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Thread: A Cottage in Stone and Glass

  1. #1
    Elite Member Honey's Avatar
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    Default A Cottage in Stone and Glass


    Ed Alcock for The New York Times
    A view of the beach. Julia and Rick Martin live on Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands off the coast of Normandy, France.

    Ed Alcock for The New York Times
    Mr. Martin, 38, together with his wife, bought a renovated 15th-century stone barn with a glass-walled extension for 895,000 pounds, or around $1.4 million.













    A Cottage in Stone and Glass - Slide Show - NYTimes.com

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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    love. i'd change some of the furniture and artwork but the house itself is to die for. gorgeous.
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    Elite Member Mel1973's Avatar
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    Like the stone part. don't care for too much of the glass. the dining area looks straight out of a church (complete with pew). I lovelovelove the bathroom... the bathing area anyway!
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    Elite Member Kathie_Moffett's Avatar
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    WOW I love that bathroom--can you imagine being in there in a rainstorm?! Soooo cool.
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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    I don't see the point of this, and features from the cottage have been lost into a generic interior.

    I quite like the juxtaposition of cobble stone build & glass but that 2-strand theme is lost inside. They've even replaces the old beams.....
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^
    i'm guessing they bought it with some renovations already done and that might have been when a lot of that was lost. or the barn was in such bad condition that there was no choice but to replace all those things, which often happens. plus it was a barn and those are never built to be inhabited so it requires a lot more work to convert them into actual houses.

    i know an australian couple who bought what were essentially ruins of a 16th century farm in burgundy. they preserved what they could and made the rest modern, not trying to recreate what was gone but going with the total juxtaposition of very old with very modern. there's even one part of the dining room where a part of the stone wall was missing. instead of replacing it, they made that part glass.

    another place where this approach to restoration was done is the castello di rivoli near turin. it's a giant palace with bits dating back to the 14th century and parts added on during the renaissance and later. and then it was badly damaged during the war. when they restored it, they didn't try to fill the gaps where the parts where missing but made very modern pieces instead - glass and steel where parts of the walls were missing, etc. there's a colonnade in the courtyard, some of the columns were missing. rather than recreating replicas, they replaced the missing columns with black steel ones that are obviously from a different era. it works. likewise, inside, where parts of the frescos on the wall are missing, they didn't fill in the gaps with copies of the drawings to complete the design but just put in white plaster so that you can tell where the original design is and what's missing.

    sorry for the long explanation but i find this stuff fascinating. my mother restores paintings and she's explained how the old school of restoration would 'copy' missing bits of painting to fill in the gaps, but the newer approach is to put in some kind of material to fill the gap but not recreate the drawing, so that you can tell where the piece is missing but you still put something there to repair the damage.
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    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
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    Totally get what you're saying - and appreciate that when renovating an old property one is likely to completely replace the old plaster for various reasons (due to manufacture, damp & age it tends to crumble upon touch). However due to the above reasons if you buy an old property in the UK its likely (depending on its age) that you're going to totally gut it at least on the ground floor. Because of this barn conversions are actually easier because you don't have to remove a lot of debris prior to the gutting. Barns in the UK are generally mainly waterproof.
    There are (tax) benefits to totally dropping a building & then rebuilding however many (non-professionals) don't know that. I used to consult for a property developer & the properties that he kept the "unique" bits on always looked "better" to me.... interestingly enough they used to sell better too.

    I TOTALLY LOVE this with the cobble walls, glass fill & other bits....


    ditto

    But the roof ...... I hate it.
    I like the roof lights, and I like the space but I find the monotony of the symmetrical repeats medeocre & the ironwork can be found in any mid-range, multi-conversion anywhere in the UK, Guess I'd just have prefered some reclaimed handcarved beams in there to break-up all those lines (and I dislike what the ceilings shown have been lined with.... )


    I went back to the orginal article and it was interesting....
    ISLE OF GUERNSEY — As a child, Julia Martin loved visiting the aviary next door to an old barn dating back to the 15th century. At the time she never paid much attention to the neglected building, and certainly never imagined calling it home. But about 25 years later home it became, and not before it was renovated by a local architect.
    Multimedia

    Slide Show
    A Cottage in Stone and Glass







    Together with her husband, Rick Martin, the couple chose the barn, here on the rocky coast of Guernsey, one of the Channel Islands off of the coast of Normandy, France, as their first family home.
    Ms. Martin, 33, who runs her own recruiting business and Mr. Martin, 38, the creative director for a marketing and design company, grew up on opposite sides of the island, but only met 10 years ago through mutual friends. They had spent over 18 months looking for a house. But in 2008, they knew the old barn was perfect the moment they walked in.
    “We took about three steps inside and said, ‘Yes, we’ll have it,’ ” Mr. Martin said. Within a few months, they had bought the 3,500-square-foot house for 895,000 pounds, or $1.4 million at $1.53 to the pound, and moved in.
    The barn was refurbished by Jamie Falla, an architect in Guernsey, who transformed the granite, dark structure by adding a glass extension to the back, giving almost every room access to the garden. Adding to the lightness of the renovation are resin and recycled glass floors.
    In the spirit of recycling, the couple plan to make the house increasingly eco-sustainable. Photovoltaic solar panels will be installed later this year; new insulation was installed to help make the building more energy efficient.
    “The recession has meant we’ve had to coordinate a revolving set of works, rather than doing everything at once,” Mr. Martin said.
    For furniture, they kept a dining table that the architect had left behind, made of wooden panels. They decorated the open-plan kitchen with plants, a painting from a vacation to South Africa and a framed modern piece they bought from the Tate gallery shop. The shiny Poggenpohl refrigerator, a German kitchen company, is spacious enough for Mr. Martin to cure strips of bacon safely out of the reach of their pet cat, Yoda.
    The guest bedroom, which also doubles as an office for Ms. Martin, features an wooden-framed bed designed by Mr. Martin. Here a glass wall opens into the front garden.
    The glass theme continues through a transparent passage (with glass walls, floors and ceilings) connecting the extension to the original building.
    In the new extension are the bedrooms. The master bedroom is simply decorated, but the glass wall gives it a feeling of suspension as it overlooks the garden. A high fence and leafy expanse shelter the grounds. In the garden is a vegetable patch and trees bearing apples, cherries and figs.
    The living room is lit with industrial-style spot lights. White leather sofas face the newly restored fireplace and a flat-screen television, while a library along the far wall offers a quieter form of entertainment.
    “One thing we have discovered about the house,” Ms. Martin said, “is that everyone who visits has something to say about it, whether good or bad. We love it.”

    So its an award-winning architect vanity build.... but some of it is still very nice....


    From this angle the metalwork looks loads better but I'm still not convinced about it. Don't like the kitchen island. not at all. Love the glass gallery.
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    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    i don't like the kitchen island either but i love the roof, i think it's gorgeous. and those exterior shots you posted of the house make me love it even more.
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    I love the outside but the promise is not delivered on the inside....
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    I like the majority of it myself, but there'd be a few changes I would make, especially furniture wise. But gosh, its very different!

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    Too much glass. I wouldn't be able to feel comfortable because I'd be too paranoid about people watching me. Man I have issues.
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