Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 29

Thread: New approaches to cottaging

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Your Pocket
    Posts
    18,087

    Default New approaches to cottaging

    It's a grand and uniquely Canadian tradition: spending the summer kicking back at the cottage.

    But with vacation home prices hurtling into the stratosphere, what's a cash-strapped urban escapist-wannabe to do?

    There's a host of creative and cost-effective options for those who hear the call of the wild but are just too broke to answer.

    Condo-cottages, fractional ownership cottages, moored boats, trailers, timeshares or even sharing the cost of a place with friends or family are some of the many ways to own a cottage without busting the bank.

    Forget that budget-mangling multi-million dollar pile in Muskoka. Now, many are finding that be it ever so humble, there's no place like a cottage done on the cheap.

    The newest low-cost concept to hit Ontario's cottage scene is the condo-cottage.

    The idea is simple: take a cottage resort, apply some spit and polish and take it condo.

    The price of full ownership can start as low as $99,000, though municipalities often restrict usage to summer and shoulder months.

    Like regular condos, buyers will own their unit outright and also own a proportional share of the land and amenities. Owners pay monthly maintenance fees and property taxes, just like in a condo.

    And it means no lawn mowing, dock installing or other time-squeezing property maintenance issues.

    Fractional ownership burst on the scene about five years ago. With fractionals, buyers get one share, usually representing a one-tenth ownership in a luxury cottage in a prime resort location. Prices can start as low as $29,000 for each share – though in some cases owners may buy as many shares as they wish – and can move up to close to $100,000.

    John Puffer brought the fractional cottage concept to Ontario in 1999 with his first offering, Chandler Point.

    Chandler's six luxury cottages are on Haliburton's rugged Lake Kashagawigamog, which means Long and Windy Waters in the Algonquin language.

    "I was always a cottage fanatic," Puffer says from the deck of his own Kashagawigamog cottage. "I used every excuse in the book to get to the cottage."

    Puffer saw fractionals at Telluride in Colorado and thought the concept would translate well into Ontario's vast and varied cottage country market.

    They have also proven to be a sound investment for early buyers: a five-week share at Chandler's Point sold for $29,000 in 1999 and is bringing in almost double that now, Puffer says.

    Buyers not only get an ownership share in the cottages, which are 1,536-square-feet with three bedrooms and two baths — but they also own a share in the surrounding 2,8 hectares, docks, boats and other amenities.

    "What you see is what you get and unlike timeshares, you have 100 per cent ownership," Puffer says.

    The company has developed three other fractional cottage resorts – William's Landing with 18 cottages and Marcus Beach with 19, both on Kashagawigamog, and Tory's Landing on Sparrow Lake with 18 cottages, for a total of 600 owners.

    The five weeks include one in each season and a fifth week that rotates every year so each owner gets to experience Christmas or March break at the cottage.

    Annual maintenance fees are $2,175 per share and that includes cleaning, telephone, utilities, property taxes, satellite television, property maintenance, driveway plowing, even furniture and appliance replacement.

    The concept is so popular with those who want to spend their time at the cottage having fun instead of working, that some clients have purchased as many as seven shares.

    "People love cottaging, but they don't want to have to do all the work or have all the headaches," Puffer added. "It's a very cost-effective way to cottage."

    Puffer said each of his four cottage resorts sold out long ago, but resales do become available.

    Glenn Scott bought his first fractional share William's Landing in 2003 after selling his cottage in the late 1980s.

    Since then, Scott has sold at William's Landing and bought three shares at Marcus Beach. His mother-in-law has also purchased a share in the same cottage.

    Because Scott bought the first shares in his Marcus Beach vacation home, the family has wrapped up the primo summer months of mid-July to mid-August.

    "If you have any thought of buying intervals back-to-back, you'd better get in on the ground floor," Scott says.

    The concept is perfect for those who like to cottage, but don't want all the work. "It's cottaging light," he adds.

    Scott says that unlike timeshares, which sometimes lose their value, fractional shares move in lockstep with local real estate hikes. In fact, fractionals often increase at a faster pace because of their desirability.

    Jan Holland, owner of Marina Del Rey on the shores of Lake Simcoe near Orillia, says more and more boaters are now using their watercraft as floating cottages.

    "Whether they can't afford a cottage or they just like the flexibility, we are seeing a lot of that now," Holland says.

    His marina operates more as a resort, with a swimming pool, campfire and horseshoe pits, a store, washrooms, showers and laundry facilities and lots of scheduled weekend activities. And each of the covered slips has a picnic table, hydro and water.

    "Our marina is pretty well laid out like a little resort, it's like cottages in a row," adds Holland, who is from Germany and has operated the marina for four years with his British wife Sally.

    The cost of a 30-foot used live-aboard boat can start around $30,000 and the annual fees for a covered slip for a boat that size would run $3,256 or $1,805 for an open slip. This makes boating a very affordable alternative to cottage ownership.

    Holland says marina resorts like his are unique to North American. "I haven't seen them anywhere else in the Caribbean or Europe, where they usually have just finger slips," he adds.

    The advantage of a boat is its portability. Lake Simcoe connects to Georgian Bay and Lake Ontario through the locks on the Trent system, so boaters can roam for miles.

    Trailers are another popular and low cost alternative to cottage ownership.

    Karen Challinor, president of the 450-member Ontario Private Camp Association, says a park trailer – one that is not on wheels and therefore does not move from place to place – is a perfect cottage alternative.

    "The park model trailers are cottages and then some," says Challinor, who with her family operates the 226-site Red Eagle Family Campground and Trailer Sales on Wollaston Lake in the Kawarthas.

    Doublewides can be as large as 900-square-feet, with two to three bedrooms, fireplaces, hardwood floors, skylights and Corian countertops.

    "The sky's the limit," Challinor says. "And these will cost $80,000, max."

    Throw in another $2,200 a year for a prime waterfront site, and all that adds up to a pretty cost-effective vacation home, she says.

    But it can be done for much less. Newer park model trailers start around $25,000 and an inland site, with sewer hookup, hydro and water, can be had for $1,700 for the six-month season.

    Challinor says many trailer parks are set up to cater to particular interests.

    "There are party parks for the partiers, there are religious parks, there are no alcohol parks, there are nudist parks," she adds. "There is something for everyone."

    Private campgrounds typically come equipped with a host of family amenities, including rec halls, a long list of activities, swimming pools and sand beaches.

    Also called interval ownership, timeshares have been around for some time. With a timeshare, you purchase one or two week blocks of time at a resort for a specified number of years.

    The industry has developed a black eye over high-pressure sales tactics and timeshare's sometimes low resale value.

    But the concept has its fans, since a one-week block of time at one resort can often be traded for time at another.

    Prices range from a few thousand dollars for one-bedroom or studio units up to $25,000 or more for larger units in top resorts.

    YourHome.ca


    Personally, I don't think these tactics are for me. When I saw the headline I thought this was going to be about looking beyond "cottage country" into Northern or Eastern Ontario where cottages are still affordable and the land is less densely populated. For me, the big draw of a cottage is having a place that is completely mine, that I can renovate and improve and garden at will, where I own the land completely and can keep it in the family. If one is after the cottage lifestyle without the real estate angle, though, these ideas could help in achieving that.
    If you reveal your secrets to the wind you should not blame the wind for revealing them to the trees.

    - Kahlil Gibran

  2. #2
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    the idea of condo ANYTHING in cottage country makes me want to puke.

    you want to go to a cottage? fucking rent one. it's not that expensive.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Your Pocket
    Posts
    18,087

    Default

    ^ I know - what's the point of having all your maintenance done for you? If I owned a cottage I'd want to do the gardening, repairs, yard work, etc. And you'd surely have ultra-near neighbours in a condo community - also defeating the purpose of "getting away from it all".
    If you reveal your secrets to the wind you should not blame the wind for revealing them to the trees.

    - Kahlil Gibran

  4. #4
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    Exactly.

    If i ever get a cottage, i want it to be on a small lake somewhere with NOBODY ELSE AROUND.
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  5. #5
    SVZ
    SVZ is offline
    Do fish have boogers? SVZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Venus
    Posts
    1,000,003,609

    Default

    that's stupid...

  6. #6
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Central Duh-hio
    Posts
    22,811

    Default

    What is this 'cottaging' thing anyway? Is it some Canadian only thing?
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  7. #7
    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Your Pocket
    Posts
    18,087

    Default

    ^ I wouldn't have thought so, but maybe, simply because there's enough extra land and lakes everywhere that people can easily have vacation homes.

    You either own or rent a cottage (presumably on a lake) at some distance from your regular home... escape for weekends, weeks or months at a time. In Northern Ontario we called them "camps", but down here it's definitely "cottaging". A lot of my friends growing up in the North had a "camp", as they were really affordable. Home away from home, typically much smaller and more rustic, always on a lake. In Central/Southern Ontario, "cottage country" property is a very valuable commodity so it can be a richer crowd, and they all leave the city on weekends to go to their cottage, or retire there when they're older.

    Is this really just a Canadian thing? I never would have thought!
    If you reveal your secrets to the wind you should not blame the wind for revealing them to the trees.

    - Kahlil Gibran

  8. #8
    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Your Pocket
    Posts
    18,087

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    Exactly.

    If i ever get a cottage, i want it to be on a small lake somewhere with NOBODY ELSE AROUND.
    ZOMG, I saw an ad for a private island in the Muskokas with two houses already on it. It was, for what you would get, an extremely good price in my opinion, though still way out of my price range unfortunately. I can't help thinking that I should have campaigned my entire family to go in on it together...
    If you reveal your secrets to the wind you should not blame the wind for revealing them to the trees.

    - Kahlil Gibran

  9. #9
    SVZ
    SVZ is offline
    Do fish have boogers? SVZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Venus
    Posts
    1,000,003,609

    Default

    i have a friend, and their entire family owns a "bay"...so i think it's like half of a lake i guess? i dunno it's amazing though! had so much fun in the summers, and everyone knew everyone!

  10. #10
    Elite Member Sweetie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Den of the roving cunty bitches
    Posts
    24,533

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tati View Post
    ^ I wouldn't have thought so, but maybe, simply because there's enough extra land and lakes everywhere that people can easily have vacation homes.

    You either own or rent a cottage (presumably on a lake) at some distance from your regular home... escape for weekends, weeks or months at a time. In Northern Ontario we called them "camps", but down here it's definitely "cottaging". A lot of my friends growing up in the North had a "camp", as they were really affordable. Home away from home, typically much smaller and more rustic, always on a lake. In Central/Southern Ontario, "cottage country" property is a very valuable commodity so it can be a richer crowd, and they all leave the city on weekends to go to their cottage, or retire there when they're older.

    Is this really just a Canadian thing? I never would have thought!
    In NC we call them summer homes.

  11. #11
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default







    *sigh*
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  12. #12
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    42,280

    Default

    We call them 2nd homes. (cottageing is something entirely different.... Urban Dictionary: cottaging)

    I agree that this "condo cottage" idea (if I understand it correctly) is strange, but I guess that in this day and age people as so used to doing nothing for themselves that they like this???
    Free Charmed.

  13. #13
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Central Duh-hio
    Posts
    22,811

    Default

    I do not think most areas of the US have this thing..especially since it requires a lake? Maybe in parts of places like Minnesota with lots of lakes? And the vast majority of Americans do not own more than one home(if that many), and most do not rent entire homes/cottages/camps for summer months. People tend to do more of the vacation thing, or camping, or whatever, but most do not do this kind of thing as far as I know of, at least for the majority of Americans who are middle or working class.

    This almost sounds like the Russians and their dachas to me, than anything American.
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  14. #14
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,451

    Default

    See, "cottaging" has a COMPLETELY different meaning where I come from.
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  15. #15
    Elite Member twitchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Dancing on your grave!!!!
    Posts
    9,131

    Default

    Elaborate please.

    "The howling backwoods that is IMDB is where film criticism goes to die (and then have its corpse gang-raped, called a racist, and accused of supporting Al-Qaeda)" ----Sean O'Neal, The Onion AV Club

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 38
    Last Post: April 20th, 2008, 11:12 AM
  2. 9/11 approaches, new Bin Laden video surfaces
    By HWBL in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: September 8th, 2006, 12:42 AM
  3. US approaches 1000 execution since '77
    By buttmunch in forum U.S. Politics and Issues
    Replies: 36
    Last Post: November 28th, 2005, 05:48 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •