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Thread: Charming Paris Flat

  1. #1
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Default Charming Paris Flat







    MAGAZINE



    Tour a Charming Paris Flat Fit for a Fashionable Couple's Family


    Designer Fabrizio Casiraghi breathes new life into a grand Paris flat
    By Joshua Levine
    Photography by Cerruti Draime

    June 12, 2020




    Joseph Frank chairs gather around a
    custom dining table by Fabrizio Casiraghi. Pendant by
    Isamu Noguchi
    ; sconces by
    Victor Levai
    .
    Cerruti Draime



    Photography by Cerruti Draime

    June 12, 2020




    Joseph Frank chairs gather around a custom dining table by Fabrizio Casiraghi. Pendant by Isamu Noguchi; sconces by Victor Levai. Cerruti Draime








    Madame and Monsieur had it all worked out—or at least they thought they did. The fashionable Parisian couple bought a big apartment with many tiny rooms in the 2nd arrondissement, and promptly knocked down all the walls. They had no children, and much as they tried, it didn’t look like they were meant to have any. You can guess what happened next. Boom! A week after they moved in, Madame got pregnant. Then she got pregnant again. Suddenly they needed rooms and walls—in short, they needed the whole habitat for bourgeois Paris family life. So they started looking for a new home.


    The library features a gale Aulenti Marble cocktail table, a 19th-century French rug, and a pair of David Hicks armchairs covered in a Pierre Frey fabric. Vintage lamps; 20th-century African mask.
    Cerruti Draime

    Casiraghi devised an abstract Ellsworth Kelly-inspired artwork for the ceiling of the entry hall. The 19th-century French armchairs wear a Nobilis fabric. 20th-century painting (left).
    Cerruti Draime
    The place they found, a 4,800-square-foot maze of rooms and hallways, all on one floor, is as classical as the previous was bohemian. The building dates from 1900 but was designed to evoke an even earlier time. Elaborate ornamental moldings summon the ghosts of the ancien régime. Decorating it would require a delicate touch. Somewhere between too stuffy and too funky lay the perfect balance, but where, exactly?


    To help find it, the owners called upon Fabrizio Casiraghi, a young Italian designer who set up his own practice in Paris five years ago and has been causing a stir since then. Casiraghi grew up in modernist Milan and cut his design teeth at the influential Dimore Studio, the AD100 firm that showed the world what you could do with a hodgepodge of found objects and the full range of colors in a pack of crayons. In more ways than one, this apartment did not speak his native tongue.


    A Claude Kintzler mobile hangs in a hall whose shade and valance are made of a Clarence House fabric. 1930s table; Maison Leleu rug; Jean Royère sconce.
    Cerruti Draime“The project was complicated for me at the beginning, but in a good way—I love a challenge,” says Casiraghi. “It’s everything I don’t know. In Milan, this doesn’t exist. And with Dimore, it’s always a case of smooth boxes that you cover with objects and colors. This is the opposite—a box that talks a lot. You’ve got to enter a little bit on tiptoe.”

    Take the apartment’s grand living room, for example. The walls are alive with the busy plasterwork filigree that is among the glories of French decorative art. Casiraghi even amped it up a bit by adding bronze-colored highlights in spots—if you’ve got it, aunt it. But then he countered the rococo dazzle with two blunt, almost brutally abstract sculptured plaster ceiling fixtures by contemporary designer Alexandre Logé and wall lamps by Jean Royère with sinuous, tendril-like arms. The right balance had been struck.





    Antique and vintage furnishings decorate the living room, which is crowned by an Alexandre Logé chandelier. Robert Marc painting.
    Cerruti DraimeCasiraghi likes to fresco his walls and ceilings. He’s commissioned constellations for the ceiling of his own charming at, and had fanciful nymphs painted on the walls of the Proust salon at Drouant, the iconic Paris eatery that he just redid top to bottom. But the more he thought about it, the more he felt that such whimsy wouldn’t quite work here. “In an apartment that is already so decorated on its own, it’s better to go with something more geometric,” says Casiraghi. “So we took forms à la Ellsworth Kelly, which is a reference that always comes in with me.” And there they are, two chunky, unexpected blue shapes hovering above you as you enter, startling but also right.

    Casiraghi certainly has touchstones—his “paw,” as the French put it. Kelly, frescoes, Wiener Werkstätte, rounded corners, and lacquer are a few elements that show up regularly, but you have to look hard to see his paw print. “I don’t have a real signature—if I had a style now, at age 33, what would I do at 50? I prefer adapting myself to the client and listening a lot.”


    In the children's bedroom, the custom headboards and canopies are made of a Pierre Frey fabric. A 1950s table lamp sits atop a 19th-century English side table.
    Cerruti Draime

    In the master bath, 19th-century prints hang above The Water Monopoly tub. The striped curtains are made of an outdoor fabric by Dedar.
    Cerruti Draime
    Casiraghi's projects all start with a mood board of evocative images sent in by the client, and this one did too. But the mood board is never meant as a blueprint. It’s more of a signpost toward an unknown destination. “What I like about Fabrizio is that he didn’t come back with the same images as ours,” says Madame. In the kitchen, for instance, Casiraghi proposed a brick-colored terrazzo tile floor. Terrazzo has been basic Milanese vernacular for a long time—Casiraghi’s grandmother’s house had terrazzo floors. She loved the idea, but in Paris, terrazzo is a novelty that is currently having its moment. It’s a little m’as tu vu—“Hey, look at me.”
    “I don’t trust things that are too à la mode,” says the homeowner, who happens to work in the fashion business. “It’s a little like seeing a movie with an actor who’s too well known. You’ve got this incredible story, and then you find yourself saying, ‘Wait, isn’t that . . . ?’ ” In the end, the owners suggested using old tomettes, the glazed terra-cotta tiles that you see all over France. “It’s the French version of the terrazzo, but we never would have ended up there without Fabrizio’s original proposal.”


    Nobilis fabric-covered sofas flank a custom mirrored cocktail table in the living room. Art (from left) by Georges Rouault and Auguste Herbin; 1970s chrome table lamps atop custom plexiglas side tables.
    Cerruti DraimeOf course, there was some pushing and pulling along the way. When is there not? Particularly when forceful personalities with strong preferences are collaborating, as they were here. “At the beginning, I think it was not so easy for Fabrizio,” says Madame. “There’s what I like, and there’s what Monsieur mon mari likes, and our taste isn’t always the same. Sometimes it’s like we’re in two different countries.”

    Solomonic compromises were occasionally required. Monsieur doesn’t really like tassels, for instance. Madame loves them (as does Casiraghi). So the orange tassel on the big Noguchi ceiling lantern in the dining room gets hung when her friends come to dinner, and removed when they leave. Mostly, though, everybody’s tastes ultimately converged, to the point where it became difficult to tell whose paw was whose. “A friend of ours came over and said, ‘You can see it’s Fabrizio, but at the same time, it’s totally you.’ ” Which is exactly the compliment Madame was hoping for.





    Casiraghi in the library.


    The custom kitchen features lacquered cabinetry, a custom table, and vintage chairs.


    A custom bed and curtains decorate the master bedroom. Pierre Frey fabric-covered armchairs by Paolo Buffa; 18th-century artworks; Green River Project screen.


    A 20th-century African mask hangs on library cabinetry. 1970s travertine table lamp.


    A 20th-century painting hangs above a 19th-century English bench in the custom dressing room.


    The living room walls feature plasterwork filigree accented with bronze highlights. A Nobilis fabric covers the sofa; custom cocktail table; Victor Vasarely artwork.








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    Elite Member mtlebay's Avatar
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    Cluttered.
    and very IKEA-like.
    And why do these homes insist on those stupid piles of magazines?!
    Go Habs Go!!

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    "charming" doesn't even begin to do this place justice. the apartment itself is glorious and i love that they kept it all white and airy with lots of wood floors and organic elements. there are loads of antiques and vintage pieces but it still feels totally modern and graphic and a little bohemian.
    needmeds, effie2 and Waterslide like this.
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    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    I love the apartment itself but I'm not sold on all that dark orange furniture and trims, and the kids' bedroom looks like a face-painting booth at a Renaissance Fair. And I hate the dinky little IKEA kitchen.
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    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    Is it wrong that I like the aqua blue handles in the kitchen? I mean, I really do.

    I hear myself saying I hate all white houses but I guess I don't because I seem never to hate them if they're in Paris or New York. I just hate boxy, boring, glaring, surgical white. This is beautiful. And also not ALL white which helps. It would be a great place for me because it has all that fussy, prissy gilded shit and then it's up to date and fun and modern everywhere else with the chrome and plexiglass which I would hate in a McMansion but is in its correct setting here. I really especially love that room with the green furniture and drape thingy.

    And tbh, I'd love it if my own room looked like a face painting booth at a Ren Faire. I'm hopeless.

    tl;dr Places like this appeal to me because I love old things, but they are often not practical, and I also am too indecisive to pick an era, and you can get away with displaying just about anything in this setting.
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^^
    i adore the pulls on the kitchen cabinets. and that's not ikea, those are custom lacquer cabinets. it's such a cool mix with the almost rustic tiles. i love the mix of old and new that feels really modern without being trendy.
    you know i love an all white home but i like it balanced with the warmth of architectural details and organic elements like wood floors and antique tile floors and all the cabinetry and the moulding. also i want to take that vasarely off their hands.
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    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
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    Yes, I see a few pieces of art in there that I had to take a second look at to realize they're originals because my poor brain only thinks in prints and reproductions. lol I am very jealous.

    But yeah, that is all a good way to put it. I need the white to have some character. I love wood and moulding and old floors and splashes of color against white or black (I even like those still life flower paintings in the one bedroom). The flooring in this place is gorgeous and chipping and looks old so of course that's a major plus for me. It's also very bohemian in the original artsy sense of the word...not boho, but genuinely eclectic.

    I don't know this Fabrizio Casiraghi person. Is he any relation to those Casiraghis?
    sputnik likes this.
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    Gold Member needmeds's Avatar
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    The library rug is a dream come true. And that closet is amazing. Beautiful place!
    effie2 likes this.

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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    It's lovely. It also says to me, "come in, look around, DO NOT SIT ON ANY OF THIS! and leave. Soon."
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    Elite Member effie2's Avatar
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    I am in love and that burned orange couch stole my heart.It is in Paris and my favorite second arr..And if there are a few things i might not like,sorry i cant bother..i love it.
    sputnik likes this.

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    Elite Member funky_chicken's Avatar
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    Orange really isn't my colour. Also, I would burn that rug.
    -

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    Elite Member ConstanceSpry's Avatar
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    I love it, wouldn't change a thing. Oh, to be rich and own residences (and original art all over the world.
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    Elite Member Tiny Pixie's Avatar
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    I think I hate it all. Apart from the space itself and the gorgeous light.
    And nothing screams "children's room" like an ugly ass pretentious art framed poster.
    Icepik and pinkbunnyslippers like this.
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    Elite Member Icepik's Avatar
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    The more I scrolled down, the more I hated it.

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Can anybody explain what is going on with the nude statue in the 6th photo? Is he doing warmup stretches? Or did he get his arm stuck in the trunk, like James Franco in "127 Hours"?

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