Baldwin fatally shot a cinematographer on the New Mexico set of “Rust” with a prop gun, a half-dozen camera crew workers walked off the set to protest working conditions.

    The camera operators and their assistants were frustrated by the conditions surrounding the low-budget film, including complaints about long hours, long commutes and collecting their paychecks, according to three people familiar with the matter who were not authorized to comment.

    Safety protocols standard in the industry, including gun inspections, were not strictly followed on the “Rust” set near Santa Fe, the sources said. They said at least one of the camera operators complained last weekend to a production manager about gun safety on the set.

    Three crew members who were present at the Bonanza Creek Ranch set that day said they were particularly concerned about two accidental prop gun discharges on Saturday.

    Baldwin’s stunt-double accidentally fired two rounds Saturday after being told that the gun was “cold” — lingo for a weapon that doesn’t have any ammunition, including blanks, two crew members who witnessed the episode told the Los Angeles Times.

    “There should have been an investigation into what happened,” said the crew member. “There were no safety meetings. There was no assurance that it wouldn’t happen again. All they wanted to do was rush, rush, rush.”

    A colleague was so alarmed by the prop gun misfires he sent a text message to the unit production manager. “We’ve now had 3 accidental discharges. This is super unsafe,” according to a copy of the message reviewed by the Times.

    “The safety of our cast and crew is the top priority of Rust Productions and everyone associated with the company, " Rust Movie Productions LLC said in a statement.

    “Though we were not made aware of any official complaints concerning weapon or prop safety on set, we will be conducting an internal review of our procedures while production is shut down. We will continue to cooperate with the Santa Fe authorities in their investigation and offer mental health services to the cast and crew during this tragic time.”

    The tragedy occurred Thursday afternoon during filming of a gunfight that began in a church that is part of the old Western town at the ranch.

    Baldwin’s character was supposed to back out of the church, according to production notes obtained by The Times. It was the 12th day of a 21-day shoot.

    Hutchins was huddled around a monitor lining up her next camera shot when she was accidentally killed by Baldwin.

    The actor was preparing to film a scene in which he pulls a gun out of a holster, according to a source close to the production. Crew members had already shouted “cold gun” on the New Mexico set. The filmmaking team was lining up its camera angles and had yet to retreat to the video village, an on-set area where crew gathers to watch filming from a distance via a monitor.

    Instead, the B-camera operator was on a dolly with a monitor, checking out the potential shots. Hutchins was also looking at the monitor from over the operator’s shoulder, as was the movie’s director, Joel Souza, who was crouching just behind her.

    Baldwin removed the gun from its holster once without incident, but the second time he repeated the action, ammunition flew toward the trio around the monitor. The projectile whizzed by the camera operator but penetrated Hutchins near her shoulder, then continued through to Souza. Hutchins immediately fell to the ground as crew members applied pressure to her wound in an attempt to stop the bleeding.

    Earlier in the day, the camera crew showed up for work as expected at 6:30 a.m. and began gathering up their gear and personal belongings to leave, one knowledgeable crew member told The Times.

    Labor trouble had been brewing for days on the dusty set at the Bonanza Creek Ranch near Santa Fe.

    Shooting began on Oct. 6 and members of the low-budget film said they had been promised the production would pay for their hotel rooms in Santa Fe.




    Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins killed by a prop gun just as her career was taking off

    But after filming began, the crews were told they instead would be required to make the 50-mile drive from Albuquerque each day, rather than stay overnight in nearby Santa Fe. That rankled crew members who worried that they might have an accident after spending 12 to 13 hours on the set.

    The cinematographer who was accidentally killed, Halyna Hutchins, had been advocating for safer conditions for her team, said one crew member who was on the set and was tearful when the camera crew left.

    “She said, ‘I feel like I’m losing my best friends,’” recalled one of the workers.

    As the camera crew — members of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees — spent about an hour assembling their gear at the Bonanza Creek Ranch, several nonunion crew members showed up to replace them, two of the knowledgeable people said.

    One of the producers ordered the union members to leave the set and threatened to call security to remove them if they didn’t leave voluntarily.

    “Corners were being cut — and they brought in nonunion people so they could continue shooting,” the knowledgeable person said.

    The shooting occurred about six hours after the union camera crew left.

    Baldwin, the film’s star who also served as a producer on the film, was apparently rehearsing a scene outside the church of the Bonzana Creek Ranch set, according to two knowledgeable people.




    Halyna Hutchins was killed on the set of ‘Rust’ by a prop gun. Our developing coverage

    The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office said deputies were dispatched to the Bonanza Creek Ranch movie set, where filming was underway for the western “Rust,” after calls to 911 at 1:50 p.m. Baldwin was starring in the movie in addition to serving as one of the producers.

    No charges have been filed, but the Sheriff’s Office said that “witnesses continue to be interviewed by detectives.”

    Baldwin said Friday he’s “fully cooperating with the police investigation” into the incident.

    “There are no words to convey my shock and sadness regarding the tragic accident that took the life of Halyna Hutchins, a wife, mother and deeply admired colleague of ours,” Baldwin wrote Friday in a series of tweets.

    Production has been halted on the low-budget movie, which began filming this month.

    In an email to its members, Local 44 of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, a union that represents prop masters, said the shot that killed Hutchins and injured director Joel Souza on Thursday was “a live single round.”




    Alec Baldwin says he’s cooperating with investigation of fatal shooting on ‘Rust’ set

    “As many of us have already heard, there was an accidental weapons discharge on a production titled Rust being filmed in New Mexico,” said the North Hollywood-based local. “A live single round was accidentally fired on set by the principal actor, hitting both the Director of Photography, Local 600 member Halyna Hutchins, and Director Joel Souza. Both were rushed to the hospital,” the email said.

    A source close to union said Local 44 does not know what projectile was in the gun and clarified that “live” is an industry term that refers to a gun being loaded with some material such as a blank ready for filming.

    Bonanza Creek Ranch has been a popular filming location for more than 60 years. The first movie to film there was “The Man From Laramie,” starring Jimmy Stewart. It also was the set for the classic “Blazing Saddles,” “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs” and the popular TV show “Longmire.”

    One of the financiers for “Rust” is Santa Monica-based lender BondIt Media Capital, founded in 2013 by Matthew Helderman and Luke Taylor. According to its website, BondIt finances movies through instruments including gaps loans, bridge loans and tax credit financing.

    The company has primarily financed low-budget movies including the Bruce Willis actioner “Hard Kill,” the Charlotte Kirk horror flick “The Reckoning” and the upcoming Robert De Niro film “Wash Me In the River,” directed by Randall Emmett.

    BondIt was particularly active during the COVID-19 pandemic, stepping in to fill financing gaps as independent producers struggled to find backing for films during the public health crisis

    https://www.latimes.com/entertainmen...walked-off-set
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  13. #28
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    So I am reading that the producers were cutting corners to save money; brought it non-union (& potentially under qualified) staff; told union staff to link it or lump it and that Baldwin was one of the producers.

    As much as I feel pity for this a-hole, whatever his contribution to this fuckup, my sympathies are with her family.


    Halyna Hutchins: Film world mourns 'incredible artist' and seeks answers


    22 October 2021
    IMAGE SOURCE, GETTY IMAGES


    Image caption, Hutchins was a "wonderful mother, first and foremost", a former colleague told the BBC



    Halyna Hutchins, the cinematographer who died when actor Alec Baldwin fired a prop gun on a film set, has been remembered as "an incredible artist".

    Hutchins had been working as director of photography on the set of Rust.

    American Cinematographer magazine had named her one of its rising stars in 2019, and she previously worked on 2020 independent superhero film Archenemy.

    Archenemy director Adam Egypt Mortimer told BBC News the fact she had died on a set was "really unbelievable".

    He said: "Halyna was an incredible artist who was just starting a career I think people were really starting to notice.

    "The fact that she would be killed on a set in an accident like this is unfathomable. It just seems inconceivable."

    Hutchins' most recent post on Instagram, from Tuesday, showed her riding horses on set.

    End of Instagram content, 1



    On Twitter, Alec Baldwin said "there are no words to convey my shock and sadness regarding the tragic accident that took the life of Halyna Hutchins, a wife, mother and deeply admired colleague of ours."

    "My heart is broken for her husband, their son, and all who knew and loved Halyna," he added.


    Video caption, Adam Egypt Mortimer said Hutchins' death is "unfathomable"

    Fellow cinematographer Catherine Goldschmidt described Hutchins as "lovely, warm, funny, charming, outgoing", and praised her for being "so talented".

    "What's so tragic is she's made beautiful films already but when you think about what was ahead of her, that is also so sad," she told BBC News.




    "She was also a mum, which I think is very difficult," Goldschmidt added. "When I first met her I remember being really impressed, shocked even that this beautiful, creative, outgoing, enthusiastic talented cinematographer also is raising the child.

    "I think for women in this industry it is very difficult. So I was very impressed that she was able to do that."

    IMAGE SOURCE, GETTY IMAGES


    Image caption, Hutchins was described by a friend as a "rockstar cinematographer"



    Alex Fedosov, who like Hutchins is a Ukrainian film-maker working Hollywood, said she was "rising fast in her career" and was "an artist and a visionary".

    "She was so talented, a photography director with her own vision, her own strong ideas," he told BBC News Ukrainian.

    "When we worked together on set, I was assistant director, I would rush her and say, 'Hurry up, we need to film this'. She would smile calmly but carry on in her own rhythm because she knew what she wanted to achieve."

    Innovative Artists, the agency that represented her, described her as "a ray of light" in a statement.

    "Her talent was immense, only surpassed by the love she had for her family," the agency wrote. "All those in her orbit knew what was coming; a star director of photography, who would be a force to be reckoned with."

    Standards of safety


    Fedosov added Hutchins was a "wonderful mother, first and foremost".

    He also questioned how her death could have happened, saying: "Standards of safety in the US are very high. There is always an expert on set. There are always checks ahead of filming. Blanks are used sometimes to achieve a better effect on camera but it is always done with high degree of safety."

    Director Adam Egypt Mortimer told the BBC that safety on movie sets is paramount. "The fact that a gun went off and killed Halyna is both shocking from an industry point of view and just absolutely tragic from the point of view of knowing this amazing artist who suddenly not with us."

    James Gunn, director of The Suicide Squad and Guardians of the Galaxy, said: "My greatest fear is that someone will be fatally hurt on one of my sets. I pray this will never happen. My heart goes out to all of those affected by the tragedy today on Rust, especially Halyna Hutchins and her family."

    Director and cinematographer Elle Schneider wrote a thread on Twitter about the death of her "friend and rockstar cinematographer".

    'Horrific loss'


    "I don't have words to describe this tragedy. I want answers. I want her family to somehow find peace among this horrific, horrific loss," she said.

    "Women cinematographers have historically been kept from genre film, and it seems especially cruel that one of the rising stars who was able to break through had her life cut short on the kind of project we've been fighting for."

    The American Film Institute Conservatory also paid tribute.

    End of Twitter content, 1







    Hutchins was born in Ukraine in 1979 and grew up on a Soviet military base in the Arctic Circle.

    Her website said she spent her upbringing "surrounded by reindeer and nuclear submarines".

    She entered the film industry after gaining a degree in international journalism from Kyiv State University. After working on documentaries in the UK, she moved to Los Angeles, where she graduated from the American Film Institute conservatory in 2015.

    She began working her way up in Hollywood, with credits on films including Blindfire, which she described as a "racially charged cop drama" written and directed by Mike Nell.

    She also worked on horror feature Darlin', directed by Pollyanna McIntosh, which debuted at the SXSW film festival 2019.

    American Cinematographer, a monthly magazine published by the American Society of Cinematographers, interviewed Hutchins in 2019.

    Work on British productions


    She explained to them why she moved from journalism to cinematography, saying: "My transition from journalism began when I was working on British film productions in eastern Europe, travelling with crews to remote locations and seeing how the cinematographer worked.

    "I was fascinated with storytelling based on real characters."

    Her early life as a self-described "army brat" meant she was "already a movie fan because 'there wasn't that much to do outside'", the magazine added.

    It said she gained "hands-on shooting experience from documenting her forays into such extreme sports as parachuting and cave exploration".

    After her death, the magazine paid tribute to the film-maker, saying: "We're deeply saddened by the news from Santa Fe regarding the death of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins. Safety on the set should always be of paramount concern to everyone, especially when working with firearms."

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertain...s-59007724.amp

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  14. #29
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    An interesting comment from Fark:


    Lsherm: there shouldn't be REAL guns on a movie set, and it sounds like that's what happened.


    OK, this is my literal, actual job. Almost all my recent credits have been as a gun wrangler instead of a full fight director, because there's a lot more call for guns over swords in films and plays these days.

    Your statement is wrong.

    There are, occasionally, instances where blank-adapted (ie, live) firearms are on set. This is very often the case for firearm models where no substitute is available (blank-firing weapons, electric non-guns, etc), or a prop house is unwilling to make modifications to a live firearm. All of the military firearms at the end of The Avengers 2012, for example (to use a film I worked on that you may have seen) were live firearms. The M2HB, in particular, was just a National Guard-issue M2HB which fired full-load .50BMG blank rounds.

    There are, occasionally, instances where CGI cannot be used to fake everything about firearms. Having the actor stand there with a rubber prop and pretend to feel recoil always looks fake, for example, and if no electric non-gun is available for the model of firearm being used (which is hugely common), then you end up with a live gun. In such instances, blank firearms of various loads (usually the minimum load to let the action cycle, if needed) are used. Likewise, slide action and brass are particularly irritating for VFX houses, and there are several relatively high-budget things (TV shows, mostly) which get routinely eviscerated by people who care, because they just CGI in muzzle flash and nothing else; this is where the famous shots of The Walking Dead which show an M4 firing with its ejection port closed and with no ejecting brass come from.

    There are, occasionally, instances where the director, production staff, and actors are all on board with making things as real as possible, which necessitates the use of blanks. And sometimes, live firearms (usually with interior threading inside the muzzle to fit a blank-firing adaptor which will still allow the action to cycle with the lower pressure incurred by the blank) are the best solution to that. At a minimum, live guns adapted for blank fire are universally more reliable than purpose-built blank guns. If we're on a theatre stage and a blank gun malfunctions, we improvise and go on. On a film set, if a blank gun malfunctions, the studio is out a huge amount of money as the shot is reset, so there's a strong incentive to use blank-adapted guns on film if you can't use CGI for some reason.

    But here's the thing. There are strong, stringent, should-not-be-farking-broken safeties in place on a film set or stage play in order to keep things safe. There are multiple layers of safeties and cutouts at all times** to ensure that this shiat doesn't happen, and what it means here is that not only did multiple someones screw up prior to the actor ever handling the weapon (oh, and there will be consequences about that), but it means that is Alec Baldwin a farking moron - because no matter what else happened, he still pulled the trigger while pointing a weapon directly at a person. No matter how bad anyone screws up along the line, if the actor doesn't do that, nobody gets hurt. This is something that gets hammered into the actors I train over and over and over again. The actor with his hand on the weapon is the final safety cutout in EVERY SINGLE SCENE, and if he doesn't have the mental wherewithal to understand the concepts of trigger discipline and muzzle awareness, then he doesn't belong onscreen handling weapons in the first place.

    **Rule 7: Live ammunition NEVER appears on the same set with any sort of non-rubber firearm. If a firearm capable of firing any sort of ammunition (blank or not) is on set, live ammunition is forbidden. (The Theatrical Firearms Handbook, Kevin Inouye, 2014)

    Glossary:
    Blank: An explosive cartridge with an explosive propellant in various quantities (full, 3/4, 1/2, 1/4, primer only), a primer to set off the propellant, and a casing to hold it all, with no explicit projectile.
    Blank Firing Gun: A prop which resembles a weapon, built explicitly to fire blanks and cannot be loaded with real ammunition.
    Blank-adapted Gun: A real firearm, capable of firing actual ammunition, which has been adapted with a (usually hidden) device to partially block the barrel and create enough chamber pressure to cycle the action. Is loaded with blank ammunition, but in the same caliber as real ammunition (ie, 5.56x45mm quarter-load blank; .30-06 full load blank). These tend to be "Hero Props"; used for close-ups and/or shots showing the disassembly or loading of the weapon.
    Electric Non-Gun: Electrically actuated prop which has a motor which moves the slide, kicks out empty brass cartridges, and ignites flash paper contained within the muzzle to simulate muzzle flash. These are custom-built by prop houses, not commercially available, and are often the target of legal action by the real firearm companies since they necessarily resemble the real thing. H&K is particularly bad in this regard.
    Rubber Gun:a rubber or silicone casting of a real firearm, painted to look genuine. Use of these is preferable at all times, unless there is a specific reason to use anything else.

    https://www.fark.com/comments/118571...308#c142982308
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  15. #30
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    Thanks Twitchy. It’s always interesting to see an industry opinion.
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