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Thread: Would mandatory cooking classes help childhood obesity?

  1. #16
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    I think that there should be a lot of classes in general that teach kids how to function on their own. Kids should learn how to cook, about nutrition, how to grocery shop, clean, create a budget, balance a check book, etc. It's weird, but so many people that I know have no clue of how to do anything as far as managing their home, health and life.

    Hell, back in the day, I would go to the store and load up on ramen noodles, bread, peanut butter, tuna, pasta and spaghetti sauce, potatoes, etc. I agree with you A*O, it's still better than McDonalds.

  2. #17
    Elite Member Ravenna's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    I think that there should be a lot of classes in general that teach kids how to function on their own. Kids should learn how to cook, about nutrition, how to grocery shop, clean, create a budget, balance a check book, etc. It's weird, but so many people that I know have no clue of how to do anything as far as managing their home, health and life.
    ITA. I always thought they should at least teach money management in high school because of all the problems people have with debts and so on.

  3. #18
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ravenna View Post
    ITA. I always thought they should at least teach money management in high school because of all the problems people have with debts and so on.
    So true. It's great that kids can learn about science, history, literature and math, but they need to learn the basics to keep out of debt and to understand how credit works and how loans work.

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    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
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    I think that there should be a lot of classes in general that teach kids how to function on their own. Kids should learn how to cook, about nutrition, how to grocery shop, clean, create a budget, balance a check book, etc.
    Yes! OMG, soooo yes! It's really unfortunate that these "life skills" classes only seem to be offered (in Ontario anyway) to "at-risk" kids or almost-dropouts, or dropouts who've returned to alternative education. At my school it was technically available, but it was considered some sort of special ed which of course regular students felt ashamed - or not even allowed - to take. It was never presented as an option on the standard curriculum.
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  5. #20
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    It's the same here Tati. There was a math class that was offered at my high school that went over some of these things, but most of the kids that took the class weren't going on to college. People need life skills and a lot of parents don't teach it or can't teach it because they don't have a firm grasp on financial things themselves.

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    i think they would help, learning a few healthy dishes to start

  7. #22
    Gold Member birdmadgirl's Avatar
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    If kids came away from such classes with positive attitudes toward cooking and nutrition, that'd be great. But honestly, I think people are lazy and stupid on purpose. It's just so much easier to swing by the McD's drive thru and grab a $1 double cheeseburger than it is to go to the grocery store and shop for good foods. And, so many people I know fork down crap knowing full well how bad it is for them. Some even think it's amusing, which is just bizarre and stupid.

  8. #23
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    I think that there should be a lot of classes in general that teach kids how to function on their own. Kids should learn how to cook, about nutrition, how to grocery shop, clean, create a budget, balance a check book, etc. It's weird, but so many people that I know have no clue of how to do anything as far as managing their home, health and life.

    Hell, back in the day, I would go to the store and load up on ramen noodles, bread, peanut butter, tuna, pasta and spaghetti sauce, potatoes, etc. I agree with you A*O, it's still better than McDonalds.
    this is me now! And yeah..it is better and cheaper than fast food(which I have given up, along with stuff like pop/soda). Fortunately I love all of those things and have an imagination and am willing to experiment. (potatoes are so damn versatile!! and loaded with vitamins and minerals). also sweet potatoes are not THAT expensive..and are about the best things you can possibly eat from a nutrition standpoint(sans the masses of butter on them of course).
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  9. #24
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    This is just one small area that needs to be taught in schools! When I started doing Weight Watchers I was amazed and then embarrassed at how much I had been and how poorly even though I thought I was eating well. Once you are in the habit of paying attention to your portion sizes and intake, you realize just how bad all those ready made products can be. I try to fix with fresh ingredients as often as I can but have found that those things can be expensive and if you're on a tight budget or don't have access to the produce, it's a serious struggle.

    The same can be said for the "consumer math" class that was offered in high school. It was for the kids who weren't doing college and weren't ready for the Algebra classes. My sister can do algebra with no problem but won't balance her check book.

    Why high school doesn't offer practical classes is beyond me. Honestly, my fabulous retention of Mythology and those other helpful subjects really hasn't helped me much in the real world.
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  10. #25
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    ^^Consumer Math!! That's what it was. I grew up in Maryland. Great class. Should be a mandatory math requirement.

  11. #26
    Elite Member Dixie Normos's Avatar
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    Um, Soj, I hate to burst your bubble, but potatoes have little nutritional value. Mainly they are just starch...which is a simple sugar.

    Here's the general rule of thumb when it comes to bad food: If you love it, it's probably bad for you.
    Health food: If you hate it, it's probably good for you - this theory also covers medication: cough syrup, tastes like a melted poopsickle...and is good for you.
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  12. #27
    Elite Member Sojiita's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dixie Normos View Post
    Um, Soj, I hate to burst your bubble, but potatoes have little nutritional value. Mainly they are just starch...which is a simple sugar.

    Here's the general rule of thumb when it comes to bad food: If you love it, it's probably bad for you.
    Health food: If you hate it, it's probably good for you - this theory also covers medication: cough syrup, tastes like a melted poopsickle...and is good for you.
    sorry to burst your bubble. As long as they are not drenched in oil or butter, they are good for you. And when it comes to calories..it is very simple-calories in vs calories out.

    Potatoes contain a number of important vitamins and minerals. A medium potato (150g/5.3 oz) with the skin provides 27 mg vitamin C (45% of the Daily Value (DV)), 620 mg of potassium (18% of DV), 0.2 mg vitamin B6 (10% of DV) and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, niacin, magnesium, phosphorus, iron, and zinc. Moreover, the fiber content of a potato with skin (2 grams) equals that of many whole grain breads, pastas, and cereals. In addition to vitamins, minerals and fiber, potatoes also contain an assortment of phytochemicals, such as carotenoids and polyphenols. The notion that “all of the potato’s nutrients” are found in the skin is an urban legend. While the skin does contain approximately half of the total dietary fiber, the majority (more than 50%) of the nutrients are found within the potato itself. The cooking method used can significantly impact the nutrient availability of the potato.



    Also I think sweet potatoes are delicious(even without tons of butter) and they are one of the healthiest foods you can eat.




    Besides simple starches, sweet potatoes are rich in complex carbohydrates, dietary fiber, beta carotene (a vitamin A equivalent nutrient), vitamin C, and vitamin B6.

    In 1992, the Center for Science in the Public Interest compared the nutritional value of sweet potatoes to other vegetables. Considering fiber content, complex carbohydrates, protein, vitamins A and C, iron, and calcium, the sweet potato ranked highest in nutritional value. According to these criteria, sweet potatoes earned 184 points, 100 points over the next on the list, the common potato.(NCSPC)

    Sweet potato varieties with dark orange flesh have more beta carotene than those with light colored flesh and their increased cultivation is being encouraged in Africa where Vitamin A deficiency is a serious health problem. Despite the name "sweet", it may be a beneficial food for diabetics, as preliminary studies on animals have revealed that it helps to stabilize blood sugar levels and to lower insulin resistance.[1] Some Americans, including television personality Oprah Winfrey, are advocating increased consumption of sweet potatoes both for their health benefits and because of their importance in traditional Southern cuisine


    .oh Lord..nevermind that last Oprah part..yikes..I may have to give them up now!
    Don't slap me, cause I'm not in the mood!

  13. #28
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    I do love a nice, baked potato. I still think it's better than a fried chicken sandwich, a large french fries and a large coke.

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