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Thread: Broth or Stock

  1. #1
    Elite Member SammysMom's Avatar
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    Default Broth or Stock

    What exactly is the difference between the two?

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    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Broth or Stock

    Hope this helps.

    http://www.personal.psu.edu/staff/m/...-or-broth.html

    Stock or Broth?

    By the way, if you’ve ever wondered what the difference is between a “stock” and a “broth,” relax: they’re essentially the same thing. Or at least the differences between the two definitions are minor. I have plowed through a library of cooks’ references, including Larousse Gastronomic, The New Food Lover’s Companion, Barbara Kafka’s Soup: A Way of Life, and The New Professional Chef by the Culinary Institute of America. In virtually every case, both “stock” and “broth” are defined as a liquid made from bones and meat, sometimes with vegetables, herbs and seasonings. Most definitions go further to yield circuitous references to “soup” and “bouillon,” which, in the interests of limited clarity, I’ll conveniently skip in this column.

    The latest edition (1997) of the esteemed Joy of Cooking adds its own unique imprint to the murky world of stocks and broths: “Unlike stocks, which are made primarily from bones, broths are made from meat (except for vegetable broth), and they cook for shorter periods of time. The resulting liquid has a fresher, more definable flavor but less body than a stock.” Immediately following this passage is a recipe for chicken broth, which calls for simmering in water a whole chicken, presumably with bones and carcass intact.

    The late Steve Holzinger, who trained many a professional chef, offered the following advice in a column printed here several years back: “A stock is a water extract of food. A broth is a stock made with meat or poultry as distinguished from one made from the bones of meat and poultry. A consommé is a finished broth, one that has great flavor due to the use of considerable amounts of meat or poultry. If properly cooked and skimmed, it will be as clear as a consommé clarified with egg whites.” Clear as mud, once again.

    Actually, what all of these references seem to intend but leave a bit cloudy is that the main distinction of a stock is indeed the richness derived from the gelatin (essentially concentrated protein) released by the bones and cartilage, and to a lesser extent by tendons, skin, and other tissue. Gelatin-rich bones may or may not be dropped into a broth-pot, but even if they are included as an ingredient, it’s always to much less degree than in a stock. Shorter cooking time for a broth also yields less gelatin than a long-simmered stock; hence the resulting broth has almost no gelatin and is thinner.

    When a true stock is chilled, it congeals because of the gelatin. A refrigerated broth remains liquid and flowable. But that’s not to say a broth is totally gelatin-free, as even in a short cooking period the simmered meat protein itself will still leach some gelatin; a broth just contains less gelatin than does a stock. Clear, eh?

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Broth or Stock

    I say broth when it's like a clear soup you can actually eat/drink as a meal. Stock is like a flavoured liquid that I use to make something else like stew, stir fry etc etc. That's just my own distinction though and I'm not a cook or anything.

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  4. #4
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Broth or Stock

    Stock is made from bones and has more fat in it, essentially. Broth can be made from anything -- veggies, fruit -- and tends to be clear, like you said.

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