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Thread: Steve Irwin dead...

  1. #376
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    I agree that this happens quite a lot unofficially. My friend died about 15 years ago and he wasn't that lucky. It was terribly sad for everybody, but especially for him. He was truly in excruciating pain, begging for relief. I think what happened to him was a form of torture.

  2. #377
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    When I was in grade 5 my grandpa died from stomach cancer. I remember that he was given some morphine but I don't think he liked it cuz I think he wanted to communicate with his family with clearer mind...but I don't know how much pain he would have been in had he no been medicated... He was already at an advanced stage so he didn't go through any surgery, chemo or radiation. He was about 72.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

  3. #378
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    All this talk of "viewing death" has gotten me thinking. Most of you have seen someone die, someone close to you, and as A*O said, relive it in your head often enough. But I'm sort of the opposite. My father died a little over 9 months ago, long illness (Alzheimer's) and no real shock when he did go, except that dying age 64 from Alzheimer's is pretty unheard of. I hadn't seen him for 10 years, almost to the day, when he died. I knew he was ill, hadn't been to see him. But when he died, I was notified 9 days afterwards, and wasn't told about the funeral. I never really saw anything associated with death when it came to him. So even though I know he's dead, and I have his estate sorted etc etc, because I wasn't involved in any of that process, it doesn't seem a reality to me that he's dead.

    Strange rambling I know, but it makes me wonder whether it's that touch of reality that some people are seeking. yeah a lot of poeple are just a little gruesome, and the video would probably end up on rotten.com, but for those people involved, whether having some sort of documentation of the person's death, by that final video, even just owning it without ever watching it, brings a sense of reality to matters.

    Personally I don't think a family member would ever want to watch a video like that, but at the same time if it were me, I don't think I could just throw that video away. I wonder whether you guys knowing how your parent/partner/friend died is better or worse than my imaginations of what may or may not have happened.
    "I have never made but one prayer to God, a very short one: 'O Lord, make my enemies ridiculous.' And God granted it."

  4. #379
    Hit By Ban Bus! UndercoverGator's Avatar
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    Much better for me to know exactly how my father died than to imagine it. It was actually quite peaceful and beautiful but then again, he was brain dead, all they had to do was turn off the resperator.

  5. #380
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    This may be terribly unrelated but when my step-dad died we were very much involved with hospice. They were wonderful and very understanding. They told us that so much about death and the view of it has to do with the way the families view it spiritually speaking. If the person was a person of faith to begin with, often times, their deaths are more peaceful. I don't know if that's true but they told us that has been their experience. The whole cancer ordeal was draining...the chemo, the fear, the feeling of hopelessness in not being able to help the one you love...but when the end eventually came, it WAS beautiful. They told us at hospice that we shouldn't fear death and it would not be gruesome. Just as there is process in being born, they told us there is also a process of dying. The body prepares for it. My step-dad had a lot of counseling and so did the family as a group. They also told us that they'd keep him comfortable (which they did) and ANYTHING we needed, they'd provide. It may have helped that yes, we were mentally and spiritually prepared for it, but it still hurt nonetheless. My dad didn't die in pain and it was peaceful. For that I was very grateful. My own dad, when he died, it was fast too. He died at the hospital in two days and rather suddenly. No death that I ever witnessed was horrific or excruciating. Not that it doesn't ever happen that way, but the people I saw die I think were ready for it. My father never ever had a fear of death. He always spoke of it so matter of factly. He'd always say there is no death, just a 'transformation'. So I guess that's how I always viewed it--not an end, just a change.

    On the other hand, my co-worker told me that when her sister died of ovarian cancer it was horrible. She said they didn't give her any morphine and she was very unaccepting of the end coming to begin with. She never came to terms with her own mortality and this sister was very angry, she didn't want to die (understandably). She said her sister was in excruciating pain and her family took it all very hard. It literally took her sister days to die. She said that eventually a priest came to them one day and told them "Let her go. Sometimes when you refuse to let the person go, you prolong their suffering". My co-worker said after 3 or 4 days of seeing her sister in agony, she and her family just prayed to God to take her. Her sister died the following day. It broke my heart of how the end (for them) was so painful. I'm so glad my family didn't have to go through that. I mean we suffered, believe me, it was hard, we shed lots of tears, but when death did come, it wasn't horrible and he wasn't in pain. It wasn't like some scene from the Exorcist. Thank God.

    Anyway, in regards to Steve Irwin, I don't think he suffered much. From what I've read, it happened rather suddenly and he died within minutes (if not seconds) of being stabbed in the chest by that stingray barb. At least that was merciful in itself--it happened quickly.
    Last edited by PrettyGirl; September 7th, 2006 at 11:16 AM.

  6. #381
    Elite Member burnt_toast's Avatar
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    I wasn't with my dad when he died, nor was I much a part of his life before his death. The Irwin family is very different, but I know that if I had a video of his death I would feel compelled to watch it. I can't really explain why, but there's a part of me that wants to know what it was like - whether or not he suffered, and to see it with my own two eyes.

    This whole thread is too hard for me.

    Sojiita, my heart breaks for you and all you went through watching the man you love suffer so.

  7. #382
    Hit By Ban Bus! WickedHo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacific breeze View Post
    One reason many cancer deaths are so awful, particularly for the patient, are the ridiculous drug laws that prohibit doctors from prescribing the strongest painkillers known to mankind such as morphine (heroin) and Dilaudid. It's ever so much better to have someone die in unnecessary agonizing pain than to make them drug dependent on their deathbeds!
    Wait. What? What's the reason for not administering morphine to a dying cancer sufferer?? What the fuck??? Are you actually telling me that doctors ARE SUPPOSED to let patients die in complete physical agony???

    Ok. You know what? I think I may have just found my next crusade. Remember Shirley Maclaine's (sp?) famous line "GIVE MY DAUGHTER HER SHOT!!!!" Yeah. That would be me.

    I still can't believe it. They should be ashamed of themselves. I am so fucking pissed off right now.

  8. #383
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    This is a 2005 U.S. Supreme Court case discussing the matter.

    http://www.usccb.org/ogc/ashcroft2.pdf

    Oops, sorry -- it is just an amicus curiae brief. But it has some good discussion of the law.
    Last edited by ScooBeth; September 16th, 2006 at 06:33 PM.

  9. #384
    Hit By Ban Bus! WickedHo's Avatar
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    Thanks, ScooBeth, but I can't read it right now. I'm headed home in 5 minutes!!

    But, yeah, I'll read it on Monday. I'm damn curious.

  10. #385
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
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    Was on vacation during this lovely debate. Just read most of it. Wow. That's all I'm gonna say.

  11. #386
    Elite Member Palermo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WickedHo View Post
    Am I the only one that thinks she looks, um... "special." It's ok to laugh, folks, because she so obviously isn't. She's just got her dad's beady eyes is all.



    Ugh. I'm still sad about it. GODDAMN PLANET EARTH!! We get robbed here all the time!!


    I don't know if it "should" or "shouldn't" be aired, but I'm curious. It's such an unusual, fantastical way to die, I'd like to know what happened step by step. What was he doing? How quick did it happen? Who responded? How soon did they come to his aid? What did they do?

    I'm a nerd, and I'm curious about the world. Plus, I have a morbid fascination. To this day, I lament the fact I'm not a neurosurgeon.


    Although intrigued, I've never been into snuff films. I could never muster the strength to rent Faces of Death.

    See, this is exactly why I'm curious.
    Not at all, I too thought perhaps she had Down's syndrome. Until I saw the picture with her standing in front of her dad and they both had a larger left eye and a squintier right one.

  12. #387
    Silver Member irishpig's Avatar
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    My dad died of cancer when I was in high school. It started in his lungs and spread to his spine and brain. He was in considerable pain. His doctor told my mom, a very shy and proper woman, that they couldn't give him morphine, because it was addictive. My mom literally lunged across the desk at the doctor....my dad had only a month or two to live, and my mom couldn't let him be in agony like that.
    My mom won that battle, LOL...but I do know that many doctors are afraid to prescribe serious drugs to chronic/terminal patients because they can end up losing their licenses. Crazy.

  13. #388
    A*O
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishpig View Post
    ...but I do know that many doctors are afraid to prescribe serious drugs to chronic/terminal patients because they can end up losing their licenses. Crazy.
    And that's the truth of the matter. It only takes one family member to accuse the docs of 'euthanising' a patient - and let's face it, in the final stages of cancer that's exactly what happens but they call it 'paliative pain relief' - and all hell breaks loose. When my MIL was dying of agonising breast/bone cancer she gathered the family around + the doctors caring for her and told us quite firmly that she wanted 'as much pain medication as necessary'. We all knew what she meant and she insisted me all agree there and then and in front of each other as witnesses that her wishes would be fulfilled. And they were.

    In both my MIL and my father's case they more or less told the family and docs how they wanted to die and we respected those wishes. And I have to say it made dealing with their deaths so much easier to bear because we knew they got the dignified, peaceful, painfree death they both wanted.
    If all the women in this place were laid end to end, I wouldn’t be surprised - Dorothy Parker

  14. #389
    Bronze Member SugarLangdon's Avatar
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    i feel like i know him for some reason...b/c i watched his show a lot and i really feel bad for him and his family

    Quote Originally Posted by Sleuth View Post
    Just did a drive by of the zoo, it closed an hour ago and there are heaps of people outside the entrance laying flowers around the wooden crocodile statue out the front of the zoo. All the news crews are there doing their stories and filming. Many of the staff are still there consoling each other.
    his friend Wes was there when he died and tried to revive him but it was too late...so sad

    Quote Originally Posted by Grimmlok View Post
    *snorts*

    It's Darwinism at its finest.

    If you want environmentalists, go talk to David Suzuki. He's probably done more environmental work than any person alive and didn't have to stick his thumb up an animal's butthole to do it.
    i agree it was his fault but i mean the guy did not plan to die..he was doing his job and ironically it killed him but have some compassion man...

  15. #390
    Elite Member Voodoo Child's Avatar
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    'Crocodile Hunter' Steve Irwin's eight-year-old daughter last night (14.09.06) vowed to copy her father and swim with stingrays.

    Brave Bindi even said she will film the same giant fish who killed her father when she presents her own wildlife TV show 'Jungle Girl', scheduled to air in January.

    Steve, 44, died tragically last week when a stingray's poisoned barb pierced his heart while he was filming a documentary at Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

    It was thought Bindi's show would be axed following his death but she wants to carry on her father's conservation and TV work.

    Steve's manager John Stainton revealed the naturalist only decided to film the stingray that killed him on the spur of the moment, so his daughter could see it.

    He had been shooting scenes for his own new show 'Ocean's Deadliest' but suddenly decided to look for stingrays, which are known as the 'pussycats of the sea'.

    John said: "It should have been an innocent encounter for a TV show aimed at children. Bindi's new series is going to premiere next January throughout the world.

    "Steve was an integral part of that programme. We will do him proud and continue that effort."

    Meanwhile, Steve's mother-in-law, Julie Raines, has revealed that Bindi, her two-year-old brother Robert, referred to by the wildlife expert as Bob, and his widow Terri have been left devastated by his untimely death.

    Julie said: "Robert says, 'Where's daddy?' But Bindi's been a rock. It's just a very hard time."

    I am not sure what to say about this....

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