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Thread: Actor Rutger Hauer (Blade Runner) dead at 75

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    Default Actor Rutger Hauer (Blade Runner) dead at 75

    Source: Variety

    Rutger Hauer, ‘Blade Runner’ Co-Star, Dies at 75

    By Chris Morris







    CREDIT: AGF s.r.l./REX/Shutterstock

    Rutger Hauer, the versatile Dutch leading man of the ’70s who went on star in the 1982 “Blade Runner” as Roy Batty, died July 19 at his home in the Netherlands after a short illness. He was 75.
    Hauer’s agent, Steve Kenis, confirmed the news and said that Hauer’s funeral was held Wednesday.
    His most cherished performance came in a film that was a resounding flop on its original release. In 1982, he portrayed the murderous yet soulful Roy Batty, leader of a gang of outlaw replicants, opposite Harrison Ford in Ridley Scott’s sci-fi noir opus “Blade Runner.” The picture became a widely influential cult favorite, and Batty proved to be Hauer’s most indelible role.
    More recently, he appeared in a pair of 2005 films: as Cardinal Roark in “Sin City,” and as the corporate villain who Bruce Wayne discovers is running the Wayne Corp. in Christopher Nolan’s “Batman Begins.”





    In “True Blood,” he played Niall Brigant, the king of the tribe from which the Stackhouse family is descended and the faerie grandfather to Sookie, Jason Stackhouse and Hunter Savoy. Hauer also recurred on ABC’s medieval musical comedy “Galavant” as Kingsley in 2015.
    He was a natural at horror and vampire roles, starring as Van Helsing in Dario Argento’s “Dracula 3D,” and as the vampire Barlow in the 2004 miniseries adaptation of Stephen King’s “Salem’s Lot” along with Rob Lowe, Andre Braugher and Donald Sutherland.

    Handsome, energetic and fluent in several languages, Hauer made his first mark in the late ‘60s in the Netherlands as the star of Paul Verhoeven’s medieval TV series “Floris.” He vaulted to the top ranks of Dutch stardom in 1973 opposite Monique van de Ven in Verhoeven’s sexually explosive drama “Turkish Delight,” which became a box-office smash and garnered an Oscar nod as best foreign film.
    After three more Dutch features with Verhoeven that became art-house successes in the U.S., Hauer segued to a Hollywood career with a flashy role as a terrorist in the 1981 Sylvester Stallone thriller “Nighthawks.”
    Hauer increasingly turned to action-oriented parts in the ‘80s: He toplined the big-budget fantasy “Ladyhawke” (1985), reteamed with fellow Hollywood transplant Verhoeven in the sword-and-armor epic “Flesh & Blood” (1985), starred as a psychotic killer in “The Hitcher” (1986), and took Steve McQueen’s shotgun-toting bounty hunter role in a modern reboot of the TV Western “Wanted: Dead or Alive” (1986).
    His major artistic triumph came in Ermanno Olmi’s Italian production “The Legend of the Holy Drinker” (1988); his sensitive turn as a homeless drunk and petty criminal who finds redemption in Paris carried the feature, which collected the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival.
    During the ‘90s, Hauer gravitated to more routine roles in American and international productions and played the vampire lord Lothos in the original film version of “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.”
    He debuted as a small screen star as Nazi official Albert Speer in the 1982 telefilm adaptation of Speer’s book “Inside the Third Reich.” His most admired TV work came in projects that turned on World War II themes: He received Golden Globe nominations for his performances as the leader of a concentration camp revolt in “Escape From Sobibor” (1987) and an SS officer in the alternate-universe drama “Fatherland” (1994).





    He was born Jan. 23, 1944, in Breukelen, the Netherlands, near Amsterdam. Though both his parents were acting teachers, he took a circuitous route to the craft. He ran away from home at 15 to join the Dutch merchant navy; after returning to Amsterdam in 1962 he briefly studied acting, but exited school again for a stint in the army.
    Finally committing himself to the stage, he became a member of the touring experimental troupe Noorder Compagnie, in which he acted, directed and served as costume designer and translator for several years.
    His major break came in 1969 when Verhoeven cast him in the title role of “Floris,” an Ivanhoe-like knight who becomes embroiled in court intrigue upon his return from the Crusades. The show proved wildly popular, and Hauer reprised the part in a 1975 revival of the series, “Floris von Rosemund.”
    By that time, the steamy, affecting “Turkish Delight” had firmly established him as the Netherlands’ top B.O. attraction. He reunited with Verhoeven and his co-star van de Ven for the period drama “Katie Tippel” (1975); he renewed his collaboration with the director with the World War II saga “Soldier of Orange” (1977) and the bold contemporary drama “Spetters” (1980).
    Hauer made an almost immediate and intense impression as Batty in his sophomore American feature “Blade Runner,” an adaptation of Philip K. Dick’s “Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?” He wrote his own dialog for the film’s climactic face-off with his adversary Ford. Though the film swiftly fell off screens, it remains a genre landmark today, in no small measure because of Hauer’s electrifying performance.
    Olmi’s “The Legend of the Holy Drinker” brought him possibly the best notices of his career, but it failed to attract great attention beyond art-house audiences, and Hauer soon became a familiar and prolific supporting player in a variety of genre pictures, several of which went direct to home video. He shot seven features in 2001 alone.





    He was active in social causes as an outspoken sponsor of the environmental organization Greenpeace and the founder the Starfish Association, a non-profit devoted to AIDS awareness.
    He is survived by his second wife of 50 years, Ineke ten Cate, and a daughter, actress Aysha Hauer, from his marriage to Heidi Merz.

    Rutger Hauer [Actor]
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    I think a fitting epitaph for Hauer would be what is considered one of the greatest lines in movie history, as his character runs out of time in "Bladerunner". He actually improved the best part of it:

    "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die."

    <span style="font-family: sans-serif; font-size: 14px;">

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    Source: Rolling Stone


    Rutger Hauer, ‘Blade Runner’ Actor, Dead at 75

    Dutch actor famously played sci-fi classic’s replicant Roy Batty, starred in The Hitcher, Sin City, Hobo With a Shotgun




    Rutger Hauer, the Dutch actor best known for his turn as the replicant Roy Batty in Blade Runner, died last Friday at his home in the Netherlands, the actor’s agent, Steve Kenis, confirmed to Rolling Stone. He was 75.
    While Kenis did not give a cause of death, Variety reported that Hauer died after a short illness. His funeral was held Wednesday.
    While Hauer spent the early part of his career acting in a variety of films and television shows in the Netherlands and Britain, Blade Runner marked just his second role in an American film. Nevertheless, he made a lasting impression as Roy Batty, the fugitive replicant trying to evade Rick Deckard, the reluctant cop played by Harrison Ford enlisted to track down Batty and his co-conspirators.
    At the end of the film, a dying Batty delivers the famed “tears in rain” monologue, a speech Hauer partly wrote himself. In his autobiography, All Those Moments: Stories of Heroes, Villains, Replicants, and Blade Runners, Hauer recalled that he “wasn’t that happy” with the original page-long monologue that Blade Runner director Ridley Scott had originally planned. So the actor took it upon himself to cut 30 lines from the speech and keep the two he felt were the most poetic. Then he added the most famous line himself, “All those moments will be lost in time, like tears of rain.”

    “What I love about the final sequence is that Roy performs an act of kindness and compassion — saving Decker’s life,” Hauer wrote in All Those Moments. “At the moment Deckard falls, Roy grabs. He doesn’t really have a reason for doing it. In the last speech, which is a speech a lot of people like, he’s still just running programs…. Roy is never a hero, but for a moment he acts like one.”
    Hauer was born in Breukelen in the Netherlands, the son of two drama teachers. While he studied at the Academy for Theater and Dance in Amsterdam, when he was 15 he spent a year working on a freighter, while later he worked as an electrician and served as a combat medic in the Dutch army. As a professional actor, Hauer got his start in an experimental theater troupe, while he notched his first on-camera role in Paul Verhoeven’s 1969 TV series Floris.
    Over the next few years, Hauer worked on an array of film and television projects, notably collaborating with Verhoeven again on Turkish Delight — which helped Hauer score his first English-speaking roles in Britain — and Soldier of Orange. In 1981, Hauer finally made his Hollywood debut when he was cast as the terrorist Wulfgar in Sylvester Stallone’s Nighthawks. Blade Runner was released the following year, and Hauer would go on to spend the next several decades working tirelessly on an array of film and TV projects.
    Among Hauer’s myriad roles, many in a villainous capacity, one of his most notable is a turn in the 1987 British television film, Escape From Sobibor, for which he won a Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor. In 1994, he received another Golden Globe nod for Best Actor in a Miniseries or TV Film for his turn in the World War II drama Fatherland. Hauer also appeared as the titular psychopath in the 1986 horror classic The Hitcher, a spy in Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, a duplicitous cardinal in Sin City and the CEO of Wayne Enterprises in Batman Begins and a blind swordsman in Blind Fury, as well as TV shows like True Blood and Smallville. In 2011, he starred in Hobo With a Shotgun, an over-the-top B-movie homage based on a fake trailer from Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino’s Grindhouse.
    In all, Hauer racked up at least 174 film and TV credits, according to IMDB (seven of those projects haven’t even been released yet). In a 2011 interview with The AV Club, Hauer touched on his love of acting and his desire to keep working, saying, “The profession that I have is so much fun. You’ve been to Sundance — how much fun do you think that is? There’s nothing better for an actor than to be right there with an audience that goes berserk because of the story… If you have moments like that every five years, you can live forever on it, until you die.”

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    Elite Member Sylkyn's Avatar
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    Damn. What a great actor. Rest in peace, sir. You'll be missed.

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    I remember hearing Rutger Hauer was who Anne Rice had in mind for Lestat. But by the time Interview With The Vampire actually made it to the screen he was too old.

    If we're staying true to the book I thought Tom Cruise was too old. And all wrong. But that's another thread entirely.

    Anyway, Anne was right IMO. Young Rutger Hauer would have been a great Lestat!

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    Absolutely one of my favorite movie moments (Bladerunner). I saw him in an airport years (decades!) ago but was too shy to approach him. I always thought he was a terrific actor.
    Last edited by Daphodil; July 24th, 2019 at 05:24 PM. Reason: Was supposed to copy Mo's post. Dumb browser. Dumber user.

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    Rutger Hauer was one of my favorite actors and I'm going to be watching videos of his work for a long time to come.

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    Elite Member Sleuth's Avatar
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    He was probably one of my first celebrity crushes after seeing him in Ladyhawke. Beautiful man and a great actor. RIP.
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    He was hot back in the day...I didn't know that he was sick. So now it's David Hedison, Rutger Hauer....one more.
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    I didn't care for Bladerunner, but Rutger Hauer was an impressive actor. He was also gorgeous. RIP

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    He was one of those actors that seemed ageless. I feel like he's always been around. RIP.

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    I also wanted to mention the guy had the most manly name in modern cinema. "Rutger Hauer"??? I think the the only thing more manly would be something like "Smash McLivershredder"
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    Elite Member Bluebonnet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MsDark View Post
    I remember hearing Rutger Hauer was who Anne Rice had in mind for Lestat. But by the time Interview With The Vampire actually made it to the screen he was too old.

    If we're staying true to the book I thought Tom Cruise was too old. And all wrong. But that's another thread entirely.

    Anyway, Anne was right IMO. Young Rutger Hauer would have been a great Lestat!

    Meow!!! He needs a spots in the Hot Guys Thread.
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    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    He already has a thread there, started in 2006.
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