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Thread: Floating cities each with enough room for 50,000 inhabitants

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    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    Default Floating cities each with enough room for 50,000 inhabitants

    At first glance, they look like a couple of giant inflatable garden chairs that have washed out to sea

    But they are, apparently, the ultimate solution to rapidly rising sea levels.

    This computer-generated image shows two floating cities, each with enough room for 50,000 inhabitants.

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    The 'Lilypad' cities would be powered by renewable energy sources
    Based on the design of a lilypad, they could be used as a permanent refuge for those whose homes have been covered in water. Major cities including London, New York and Tokyo are seen as being at huge risk from oceans which could rise by as much as 3ft by the end of this century.
    This solution, by the award-winning Belgian architect Vincent Callebaut, is designed to be a new place to live for those whose homelands have been wiped out.

    The 'Lilypad City' would float around the world as an independent and fully self-sustainable home. With a lake at its centre to collect and purify rainwater, it would be accessed by three separate marinas and feature artificial mountains to offer the inhabitants a change of scenery from the seascape.

    Power for the central accommodation hub is provided through a series of renewable energy sources including solar panels on the mountain sides, wind turbines and a power station to harness the energy of the waves.

    Mr Callebaut said: 'The design of the city is inspired by the shape of the great Amazonia Victoria Regia lilypad. Some countries spend billions of pounds working on making their beaches and dams bigger and stronger.

    'But the lilypad project is actually a long-term solution to the problem of the water rising.'

    The architect, who has yet to estimate a cost for his design, added: 'It's an amphibious city without any roads or any cars. The whole city is covered by plants housed in suspended gardens.

    'The goal is to create a harmonious coexistence of humans and nature.'

    'Some countries spend billions of pounds working on making their beaches and dams bigger and stronger.

    'But the Lilypad project is actually a long term solution to the problem of the water rising.

    'And it has the other objective of providing housing for refugees from islands that have been submerged.'

    Enlarge
    The Lilypad city would house climate change refugees
    Centred around a lake which collects and then purifies rain water, the Lilypad will drift around the world following the ocean currents and streams.

    It will be accessed by three marinas and will also feature three 'mountains' to offer the inhabitants a change of scenery.
    Power will be provided through a series of renewable energy sources including solar, thermal, wind energy, hydraulic and a tidal power station.

    The city will actually produce much more energy than it consumes and be entirely 'zero-emission' as all the carbon-dioxide and the waste will be recycled.

    Mr Callebaut added: 'It's an amphibious city without any roads or any cars.

    'The whole city is covered by plants housed in suspended gardens. The goal is to create a harmonious coexistence of humans and nature.

    'I think trying to accomodate the millions of people left homeless by environmental changes will prove to be one of the great challenges of the 21st century.'
    Neither the cost of building the city or the cost of living there have been revealed.

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the global sea level is expected to rise between nine and 88 centimetres by 2100, with a 'best estimate' of 50 centimetres.

    This is due to global warming which is causing the ice caps to melt.

    In many places, 50 centimetres would see entire beaches being washed away, together with a significant chunk of the coastline.

    On low-lying Pacific islands such as Tuvalu, Kiribati or the Maldives, the highest point is only two or three metres above current sea levels.

    If the sea level was to rise by 50cm, significant portions of these islands would be washed away by erosion or covered by water.

    Even if they remain above the sea, many island nations will have their supplies of drinking water reduced because sea water will invade their freshwater stocks.

    There are also tens of millions of people living in low-level coastal areas of southern Asia, such as the coastlines of Pakistan, India, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Burma, who would be in danger.

    Pictured: The floating cities that could one day house climate change refugees | Mail Online

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    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
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    ZOMG awesome!
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    SVZ
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    It's a beautiful idea, but will it work?

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    Elite Member MsDark's Avatar
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    So is that bottom part the low income housing portion??
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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Terrorist target. Can you imagine one of these things getting attacked in deep water, and sinking? Or attacked and taken over by nutcases or terrorists?

    Add to that the design issues(new designs are usually fraught with perils), costs, uncertainties(can it really produce enough food..and energy ..and what about working..being self supporting..)

    Nothing is mentioned about employment. How does that come into play, when these are floating all over the world?

    It almost sounds like these will be luxury 'welfare estates of the sea' for refugess..so exactly who is going to pay for poor Bangladeshis or Polynesians to float around the world living in these things.?

    A very nice and utopian idea..but workable? sustainable? I have serious doubts.
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    they look so cool

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    SVZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sojiita View Post
    Terrorist target. Can you imagine one of these things getting attacked in deep water, and sinking? Or attacked and taken over by nutcases or terrorists?
    almost anything is a terrorist target though

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVZ View Post
    almost anything is a terrorist target though
    How about the rest of the post though:

    Add to that the design issues(new designs are usually fraught with perils), costs, uncertainties(can it really produce enough food..and energy ..and what about working..being self supporting..)

    Nothing is mentioned about employment. How does that come into play, when these are floating all over the world?

    It almost sounds like these will be luxury 'welfare estates of the sea' for refugess..so exactly who is going to pay for poor Bangladeshis or Polynesians to float around the world living in these things.?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sojiita View Post
    How about the rest of the post though:

    Add to that the design issues(new designs are usually fraught with perils), costs, uncertainties(can it really produce enough food..and energy ..and what about working..being self supporting..)

    Nothing is mentioned about employment. How does that come into play, when these are floating all over the world?

    It almost sounds like these will be luxury 'welfare estates of the sea' for refugess..so exactly who is going to pay for poor Bangladeshis or Polynesians to float around the world living in these things.?
    which is why i asked "will it work?"

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SVZ View Post
    which is why i asked "will it work?"
    Yeah..I have serious doubts myself.

    But number one question..who is going to pay for all this and support these refugees? How will they earn money and work? Plus if it is just a giant aimless refugee center, it most likely will just turn into a floating crowded ghetto.

    I sense overall disaster with the whole plan. Like Pruitt-Igoe in 1952-a Utopian idea before the nightmare reality had actually come to be.
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    Elite Member Cali's Avatar
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    I have a hard time believing that a strong tsunami couldn't flip that whole thing over.

    There are so many reasons this wouldn't work. But it looks cool as hell. I'm sure someone will build a few of these as 'floating resorts' before too long. That, I would buy into. It could be a brilliant short-term place to stay.

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    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calimoonchild View Post
    I have a hard time believing that a strong tsunami couldn't flip that whole thing over.

    There are so many reasons this wouldn't work. But it looks cool as hell. I'm sure someone will build a few of these as 'floating resorts' before too long. That, I would buy into. It could be a brilliant short-term place to stay.
    They would probably be much more economically viable that way, serving the wealthy instead of poor refugees. Of course that is the way of the world, isn't it?
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    Elite Member CherryDarling's Avatar
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    Wow, that is just too cool for words. Will it work? I'm skeptical, but it's neeeeeeeeeeeat.
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    OMG whao. Incredible design.

    but you have some very valid questions Sojiita. I would be curious to see how this works out..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Honey View Post
    Based on the design of a lilypad, they could be used as a permanent refuge for those whose homes have been covered in water. Major cities including London, New York and Tokyo are seen as being at huge risk from oceans which could rise by as much as 3ft by the end of this century.
    Wow, my geography teacher was way off the mark. I always though London was in the middle of England, not on the coast. Even if the ocean rose 3ft they wouldn't find a way to regulate the height of the Thames before it flooded London?

    And here's a thought - if your home has been covered in water, move inland. Amazing how Holland manages to function considering it's an entire country below sea level yet here they are imagining ways to create floating targets.

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