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Thread: The plants/gardening thread!

  1. #241
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    I have 4 fig trees, Kutoba and Mission, here in Bedford NY. I used to have Brown Turkeys which I would dig up and overwinter in the window of the unheated garage. But 3 years ago when we had the 65* January followed by the 10* February, they gave up the ghost. The way I deal with them now is a bit involved, but it woks well. I leave them in the ground, tie them up with twine, roll fiberglass house insulation around them, and then wrap them in plastic sheeting. It's then all topped off with an upside down bucket to keep the rain from getting into the insulation, because of the mold issue. This technique has worked very well the past three seasons, no winter kill at all. My new frustration is that the last 2 years I had lots of small figs that never quite ripened because of the cool August. We gardeners are at the mercy of the weather.

  2. #242
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    Thanks- do you plant in sandy soil? I have to stop and talk to the Italian gardener who taught me how to prune the wisterias. His figs are by his bread oven and he doesn't pull them inside for the winter.
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  3. #243
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Does anyone think wealthy yuppie hipster environtards will buy Malabar spinach, Jerusalem Artichoke, Groundnut, Herb(various), Egyptian Walking Onion, and Alpine strawberry plants along with regular veggies/veggie plants at an urban historical farmers market in the 'happenin' part of town?

    just asking' y'all...

    *I am already starting to hate my coworker/new small business partners in this stupid farmers market/growing shit on rural land thing. I just knew not to mix such a great hobby with 'work'. shit.
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  4. #244
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    Yep. I'm not in an happening area- but it would work out in my area. I go to a little Italian man's home to buy some plants.

    Are you selling plants or produce? I'm still not sure.
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  5. #245
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    My soil is very clay. So I plant the figs in the highest spot, which give them good drainage and is also the warmest microclime on the property. I also fill the hole with composted horse manure.

  6. #246
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zee View Post
    Yep. I'm not in an happening area- but it would work out in my area. I go to a little Italian man's home to buy some plants.

    Are you selling plants or produce? I'm still not sure.
    Both.

    Groups are:

    1. Native wildflower plants for different areas (prairie/dry/sun. moist forest woodland, etc.)

    2. Unusual or ornamental edible plants (Sunchokes, Red Malabar spinach, Ground nuts, topset onions, Garlic chives, etc.)

    3. Vegatable and herb produce (cool season stuff like radishes, carrots, peas, then warm season stuff like New Zealand spinach, peppers, tomatoes, etc. plus some culinary and nonculinary(like Sweet Annie) herb produce(not plants)

    One person is focusing on the first group(number 1), another(me) is focusing n number 2, and the third person is focusing on number 3.

    All grown with organic principles and biodegradable materials in mind.

    We want a variety of things this first year to see what works and what doesn't work, ya know?

    I will not have a weekend off from June to October. Shit! Rotating between working weekends at the market and working at my regular job. That will really suck! But oh well. It should be fun..er..well..at least 'interesting'.

    *I already have over 100 Topset/walking onion plants potted and growng, and all from my own garden(to help save on my costs..some of my stuff is coming from my own garden or I am growing from seed.)
    They look something like this:

    http://image14.webshots.com/15/8/65/...9yJPySC_fs.jpg

    they sell online for two to five dollars for a three inch plant..and mine are in three inch containers..by June I may have to plant them in larger ones..

    Of course people will have to want to buy them, but if not, then I just have that many more plants(they multiply) to have and try to sell again-they are very hardy and can sit out over winter in pots. I left some bulbs sitting out on a patio table all winter long(-18 F) and then planted them-they are coming up nicely.
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  7. #247
    A*O
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    Natives plants are becoming much more popular now as people realise how many fantastic varieties there are and how easy they are to look after once established. It has to make sense planting things suited to the local climate, soil and environment than trying to create a garden using plants that will be very high maintenance and likely to die anyway. I have a native garden with drought tolerant plants and it pretty much looks after itself.

    As for veggies, tomatoes are always a winner, especially the more unusual varieties. Our local farmers market sells seedlings for all kinds of tomatoes, big and small, and they always sell out. People like them because they are fairly easy to grow, don't require a lot of space and you cannot beat the taste and smell of a tomato picked fresh off the vine.

    Good luck Soj - your project sounds like fun and think of all those hot Colin lookalike gardening types who'll come and inspect your wares!
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  8. #248
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Well I am trying to get out there some unusual but interesting edibles that are versatile, native, perennial, and the type that you normally will not find available as a plant, but have to grow yourself from a bulb, tuber, or seed. You know many people do not want to grow the plant, just buy the plant (like with tomatoes) already going and growing in a pot. Hope that is a selling point. They will be sold in biodegradable paper pots so they can be just set into the pot or garden without disturbing the plant at planting time.

    We shall see how it goes. Also will be selling some alpine strawberry plants, mostly white fruited varieties. Not native, but great, versatile, hardy perennial plants hard to find(both plant and fruit). Might appeal to the type of crowd expected.

    *mmmm..Champagne with alpine strawberries!!! yum!

    *Still working 60 hours a week at regular job though..so I will not have much of a social life this spring and summer at all..with work, with this thing, working in my own garden, and working in my dads new expanded garden(he cut down a huge 3 foot thick maple to make room). Not that I would have much of a social life anyway mind you.. practically a monk here.
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  9. #249
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    Just make sure you only plant 1/4 of the amount of strawberry plants you want to have. They spread like wildfire!

  10. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sojiita View Post
    Well I am trying to get out there some unusual but interesting edibles that are versatile, native, perennial, and the type that you normally will not find available as a plant, but have to grow yourself from a bulb, tuber, or seed. You know many people do not want to grow the plant, just buy the plant (like with tomatoes) already going and growing in a pot. Hope that is a selling point. They will be sold in biodegradable paper pots so they can be just set into the pot or garden without disturbing the plant at planting time.

    We shall see how it goes. Also will be selling some alpine strawberry plants, mostly white fruited varieties. Not native, but great, versatile, hardy perennial plants hard to find(both plant and fruit). Might appeal to the type of crowd expected.

    *mmmm..Champagne with alpine strawberries!!! yum!

    *Still working 60 hours a week at regular job though..so I will not have much of a social life this spring and summer at all..with work, with this thing, working in my own garden, and working in my dads new expanded garden(he cut down a huge 3 foot thick maple to make room). Not that I would have much of a social life anyway mind you.. practically a monk here.
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  11. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter View Post
    Just make sure you only plant 1/4 of the amount of strawberry plants you want to have. They spread like wildfire!
    yep, I wanted them as a natural runner along the walkway now they have taken over and the rabbits eat them before I get a chance to pick them or they turn ripe.

    We have some beautiful rhododendron bushes, we've had them for years but finally last year they bloomed. This year the neighbors dog Hershey jumped our 4 foot chain link fence and beat the heck out of them. I don't know how to deal with this because his owners are having health and money issues and I'm afraid if I tell them what happened they might get rid of him and he's a wonderful dog.... except for jumping our darn fence. He keeps landing on the rhododendrons.

    We also worked our asses off and built a fish pond. Our wee little fishes are finally 6 inches long and then this new chick moves in with her cats and now I have 2 fishes. grrr I have 3 dogs but she lets her cats out at night.

    I'm realizing I have some crappy neighbors.

    We planted a garden again this year. However we've had a week of rain and another week of rain on the way so I'm not sure if they will survive or not.

  12. #252
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    If it's really wet and consistantly damp plant hostas. Loads of varieties and very tough but unfortunately the slugs just LOVE them. I can highly recommend Beth Chatto's book "The Damp Garden". I used to have a copy but have absolutely NO use for it in this dought-stricken place LOL
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  13. #253
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scooter View Post
    Just make sure you only plant 1/4 of the amount of strawberry plants you want to have. They spread like wildfire!
    Well these alpine strawberries are not like the regular kind. They do not spread by runners, but are clump forming and slowly grow larger. They are perfect for containers and edging, and are very hardy. And...they are infested with aphids I have found out.

    Will try Neem oil spray on them. It falls under 'organic pest control' I believe since it is a plant extract and thus a natural pest deterrent.


    *Geez..it is almost impossible to find a damn groundnut online(Apios Americana. They are sold out everywhere, especially the good Lousiana cultivars, and as the rest, a measly one or two inch tuber is going for ten freakin' dollars! I contacted one place that has the really good cultivar I want and (If I make the waiting list) I might be able to get ONE tuber..around November. shit!

    ***Any of you southerners got access to any of these Lousiana State and University of Southern Lousiana cultivars of Apios Americana locally? ME WANT!!!!


    tubers: (I want the larger cultivar though) http://www.fotothing.com/photos/2c5/...11fd633459.jpg

    Plant: http://full.warrenr.com/maryrowlands...nfullbloom.jpg

    in the half whiskey barrel on the right: http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1346/...4ee495.jpg?v=0
    Last edited by Sojiita; March 30th, 2009 at 07:07 AM.
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  14. #254
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Guess this thread is dead. Might as well make it the 'Home and Decorating Thread". I guess nobody is gardening, or wants to discuss it on here.

    If anyone cares, I am going to be a member of my county's "County Producers Association" and sell at a farmer's market. Mostly the unusual stuff I think I had mentioned. I have about 200 plants already potted up. I think I am going to combine them to make maybe 100 plants for now..more later.
    Some are going to be in large pots, and others small pots so if people do not want to spend the money on the large one, they can start with the small one.

    I separated from my partners and am going it alone(it is only fifty bucks to sell not only at the site every Saturday till December(normal advertised time), but also anytime during the day from May 1st till December.). They are still in it as well, and we may set up together on off days and will still help each other. What I am doing is so different from what they are doing it made sense to split -I do not want to drag them down.

    And what is to lose? I already have the plants(most from divisions of stuff I already have) and it is only fifty bucks..plus I am not OBLIGATED to do anything like I would be if in a partnership. Plus at the first meeting some of the people said they wanted more diversity from the regular crafts and produce....

    My neighbors are also providing planting/container growing space for me so I am not overrun. Will do some work for them on their gardens to compensate.

    Nice day..going to go out and work on this crap. As soon as I get off of this site!

    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  15. #255
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    I am completely new to gardening and wanted to try my hand at a small vegetable garden. I have about a 2x3 plot and so I bought some tomatoes, lettuce and a few herbs. I might have bought too much lettuce though.

    On a plus side for my non-green thumb.... last year I planted a hydrangea, which I thought I killed (it looked like sticks in the ground). I just left it alone, and now I see some green leaves popping up!

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