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Thread: Typical architectural styles around the world

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    A*O
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    Default Typical architectural styles around the world

    Watching a UK TV detective show the other day it struck me that you could instantly tell where it was set from the style of the ordinary houses alone. Example, the great British 3-bed semi-detached which Ive only ever seen there. The style varies slightly depending on when they were built but the basic floor plans are the same. My granny lived in one like this, built just before WW2.



    From the 1960s. Note the garage as people had cars by then.



    This would be a typical floor plan (excluding conservatory). Older homes have a dividing wall between the living and dining room which people often knock through as separate dining rooms become less useful with modern lifestyles. We have one and use it twice a year tops. We live/eat/cook in one big room these days.



    Meanwhile in Australia, here's a typical "California" bungalow, common in most city suburbs. Most were built between the wars and have some great Art Deco interior features.




    Do you think there's a "typical" style of home in your part of the world? (Trailerparks included)
    Last edited by A*O; October 13th, 2013 at 07:52 PM.
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    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Around my area they're all either Victorian terraces or 1890s working cottages (or ugly apartments):

    "You're going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well."



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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    park slope, brooklyn. lots of brownstones and old apartment houses. these are pretty typical:







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    ^I love those! One of my favourite memories of NYC is sitting out on the stoop watching the world go by.
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    @ faithanne. Melbourne has a lot of those Victorian terrace cottages too, often with the intricate cast iron "lacework" on the verandas and balconies.



    @ sput. Yes, those are very recognisable NYC but probably other big US cities too like Chicago or San Francisco?
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    ^^^
    i'm not too familiar with chicago but while there are some similar houses in san francisco, most have a different style. more victorian.
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    Elite Member palta's Avatar
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    sputnik, I love those!

    In Buenos Aires, Argentina we have:

    - Casa chorizo (Residential homes with several apartments, for middle class families)






    - Revival buildings (now mostly office buildings and hotels)






    - Revival buildings (residential, upper class)






    - Upper class homes (several styles)
















    - Cheap and ugly contemporary buildings



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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    Palta, except for the cheap contemporary buildings, your pictures reminded me of how much I love buenos aires! I miss living in south America in large part because I can't go to buenos aires for long weekends anymore.
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    There are myriad styles throughout Canada, particular in bigger cities, but I grew up in something like this and so did most of my friends:

    Older:

    Newer:


    Many of the homes in my neighbourhood were of similar construction, although all very different finishes and colours (it wasn't a built subdivision but a higher end residential neighbourhood that evolved over time). I guess these homes started coming about in the 70s, maybe? They're called side-splits. Bungalows are common in such neighbourhoods too, but a bungalow to us meant something like this:



    Finished basements, always, which usually housed a family room.

    They're often pretty nice inside and they remind me of home, but it's a style I can't bring myself to purchase now because it just screams 70s/80s and seems very limiting. I'm definitely drawn to more Old World exteriors and fašades.

    Then you have all sorts of developer McMansions, Victorian townhomes in bigger cities, actual mansions or grand homes with nice architectural features, small bungalows of the "other" type, some trailer parks (they're called Mini Home parks out east), farmhouses old or restored, etc. Really ultramodern stuff tends to be done as one-off builds or renos by individuals - you don't usually see big swaths of ultramodern style unless it's the interior of a condo building. Many ugly apartment buildings from the 70s-90s.

    I currently live in an old elementary school which is a big red brick cube, but that's not the norm.
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    I really like some of those buildings, Palta. I'd love to visit some of the South American countries.

    It is funny how you can quite often tell which country or part of the world it is by looking at the house style.

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    This thread is one of my most favorites.It gives me the same feeling i get when i visit a place for the first time and surface from a metro(tube subway)station to see for the first time a new part of the city..same longing and joy.Thank you all for the pictures..lovely.
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    The Federation style is everywhere in Sydney:







    Sydney is built on sandstone and so are most of our public buildings from colonial times (Melbourne is full of bluestone):







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    A typical "Queenslander" house found mostly in, yes you guessed, Queensland! This is an older one but the basic style is still being built as it suits the tropical climate. Common features are wide verandas (often closed off at night for sleeping), tin roof, elevated on pillars to catch any breezes, louvre windows.

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    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
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    Love a Queenslander!
    "You're going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well."



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    ^^ I was actually just going to post a Queenslander. Not a true Queenslander unless the floorboards creak and groan.
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