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Thread: Pete Davidson reveals the emotional truth about his mental illness

  1. #1
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    Default Pete Davidson reveals the emotional truth about his mental illness

    Pete Davidson is opening up about his mental-health battle in an emotional conversation with Glenn Close.

    Davidson, 27, sat down with the 73-year-old acting legend for Variety’s intimate Actors on Actors series.

    During the revealing interview, Close bonded with the “King of Staten Island” and “Saturday Night Live” star over the subject of mental illness in relation to the 2020 film “Hillbilly Elegy,” in which she co-stars with Amy Adams.

    “When somebody finally tells you, the weight of the world feels lifted off your shoulders,” Davidson told Close of his own borderline personality disorder (BDP) diagnosis. “You feel so much better.”

    Close, an outspoken crusader for mental-health awareness, in turn revealed to Davidson that her sister struggled for years before learning she had bipolar disorder — at 50 years old.

    “I think [‘Hillbilly Elegy’] was a very honest view of addiction and the terrible difficulty of getting out of that cycle,” said the seven-time Oscar nominee. “In my family, my sister was a substance abuser, and because we weren’t close at the time, I really didn’t know what she was going through.”

    The three-time Emmy winner added, “If she had been diagnosed sooner, it would have made such a big difference in her life.”

    Davidson praised “Hillbilly Elegy” and Close’s performance for the film’s “spot-on” portrayal of mental illness and addiction.

    The actor, who recently headlined a live charity reading of “It’s a Wonderful Life,” was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder in 2017, and also struggled with substance abuse and high-profile dating issues. By that point, Davidson had already soared to stardom since his joining the “SNL” cast in 2014.

    “I’m glad that your sister got a diagnosis,” Davidson said. “I got diagnosed with BPD a few years ago, and I was always just so confused all the time, and just thought something was wrong, and didn’t know how to deal with it.”

    https://nypost.com/2021/01/27/pete-d...584.1604687787
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    So how does one treat borderline personality disorder? Isn't that what they used to call people with multiple personalities like Eve in "The Three Faces of Eve?"
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    ^^^No, that would be Dissociative identity disorder.
    Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously known as multiple personality disorder (MPD),is a mental disorder characterized by the maintenance of at least two distinct and relatively enduring personality states.The disorder is accompanied by memory gaps beyond what would be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.
    About BPD - I'm sure there are more qualified people here to explain it.

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    BPD does include dissociation & unstable identity as possible symptoms, but it doesn't present as multiple personalities. Dissociation is a learned behavior to cope with the trauma that lead to the development of the disorder. The unstable identity has more to do with boundary issues and a feeling of emptiness; your identity comes from the people around you, which is one reason why abandonment is so terrifying. It's mainly treated with Dialectical Behavior Therapy. I have a friend with BPD, but I don't feel knowledgeable enough to explain most of it. Hopefully this video helps:



    Edited to add: It's a Bipolar vs Borderline vid, because a lot of people confuse the two & the Doc does a good job of explaining it.

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    Thank you for that video, it gave a good explanation.
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    I always thought boderlines were untreatable. Glad to know that has changed, maybe?
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    If they are proactive and stay on their therapy maybe.
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    Apparently DBT is very helpful. My friend loves her therapist & has asked that I accompany her to a session once the pandemic is over. She thinks I have BPD, but I doubt it; I do have one or two of the symptoms, though & could probably also benefit from the therapy. At the very least, I will learn what I can do as a friend to be an ally.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angeli View Post
    So how does one treat borderline personality disorder? Isn't that what they used to call people with multiple personalities like Eve in "The Three Faces of Eve?"
    No, you're thinking of Dissociative Identity Disorder (which was previously known misleadingly as multiple personality disorder).


    https://www.sane.org/information-sto...ality-disorder

    People with BPD typically experience some, but not necessarily all, of these symptoms. See a mental health professional for a proper diagnosis.
    • Feeling empty, low self-esteem
    • Paranoia or emotional detachment
    • Anxiety about relationships, efforts to avoid being abandoned
    • Impulsive, risky behaviour
    • Self-harm, threatening or attempting suicide
    • Anger, moodiness, irritability
    Borderline Personality Disorder is about emotional dysregulation. Due to formative trauma - what it is varies person to person, but usually involves being denied healthy emotional support by a primary care giver - so children of family violence perpetrators, or children of people who are emotionally distant, or people who are emotionally manipulative... you grow up with a some kind of disordered thinking around emotional regulation AND the impact of trauma on a developing brain can impact neurological development so parts of the amygdala and hippocampus (the parts of the brain which regulate emotions) are underformed.

    The way I describe it to people is that the part of my brain that is supposed to control the 'volume' on emotions doesn't work - it's permanently stuck at 11. When I feel an emotion, I feel it full on - it's all or nothing (and nothing - dissociation - is also not healthy).

    Borderlines have maladaptive behaviours that we've learned from coping with abusive situations in not the best way, or maladaptive behaviours that are learned responses to seek out affection. We have a crushing fear of abandonment, but also 'split' on people - so someone who was once your best friend, you might have an otherwise insignificant experience but to the borderline that feels like the start of rejection, so we illogically 'get in first' and push them away. Borderlines often have 'black and white' thinking and find it hard to see shades of grey - which is why radical acceptance is a core part of DBT.

    Until Marsha Linehan came up with Dialectical Behavioural Therapy (DBT), BPD was thought to be 'untreatable' and this is part of the reason that BPD has such terrible stigma even amongst medical and psychiatric professionals. https://psychcentral.com/lib/an-over...havior-therapy

    Schema therapy is also useful, as is mindfulness. DBT usually works best in conjunction with appropriate medication, like mood stabilisers, and SSRI anti depressants - for instance, I'm on Lexapro and have at various times also been prescribed another anti depressant (unfortunately the effect was rather zombifying.... and I piled on weight).

    Borderline Personality Disorder is, let's be honest, really shit for a lot of reasons - it's exhausting, you know that you're "acting crazy" but can't stop yourself from doing it (delusional thinking and hallucinations are rarely part of BPD - impulsivity and frantic efforts to avoid abandonment though.... that causes ALL KINDS OF PROBLEMS!) and the stigma against the disorder is just awful. Too many people hear "borderline" and think "manipulative attention seeking drama queen". Self harm and suicidal ideation is a big problem for BPD, and in part because of the difficulties getting emergency mental health care from a system that all too often dismisses BPD patients as 'attention seeking', unfortunately 10% of patients with BPD will suicide.

    Most BPD specialist hypothesise that Marilyn Monroe and Princess Diana had (possibly undiagnosed and untreated) BPD.

    Successfully managing BPD looks like:
    - stabilising your emotions and learning how to feel the emotion without reacting (let it ride out and then act without influence from the emotion)
    - not nuking all your interpersonal relationships (professional or personal) by swinging wildly e.g. the infamous book title I HATE YOU.... don't leave me...
    - unlearning your maladaptive coping behaviours and substituting more helpful coping behaviours

    It took me a loooooooooooooong time to accept that I'm probably never going to be 'cured'. A 'cure' looks like no longer meeting the diagnostic criteria, especially the frantic efforts to avoid abandonment element. In reality: we are neurodivergent and learn to interact with a world that is not designed for people with strong emotions. It's really hard.
    Lalasnake, lindsaywhit and palta like this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CornFlakegrl View Post
    I always thought boderlines were untreatable. Glad to know that has changed, maybe?
    It's manageable. That's the language my psych encourages me to use. It's a disability, and I manage it. It doesn't own me.

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    Thanks for that, Sassiness, and major props for doing the extraordinarily difficult work necessary to manage it.

    Is it made even more difficult to treat because of not being identified until adulthood? I guess I'm wondering if the same issues that cause BPD (lack of emotional support) would make it more likely the parents would not seek help?


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    I was diagnosed in my early 30s and that was a late diagnosis.

    Part of the issue with getting diagnosed is a two fold issue with the stigma.

    Problem 1: your psych doesn't want to deal with it.

    Because there's plenty of psychs who don't specialise in personality disorders and thus don't keep abreast of all new information, a lot cling to the old notion you shouldn't tell a borderline that they have BPD. The old thinking was it can't be cured so don't tell them.

    I think that the psych I saw in my late 20s was like this. I can't confirm it but my psychiatrist who confirmed the diagnosis and the psychologist who picked up the possibility said it was REALLY obvious, so... its the rational deduction.

    Problem 2: being told that you are, basically, a drama queen who starts arguments and actually is the problem some times is not easy to hear. The first few years of my treatment required a LOT of introspection and humility. Part of the maladaptive behaviours, for me anyway, was doing the same toxic cycles of building up interpersonal relationships and then splitting, turning against the person, and continuing to think it was a coincidence that every person I worked with turned out to be a total arsehole. You know the saying - if everyone around you is an arsehole, maybe you should look in the mirror for the one common factor???

    So not everyone embraces being diagnosed.

    For me, I had the same reaction as Pete Davidson. When it was explained to me properly, as much as it was terrifying, it was also..... OH.... so THAT is why my life is so constantly fucked up. It all makes sense now.

    Realising that you can prevent the cycle from repeating by learning not to make the same mistakes is hard but also ok. I can do something. There's a reason why my emotions are like a roller-coaster.

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    I have a family member who definitely has BPD. This is my layman's diagnosis. The person in question is textbook but will never agree to seeing a therapist or seeing that their comments and behavior are not normal. So the rest of us walk on eggshells. I've done a lot of personal work over the years to learn how to deal with this and not take the personal attacks personally. At the same time, I understand the early family dynamics that created the disorder, so I have great empathy too.
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    Elite Member Sassiness's Avatar
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    A lot of borderlines are reluctant to accept the diagnosis, unfortunately.

    I look back at my pre diagnosis behaviour and cringe. Sometimes I still fall into bad behaviour and then when I realise what I'm doing, I just want to hide under the desk.

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