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Thread: Typical architectural styles around the world

  1. #16
    A*O
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    Typical UK 2-up/2-down terrace cottages. Most were built during the 19th century industrial revolution to house factory workers in large towns and cities. There used to be endless rows of them but many became slums and were demolished to make way for hideous 1950/1960s concrete blocks of flats where the social problems were exacerbated even more. Generally speaking people still prefer to live in a house, even a small one, rather than a flat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post
    Palta, except for the cheap contemporary buildings, your pictures reminded me of how much I love buenos aires! I miss living in south America in large part because I can't go to buenos aires for long weekends anymore.
    That's nice. I'm glad you like it.
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    tati is right about all the different styles in canada.
    i grew up in a neighbourhood called the glebe in ottawa. just north of downtown so residential but super centric. lots of late 19th and early 20th century houses and brick commercial buildings and schools.
    there are similar houses in toronto and other residential areas inside of larger canadian cities, which is where most people lived before suburban sprawl started.
    lots of brick, lots of porches, a mish-mash of styles and influences.










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    ^ that top brick house reminds me of lots of parts of Brooklyn that aren't brownstones- much of Queens is that style as well.
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    Elite Member palta's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sputnik View Post




    I love these balconies.

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    I love Canadian basements. My sister used to live in Calgary and both places she lived in had cozy basements that made those brutal winters a bit easier to endure as staying indoors a lot was more or less essential. She now lives in a more temperate Vancouver Island but still has a fab basement. It's such a useful space.

    Aussie homes don't generally have them but lots of new builds now have basement garages so they can cram even more house onto the available land, often right up to the boundary. It's depressing to see the huge new McMansion developments where the houses are packed in so tight there isn't a tree or lawn in sight. Instead there's a forest of huge aircon units on the roofs. Not a great carbon footprint!
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    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Aussie homes don't generally have them but lots of new builds now have basement garages so they can cram even more house onto the available land, often right up to the boundary. It's depressing to see the huge new McMansion developments where the houses are packed in so tight there isn't a tree or lawn in sight. Instead there's a forest of huge aircon units on the roofs. Not a great carbon footprint!
    It is depressing and it also explains why a lot of kids are obese - they don't have backyards or bushland to run around in because they reclaimed the bush to build the housing estates. I don't know why families need so much indoor space - do 5 people really need 4 living areas?
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    Buenos Aires is as beautiful as any city I've ever seen.

    Typical North Philly block of rowhouses:


    Center City:


    West Philly:


    Germantown:


    New rowhomes in South Philly, near my house:
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    I grew up in rural Ontario, Canada. The typical farmhouses around here are, if built in the 1800s, stone or brick and feature a symmetrical front with a central dormer with peaked window above the front door. Like this:




    This one has seen better days but is a good representation of how many grew as the size of the family did. The original house is on the left and the addition is the right half. The new part is probably from about 1900.


    After the turn of the century, houses tended to be the full two stories and there tends to be no stone and less brick used as cheaper board sidings took over.



    Between WW1 and WW2 there really wasn't a lot of new building. Farms were established already. A couple of generations had already taken off for the city and farming was no longer profitable. New farmhouses were cheaper and smaller.



    Further rural flight after WW2. I don't recall seeing any buildings put up in the fifties.

    Then came the chopping up of farms for country lots in the 1960s and 1970s which caused a whole bunch of these:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tati View Post






    Now the McMansions are moving in.
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    ^ I love those old farmhouses, Twitchy. I always used to imagine they'd be rather spacious, but I've been in a few now and have been surprised by how small the original ones often are. So charming, though. I'm a sucker for half-storeys and dormers.
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    Bedrooms tended to be particularly tiny. People didn't have as much clothing to store and just used them for sleeping I guess. And there was no insulation in those old bastards!
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    Did i tell you how much i love this thread?Thank you all for the pictures!
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    Love the Ontario farmhouses.

    Here's a classic Aussie pub/hotel. You will find at least one of these iconic buildings in most towns and often built on a corner like this. Basically a place for drinking, something to eat and with basic accommodation too. City pubs tend no to have the balconies and verandas but it depends when they were built.



    The 19th century gold rush made Victoria a very wealthy state so people were able to build substantial public and private buildings. The small country towns of Bendigo and Ballarat, both gold mining centres, have some magnificent civic buildings as does Melbourne.

    Here's the famous Shamrock Hotel in Bendigo. It looks almost like a French chateau. We stayed there a couple of years ago and it was very atmospheric, including the bar brawl!

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    ^ That pub looks kind of "Old West", A*O! Maybe Gold Rush stuff is similar everywhere.

    Further rural flight after WW2. I don't recall seeing any buildings put up in the fifties.
    Even in the towns, my mom always refers to "post war" houses, and they tend to be small, closely clustered, and perfunctory. Still around and often nicely renovated, but also often near factories and other "original" areas of town rather than nicer subdivisions or suburbs. I never really thought about the fact that in the country, perhaps nothing new was built at all.

    Wee post war city house:

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    Post war UK "pre-fab" as in pre-fabricated homes built mostly from asbestos, eeeek. Those were the days! Cheap, quick housing was needed after German bombs flattened large areas of many cities. The pre-fabs were gradually replaced with more substantial (and safer) brick homes but even now there are a few examples left.

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