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Thread: Dr. Dre Apologizes To All The Women Hes Abused In The Past

  1. #1
    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    Default Dr. Dre Apologizes To All The Women Hes Abused In The Past



    For Dr. Dre, this summer was meant to be a victory lap in a successful career. “Straight Outta Compton,” a biopic about his hip-hop group, N.W.A., topped the box office last week with a $56.1 million opening.. “Compton,” his first album in 16 years, debuted at No. 2 on the Billboard chart. Last year, the music company that Dr. Dre helped establish, Beats, was sold to Apple for $3 billion, making him the self-proclaimed “first billionaire in hip-hop.”

    But critics charge that the movie, which was co-produced by Dr. Dre, glosses over N.W.A.’s record of misogyny and ignores Dr. Dre’s history of physically abusing women. In a sign that the uproar was threatening not only his reputation but also his business dealings, Dr. Dre, who has previously spoken dismissively or vaguely about the decades-old episodes, confronted them on Friday in a statement to The New York Times. While he did not address each allegation individually, he said: “Twenty-five years ago I was a young man drinking too much and in over my head with no real structure in my life. However, none of this is an excuse for what I did. I’ve been married for 19 years and every day I’m working to be a better man for my family, seeking guidance along the way. I’m doing everything I can so I never resemble that man again.”

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    Corey Hawkins as Dr. Dre, in a scene from the film, “Straight Outta Compton."

    He added: “I apologize to the women I’ve hurt. I deeply regret what I did and know that it has forever impacted all of our lives.”
    Apple, where Dr. Dre, 50, now works as a top consultant, also issued a statement: “Dre has apologized for the mistakes he’s made in the past and he’s said that he’s not the same person that he was 25 years ago. We believe his sincerity and after working with him for a year and a half, we have every reason to believe that he has changed.”
    This is the latest case of a celebrity who, partly because of the Internet, has been forced to face old abuse allegations. And for the accusers, Dr. Dre’s statement may be an acknowledgment of what they said decades ago.

    In interviews with The Times this week, the women at the center of the allegations — the hip-hop journalist Dee Barnes; Michel’le, an R&B singer and Dr. Dre’s former girlfriend; and Tairrie B, a onetime labelmate — spoke about the abuse and about how social media had helped them connect and spread their stories.
    “I’ve been talking about my abuse for many, many years, but it has not gotten any ears until now,” said Michel’le, who was romantically involved with Dr. Dre from the late-’80s until the mid-’90s. (They have an adult son.)
    During that time, she said, he was often physically abusive, hitting her with a closed fist and leaving “black eyes, a cracked rib and scars.” Michel’le said she never pressed charges because, “We don’t get that kind of education in my culture.”
    She added, “Opening up and finding out there were other women like me gave me the power to speak up.”
    Tairrie B, a.k.a Tairrie B. Murphy, said that Dr. Dre punched her twice in the face at a Grammys after-party in 1990 after she recorded a track insulting him.

    She connected with Ms. Barnes through Facebook last year. “I said, ‘Hey girl, I think we have something in common, and we’ve never talked about it,’ ” Ms. Murphy said.
    Ms. Barnes recalled being brought to tears by that message and a subsequent hourslong phone conversation with Ms. Murphy. Both women were writing memoirs — Ms. Barnes’s is tentatively titled “Music, Myth and Misogyny” — but did not expect to wage a public campaign against Dr. Dre, she said.
    “The initial conversation was like group therapy, to heal our wounds,” Ms. Barnes said.

    As the Aug. 14 release of “Straight Outta Compton” approached, others started the discussion. A blog post from last year by the rap writer Byron Crawford, titled “Beatings by Dre,” began to circulate again on Twitter and Facebook, while a Gawker post headlined “Remember When Dr. Dre Bashed a Female Journalist’s Face Against a Wall?” was published on July 31 and was viewed nearly 300,000 times. (In format, it mirrored a Gawker article from early 2014: “Who Wants to Remember Bill Cosby’s Multiple Sex-Assault Accusations?”)

    At a panel for “Straight Outta Compton” this month, the film’s director, F. Gary Gray, was asked why the film omitted Ms. Barnes’s story, in which Dr. Dre confronted her at a party in 1991 about an N.W.A. segment on her Fox show “Pump It Up!”

    According to a statement Ms. Barnes issued at the time, Dr. Dre began punching her in the head and “slamming her face and the right side of her body repeatedly against a wall.” (Charged with assault and battery, he pleaded no contest. He was sentenced to community service and probation, fined $2,500 and ordered to make a domestic violence P.S.A.; a civil suit was settled out of court.)

    Mr. Gray said at the panel that the filmmakers had “talked about it at the beginning” — the scene appeared in an early script — but ultimately decided the movie “wasn’t about a lot of side stories.” He added, “You can make five different N.W.A. movies — we made the one we wanted to make.” (Through Universal Studios, Mr. Gray declined to comment.)

    Sensing the renewed interest, Ms. Murphy encouraged Ms. Barnes to tell her side. “It’s about finally getting the truth out there,” Ms. Murphy said.
    On Tuesday, Ms. Barnes published an essay on Gawker about the film and her assault that was seen more than 1.6 million times. “I suffer from horrific migraines that started only after the attack,” she wrote. “My head does ring and it hurts, exactly in the same spot every time where he smashed my head against the wall.”
    She called the movie “revisionist history,” lamenting the women, including Ms. Murphy and Michel’le, who were written out. The movie “wasn’t reality and it wasn’t gangster,” Ms. Barnes said. “Gangster would have been to show everything.”
    As a white, female rapper signed to Ruthless Records, N.W.A.’s record label, Ms. Murphy said she had been expected to collaborate with Dr. Dre, but resisted his creative control. “He was very nasty to me constantly,” she said, and so she decided to address his chauvinism on the song “Ruthless Bitch.”

    When Dr. Dre said at a crowded party that he’d heard the track, the pair began arguing. “I stood up to him, and I didn’t back down,” Ms. Murphy said. “He kept saying, ‘If you say one more word to me ...” Then, she said, “he punched me right in the mouth and again in the eye.”
    While Ms. Murphy did not file a police report — “There’s no excuse, but this was a different time,” she said — a meeting was scheduled the next day with Eazy-E, a founder of N.W.A., and Jerry Heller, N.W.A.’s manager and a founder of Ruthless. “I was told, ‘This is a family business — you’re not pressing charges,” she said. “I was taken care of by Eazy in certain ways to be quiet.” (Mr. Heller did not respond to requests for comment. Eazy-E died in 1995.)
    After Ms. Murphy reconnected with Ms. Barnes, “I had a lot of guilt,” she said. “Had I pressed charges, he would have had a strike against him. And maybe Michel’le would have stood up, too. Maybe it would have made him think.”

    Since the attack, Ms. Barnes said that she has had trouble finding work in the entertainment industry: “His career continued, where mine dwindled. People side with the money.”

    Still, she rejects those who say coming forward again now is opportunistic. “What opportunity?” she said. “Show me the opportunities.”
    She added, “They brought up the past” by making the film. “Not me.”
    Michel’le agreed. “They told their story,” she said. “I’m telling mine.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/08/22/ar...hurt.html?_r=1

  2. #2
    Gold Member bootspaige's Avatar
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    funny how he makes an entire movie with cube and doesn't show any part of this, but now that he is under fire, and has the deal with Apple, he comes out with an apology. i enjoyed SOC, just lost respect once i realized the picture painted of Dre was far from who he really was. That said, if he is reformed, remorseful, and willing to make a difference, then good for him. Those he left in his wake should be vindicated.

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    This is a tough one. I hate him for the abuse he inflicted on women (and others) in his past, but on the other hand he has made a lot of effort to amend who he formerly was, and by all standards these days is a great guy. If he is truly apologetic and and continues to work at being a better person then I have to give credit where credit's due.
    I would, however, like to see him set up some type of charitable foundation for abused women.
    "You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    if he really had made efforts to amend who he formerly was, he would have included those incidents in the movie. but he didn't. he thought he could get away with whitewashing his past but when it started to affect him, then it was time to apologise...
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

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    He's been in AA for several years and supposedly has made amends to many of the women and set them up with financial amends as well, so I'd like to believe that he's changed. But it could be an act... I don't know. I believe in second chances after drugs and alcohol.
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    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    It's easy to pay people off when you are super wealthy. This is what happens all the time. It doesn't negate the hurt and humiliation he caused in the past.
    Last edited by rollo; August 22nd, 2015 at 07:02 AM.
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    Yeah, he's sorry. He's sorry he can't control the narrative anymore.

    The abuse was in the script for the film, but was removed.

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    He may have changed (I hope so) but like Sputnik said, he's whitewashing the story. The movie would have been a perfect time to show how he changed by being truthful, owning his past, and showing his transformation.
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    I read a long time ago an interview where Dee Barnes said she didn't press charges because she wanted Dre to produce her album, kind of an exchange deal. When he refused she then filed a 22.7 million dollar lawsuit. It was settled out of court for an undisclosed amount.

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    Dee Barnes is the one causing so much noise about his abuse of women like there weren't people still around who remember her saying "he won't produce my album" all over her late night video shows! If was such a mysoginistic asshole to you before he hit you why did you want him involved at ALL and especially afterwards! Now, the abuse of Michel'le, grant it she didn't mention this until her Diva's reality show but her money and notoriety really increased once it aired!
    He did acknowledge the Dee Barnes incident in a song with Eminem.
    I think I have said that NWA and Eazy E got me through my recoveries in rehabilitation and therapy for my leg... I still say you aren't what you listen too!!
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    Quote Originally Posted by *DIVA! View Post
    Dee Barnes is the one causing so much noise about his abuse of women like there weren't people still around who remember her saying "he won't produce my album" all over her late night video shows! If was such a mysoginistic asshole to you before he hit you why did you want him involved at ALL and especially afterwards! Now, the abuse of Michel'le, grant it she didn't mention this until her Diva's reality show but her money and notoriety really increased once it aired!
    He did acknowledge the Dee Barnes incident in a song with Eminem.
    I think I have said that NWA and Eazy E got me through my recoveries in rehabilitation and therapy for my leg... I still say you aren't what you listen too!!
    It sounds like you know a lot about it, but not everyone does.

    A lot of people don't remember anything about Dee Barnes or never heard of her in the first place, and a lot of people weren't thinking about Dr. Dre either. People who know very little about him are going to see this film. Some of them are too young to know all this. So the film has people interested in his story, and maybe it stands to reason that some women from his past are saying, wait, that's not the story -- at least not the whole one. I've seen people I know on Facebook, for example, saying stuff like, oh, I went to see this film and thought it was good, and now I'm seeing these stories about abusiveness afterward, and I had no idea.

    My opinion: I won't fault anyone for being quiet about their abuse when they believe they need to be, and I won't fault them for talking about it, and I won't begrudge them the timing if they decide to talk about it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by *DIVA! View Post
    Dee Barnes is the one causing so much noise about his abuse of women like there weren't people still around who remember her saying "he won't produce my album" all over her late night video shows! If was such a mysoginistic asshole to you before he hit you why did you want him involved at ALL and especially afterwards! Now, the abuse of Michel'le, grant it she didn't mention this until her Diva's reality show but her money and notoriety really increased once it aired!
    He did acknowledge the Dee Barnes incident in a song with Eminem.
    I think I have said that NWA and Eazy E got me through my recoveries in rehabilitation and therapy for my leg... I still say you aren't what you listen too!!
    Well the statements made by Dre, Easy and company made after are pretty reprehensible. "Bitch got what she deserved." And "Aint no big thing threw her through a door".

    In Guilty Conscience Eminem says, "you gonna take advice from the man who slapped Dee Barnes?". He did a lot more than slap the woman.

    The Rolling Stone blurb about the attack goes into graphic detail. Dres bodyguard was waving g a gun at bystanders and Dre was unsuccessful at throwing Dee down the stairs. He beat the shit out of her.

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    He's in AA? Well, he needs to start the 12 step program again because he is not doing it right

    5 Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

    Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

    Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

    Continued to take personal inventory, and when we were wrong, promptly admitted it..




    I dont think that hes changed, he just realises the (business) implications & impacts of the wider public opinion.

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