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Thread: News of the World to close amid hacking scandal

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Default News of the World to close amid hacking scandal

    not sure if i should put this in 'news' or 'gossip'. i guess it's news about gossip. mods, feel free to move it if you think it doesn't belong here.

    7 July 2011 Last updated at 19:47 GMT

    News of the World to close amid hacking scandal


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    James Murdoch: "These allegations are shocking and hugely regrettable"

    Continue reading the main story



    This Sunday's edition of the News of the World will be its last, News International chairman James Murdoch has said, after days of increasingly damaging allegations against the paper.
    The 168-year-old tabloid is accused of hacking into the mobile phones of crime victims, celebrities and politicians.
    On Thursday, the Met Police said it was seeking to contact 4,000 possible targets named in seized documents.
    Its editor Colin Myler said it was "the saddest day of my professional career".
    He added that "nothing should diminish everything this great newspaper has achieved".
    The News of the World, which sells about 2.8million copies a week, is famed for its celebrity scoops and sex scandals, earning it the nickname, the News of the Screws.
    Downing Street has said it had no role or involvement in the decision to close.
    Mr Murdoch said no advertisements would run in this weekend's paper - instead any advertising space would be donated to charities and good causes, and proceeds from sales would also go to good causes.
    News International has refused to comment on rumours that the Sun could now become a seven-day-a-week operation.
    "What happens to the Sun is a matter for the future," a spokeswoman for News International said. The Sun, another News International tabloid, is currently published from Monday to Saturday.
    The spokeswoman also refused to say whether the 200 or so employees at the paper would be made redundant, saying: "They will be invited to apply for other jobs in the company."
    At the scene

    Nicola Pearson BBC News, Wapping
    The atmosphere outside News International's Wapping headquarters is one of shock and bewilderment.
    Staff had no idea what was coming - they were told the previous day that the paper would be rebuilding its reputation. Rebekah Brooks was inside the building when the staff were informed that the paper was closing.
    She was apparently in tears, as were many of the journalists. There was said to be a huge amount of anger that Rebekah Brooks has kept her job whilst theirs had been lost.
    Most staff left this evening shaking their heads. One, their political editor, David Wooding spoke to reporters outside. He said he was baffled at the decision, describing the paper as a clean outfit and saying most staff were not working there when the hacking is alleged to have happened.
    This evening, some of the the Sun's journalists - the sister paper to the NoW, told the BBC they were walking out for a short period in solidarity with their colleagues.

    The News of the World's political editor, David Wooding, who joined 18 months ago, said it was a fantastic paper.
    "They cleared out all the bad people. They bought in a great new editor, Colin Myler, and his deputy, Victoria Newton, who had not been sullied by any of the things that had gone on in the past.
    "And there's nobody there, there's hardly anybody there who was there in the old regime."
    The Guardian says that Andy Coulson, formerly David Cameron's director of communications, will be arrested on Friday morning over suspicions that he knew about, or had direct involvement in, the hacking of mobile phones during his time as editor of the News of the World.
    The Guardian also says that a former senior journalist at the paper will also be arrested in the next few days.
    There have been repeated calls for Rebekah Brooks - the former editor, now News International's chief executive - to resign. But in an interview Mr Murdoch stood by her again, saying he was satisfied with her conduct.
    'Serious regret' In a statement made to staff, Mr Murdoch said the good things the News of the World did "have been sullied by behaviour that was wrong - indeed, if recent allegations are true, it was inhuman and has no place in our company".
    "The News of the World is in the business of holding others to account. But it failed when it came to itself."
    He went on: "In 2006, the police focused their investigations on two men. Both went to jail. But the News of the World and News International failed to get to the bottom of repeated wrongdoing that occurred without conscience or legitimate purpose.
    "Wrongdoers turned a good newsroom bad and this was not fully understood or adequately pursued.
    "As a result, the News of the World and News International wrongly maintained that these issues were confined to one reporter.
    "We now have voluntarily given evidence to the police that I believe will prove that this was untrue and those who acted wrongly will have to face the consequences. This was not the only fault.

    "The paper made statements to Parliament without being in the full possession of the facts. This was wrong.
    "The company paid out-of-court settlements approved by me. I now know that I did not have a complete picture when I did so. This was wrong and is a matter of serious regret."
    He said: "So, just as I acknowledge we have made mistakes, I hope you and everyone inside and outside the company will acknowledge that we are doing our utmost to fix them, atone for them, and make sure they never happen again.
    "Having consulted senior colleagues, I have decided that we must take further decisive action with respect to the paper. This Sunday will be the last issue of the News of the World."
    Continue reading the main story Analysis

    Torin Douglas BBC media correspondent
    Monday's revelation that a private investigator had hacked into the phone messages of Milly Dowler brought an entirely new dimension to the phone-hacking saga.
    The targets were no longer celebrities and politician but ordinary people already going through dreadful experiences.
    This morning, as more advertisers pulled out, it became clear many people did not want to be associated with the News of the World.
    But no one foresaw that James Murdoch would close it altogether.
    The Murdoch family have once again shown their power to surprise and to take dramatic decisions. But on reflection, the decision may not have been as difficult as it first appears.
    There is already a substitute Sunday paper waiting in the wings.
    Earlier this month, News International announced a management restructure, making it easier for its papers to move to seven-day working. How long will it be before the Sun is published on Sundays?

    He reiterated that the company was fully co-operating with the two ongoing police investigations.
    He added: "While we may never be able to make up for distress that has been caused, the right thing to do is for every penny of the circulation revenue we receive this weekend to go to organisations that improve life in Britain and are devoted to treating others with dignity."
    The BBC's political editor, Nick Robinson, said that Rupert Murdoch has sacrificed the News of the World - or, at least, its title - instead of the chief executive of News International, Rebekah Brooks.
    "Team Murdoch must have realised that it would be referred to again and again over the next few months in connection with the alleged phone-hacking of a murdered girl, grieving parents and war widows," he said.
    "The question now is whether this will make the government's dilemma about the takeover of BSkyB easier or harder."
    Labour MP Tom Watson told Sky News it was "a victory for decent people up and down the land, and I say good riddance to the News of the World".
    But Justice Secretary Ken Clarke said: "All they're going to do is rebrand it."
    And former deputy prime minister Lord Prescott, who alleged his phone was hacked, thought the decision was simply a gimmick.
    In April, the News of the World admitted intercepting the voicemail messages of prominent people to find stories.
    It came after years of rumours that the practice was widespread and amid intense pressure from those who believed they had been victims.
    Royal editor Clive Goodman and private investigator Glenn Mulcaire were jailed for hacking in January 2007 after it was found they targeted Prince William's aides.
    Detectives recovered files from Mulcaire's home which referred to a long list of public figures and celebrities.
    The scandal widened this week when it emerged that a phone belonging to the murdered schoolgirl Milly Dowler had also been hacked into, and some messages deleted.
    Leading brands, including Sainsbury's, Ford and O2, pulled their newspaper advertising and shares in BSkyB fell on fears that the scandal could hinder parent company News Corp's bid for the broadcaster.
    On Wednesday, the government promised an inquiry in the hacking allegations, but the nature of it is undecided.




    BBC News - News of the World to close amid hacking scandal
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  2. #2
    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    Surprised Fox News didn't try to buy them out. Format's basically the same.
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    fox is a division of news corps which owns the paper i think

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    Quote Originally Posted by SunShine23 View Post
    fox is a division of news corps which owns the paper i think
    yup

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    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    This is good news, but all they'll do is just give the paper a new name and carry on as usual.

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    Hit By Ban Bus! AliceInWonderland's Avatar
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    man I used to read this website and thesun.co.uk religiously! oh well.

    karma's a bitch as they say yes I'm talking to you

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    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AliceInWonderland View Post
    man I used to read this website and thesun.co.uk religiously! oh well.

    karma's a bitch as they say yes I'm talking to you
    The Sun is still carrying on.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarzy View Post
    This is good news, but all they'll do is just give the paper a new name and carry on as usual.
    pretty much yup as well....looks like the sun will go 7 days


    if any of you outwith UK guys can get a copy of bbc's question time i'd recommend watching it, hugh grant is kicking ass lol on the panel

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    Elite Member Dean James's Avatar
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    You'd think that having been caught hacking into phones in the past, they'd not only stop but their editors would actively work to prevent it from happening again. Derp.
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    There is already domain names registered for Sunsunday - rumour has it they wanted to make the Sun 7 days a week to cut costs.
    I think there is more crap to come out soon and there is already links with News Corp's US publications like WSJ whose editor was linked with bribery when he was overlooking these allegations a few years back.

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    Rupert Murdoch. HATE. Yes, he owns Fox News, is killing the once-reputable WSJ, and now he's killed a 168 year old business and put hundreds of people out of work in an attempt to save his bid to takeover SkyNews in Britain. Should ONE man, let alone one hugely corrupt asshole, really be in control of so much of the world's media? UGHHHHH.
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    NOTW will carry on exactly as before but under a new title - The Sun On Sunday or The Sunday Sun seem to be favourites. A few heads will roll but otherwise it will be business as usual. Rupert Murdoch isn't going to close down a business that earns over 30million quid a year as a gesture of remorse.
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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dean James View Post
    You'd think that having been caught hacking into phones in the past, they'd not only stop but their editors would actively work to prevent it from happening again. Derp.
    It's been going on for a long time, Milly Dowler died in 2002 Murder of Milly Dowler when Rebakka Brooks (then Wade) was editor I believe. Most of this happened on her "watch" which must be why there is so much anger about her.


    The Sun is rightwing racist shit & deserves to die tainted by this scandal (as well as notw).

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    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    It's been going on for a long time, Milly Dowler died in 2002 Murder of Milly Dowler when Rebakka Brooks (then Wade) was editor I believe. Most of this happened on her "watch" which must be why there is so much anger about her.


    The Sun is rightwing racist shit & deserves to die tainted by this scandal (as well as notw).
    I know, Novice. I can't believe she is keeping her job while her staff are losing theirs. Hmm.

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    Silver Member Jen84's Avatar
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    NOTW is a rag for the lowest common denominator. Good riddance.

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