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Thread: Step Inside the Dreamy L.A. Home of Francesco and Bee Carrozzini

  1. #1
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Default Step Inside the Dreamy L.A. Home of Francesco and Bee Carrozzini

    sexy little house.
    it's weird how they have the same furniture in different rooms, plus it all looks uncomfortable so i'd have to change all the seating.
    love their dedication to architectural integrity and how lovingly it was restored, and the architectural details are insane but i still would have gotten rid of the lino in the kitchen and put in some terrazzo or something else era appropriate but a much nicer material.






    WEB-EXCLUSIVE HOME TOUR


    Step Inside the Dreamy L.A. Home of Francesco and Bee Carrozzini


    The Hollywood Regency abode is steeped in design history
    By Mayer Rus
    Photography by Tim Street-Porter

    November 3, 2021



    Despite its relatively modest scale, the landmark John Elgin Woolf house that is the Los Angeles home of director Francesco Carrozzini and his wife, producer Bee Carrozzini, packs a powerfully alluring punch. Built between 1939 and 1942—not coincidentally at the height of Hollywood’s Golden Age—for actor and television editor Robert Seiter, then extensively remodeled and enlarged by Woolf in the 1960s for Dr. Henry Dodge, Jr., the residence neatly encapsulates the romance and theatricality that define the Hollywood Regency style. Woolf, a debonair Southerner who established himself as a social fixture and tastemaker among Tinseltown’s beau monde, was one of the main progenitors of Hollywood Regency—and arguably its greatest maestro—renowned for his artistry in mixing French Neoclassical, Greek Revival, and modernist design idioms into an intoxicating olio redolent of sun-kissed Southern California living, equally gracious and glamorous. His talents garnered a loyal following among Hollywood’s elite, with a client roster that included Cary Grant, Judy Garland, Errol Flynn, Barbara Stanwyck, Loretta Young, and the Ziegfeld singer and comedian Fanny Brice, one of his earliest champions.


    “As a European coming to America, there is a dream aspect to Hollywood that I always found very compelling. This house captures that fantasy,” says Carrozzini, the Italian-born son of the late fashion sibyl Franca Sozzani. Carrozzini began his career as a photographer and music video director, working with the likes of Lenny Kravitz, Jay-Z, and Beyoncé. His 2016 documentary about his mother, Franca: Chaos and Creation, marked a turn to filmmaking. He is currently directing The Hanging Sun, an adaptation of Norwegian author Jo Nesbø’s bestselling novel Midnight Sun.
    Carrozzini purchased the Seiter/Dodge residence from hotelier Sean MacPherson in 2017, the year before he and Bee were married. Rhapsodizing about Woolf and his circle in The New York Times in 2002, MacPherson wrote, “Woolf homes are grand dames. At first their drama and glamour appear almost frivolous, but on closer inspection one discovers that every detail has been meticulously calculated.” MacPherson further noted that his own Woolf house was “designed as a small palace.”

    By the time Carrozzini arrived on the scene, the grand dame was sorely in need of a facelift, and the only intrigue unfolding at the palace was the punished condition of the parquet floors—what he calls “the pièce de résistance of the house”—and the white plaster walls. Nevertheless, its basic layout, architectural flourishes, and abundant charm remained largely intact. The defining feature of the two-bedroom house is its seductive east façade of curvilinear glass walls that cradle the U-shaped form of the pool, an amenity that was added in 1950 and subsequently reimagined by Woolf in its current form as part of the 1960s renovation. The glazed wings extend outdoors into brick-paved porticos that flank the voluptuous pool.

    After a painstaking restoration of the parquet, Carrozzini turned his attention to the refurbishment of the living room walls and their shapely proscenium-like moldings, which frame library niches, built-in bookcases, and the focal fireplace set dramatically at the vertex of the curved walls. “I spent a month picking the perfect white,” Carrozzini says. “This project was not about making major changes that would affect the integrity of the architecture. It was a true restoration. Every choice had to be the right choice,” the director adds. He also emphasizes the inherent appeal of the cozy ovular bath and modest kitchen—quiet rebukes to the elephantine scale of contemporary luxury construction.

    Carrozzini outfitted the house sparingly, deploying period-sensitive furnishings (notably a suite of Osvaldo Borsani seating) in restrained ensembles that defer to the architectural brio of the building. His myriad connections to the worlds of art, fashion, and photography resonate in a collection chockablock with choice pieces by Mario Schifano, Paolo Canevari, Helmut Newton, Richard Avedon, Robert Capa, Thomas Struth, and Man Ray.
    “There’s a soul to certain places,” Carrozzini says, surveying the dreamy lair, which is now—thanks to his advocacy—officially listed as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument. “Even with nothing in it, this house has so much character. Everything I did was to secure its future.”


    The restored Los Angeles home of director Francesco Carrozzini and producer Bee Carrozzini was designed by Hollywood Regency maestro John Elgin Woolf in 1939 and extensively remodeled, again by Woolf, in the 1960s. Here, a focal fireplace mediates the two sides of the curved living area. Francesco meticulously restored the original parquet floor, plaster walls, and ceiling of white-painted wood planks laid in a chevron pattern.



    Brick-paved porticos extend the glass wings of the structure in a dramatic embrace of the U-shaped pool.



    A Mario Testino photograph of Kate Moss commands a wall of the living area.


    A proscenium-like molding frames a library niche and built-in bookcases. Seating by Osvaldo Borsani.

    Another look at the book-filled living area.


    The kitchen has humble VCT flooring and a vintage late 1950s oven that was completely disassembled and rebuilt.


    Danish Modern chairs pull up to a midcentury table in the mirror-paneled dining area.

    A Thomas Struth photograph has pride of place in a bedroom.


    An Osvaldo Borsani chaise occupies a niche in the bedroom that echoes the curve of the east façade.


    Parquet flooring extends into the primary bath, which contains a sinuous period vanity.


    A pool house was added to the property by Woolf as part of the 1960s expansion and remodeling of the house.




























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    czb
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    i like a lot of it but probably would've gotten rid of the steps into the living room. that looks like a disaster waiting to happen.

    as for the range (maybe a wedgewood?), i used to have a boner for those but so many have issues like gas leaks and uneven heating so i am now not a fan. looks pretty but maybe not so functional.
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^^
    i wondered about that but I know nothing about old stoves.
    I get being a restoration purist and wanting to restore more than renovate but yeah I need modern appliances. I’m guessing they probably don’t cook much.
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    Elite Member palta's Avatar
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    i love the house!
    i like the bedroom, and the outside are looks amazing.
    i don't like what you can see of the dinning room. the kitchen looks very sterile and the ceiling is too low.

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    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
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    One of these things is not like the other...the kitchen. I wish there were more pictures, but from what's shown it just doesn't fit the vibe of the rest of the house. The vintage stove is way cool, and I can understand why they kept the floor, because it matches the stove. But it belongs in a cottage-y setting, not this house.
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  6. #6
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^
    i HATE the kitchen floor lol it's making me angry like hugh jackman and wife's artwork did palta. i don't care that it's original to the house, it's fucking awful. cover it up and build a new floor over it if you want to preserve it but god it needs to go. if it was beautiful terrazzo or even a checkered marble it would make the rest of the kitchen look much better.
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    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
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    lol I don't like it either but I'm thinking right or wrong, they kept it because of the stove. And it might look cute in a vintage cottage but not this house.
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    czb
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    i think the kitchen floor is cool. *sorry* when i was looking at homes many years ago i saw a victorian in which the kitchen was redone in the 50s. they had a black and white tile floor much like this. really loved it.

    but i woulda replaced the range in a heartbeat.

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    Gold Member Lalasnake's Avatar
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    I like mid-century modern, but this house was built in the late 30s/early 40s & they should've jumped at the chance to use furnishings from that era. This looks way too modern to me, like someone just wheeled in some furniture for pictures & it's fighting the floors.

  10. #10
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^
    it got a huge update and extension by the original architect in 1960, which definitely gave it its midcentury Hollywood regency flair.
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