Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 40

Thread: US recipe books

  1. #1
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,725

    Default US recipe books

    I admit I'm a bit of a recipe book collector (although I only actually USE about 4 of them). Apart from getting used to the different names for certain ingredients, terms and measurements in the US cookbooks I have it struck me the other day how much frozen and canned ingredients are listed. I'm on a low carb kick at the moment and bought a great low carb book with lots of delicious recipes but nearly all the vegetables, including basics like green beans, mushrooms, broccoli etc are frozen. Almost no fresh ingredients at all. Have you ever tasted canned mushrooms? I know that some parts of the US are a long way from fresh sources of fruit and veggies but surely most supermarkets these days sell fresh produce??
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  2. #2
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    surely most supermarkets these days sell fresh produce??
    I've never seen one that didn't. Is that all you want to know, or am I missing the point here?
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  3. #3
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,725

    Default

    Ouch!
    I am making the point that a cook book that purports to contain recipes for health/diet conscious people is pushing the frozen variety more than the fresh which kinda defeats the object of eating veggies because frozen ones are way less nutritious (and flavoursome) than fresh ones. I wondered if there are people in the US who don't have access to fresh (although I can't possibly see why not) so the author suggests frozen all the time. Or maybe it's just a crap recipe book. Or a crap author [walks gingerly off thin ice]
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  4. #4
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    pretending to be a lurker but I'm not quiet enough
    Posts
    15,515

    Default

    Maybe it's more to do with a certain lifestyle, like the book might be catered towards busy super moms/yuppies (who may also be health conscious) or something and using frozen ingredients could cut preparation time etc.

    Canned mushrooms are gross...are they even real?

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

  5. #5
    Elite Member aabbcc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Watching the sun set over Lake Superior.
    Posts
    18,668

    Default

    I have a lot of cookbooks, many written by American and Canadian authors and I haven't noticed an abundance of recipes calling for canned vegetables ... other than canned tomatoes [but they are often better than fresh ones, unless the season is right]. Likewise with frozen vegetables. Frozen peas and corn are quite popular, but again, the fresh stuff is only in season for a short time.

    I would say maybe your cookbook isn't the best. You could probably make the recipes using fresh vegetables, but you would have to adjust the cooking times.
    Last edited by aabbcc; February 3rd, 2007 at 02:17 PM.

  6. #6
    Silver Member tofucheesecake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    380

    Default

    I read that frozen vegetables are actually (unless you get your produce direct from growers and consume it immediately) better than fresh from supermarket, because produce starts losing nutritional value after it is picked. Since frozen vegetables/fruits are frozen immediately after they are picked the nutrients are preserved. But then you have to cook them to thaw them, which I guess ultimately makes them not as good as fresh ones, IMO.

    What cookbooks are you referring to? None of mine call for canned/frozen things, except in cases where that is a more expedient/cost effective way to get them (e.g. artichoke hearts).

  7. #7
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Ouch!
    I am making the point that a cook book that purports to contain recipes for health/diet conscious people is pushing the frozen variety more than the fresh which kinda defeats the object of eating veggies because frozen ones are way less nutritious (and flavoursome) than fresh ones. I wondered if there are people in the US who don't have access to fresh (although I can't possibly see why not) so the author suggests frozen all the time. Or maybe it's just a crap recipe book. Or a crap author [walks gingerly off thin ice]

    Ack! Sorry, didn't mean to sound snippy! I wasn't feeling snippy but in the light of day it kind of sounds that way! Sorry!
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  8. #8
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    in the wild blue yonder
    Posts
    15,479

    Default

    Well, certainly the older cookbooks on both sides of the border call for a lot more canned and frozen veggies than newer ones do, but A*O has a point about some American cookbooks using fewer fresh ingredients than others.

    I have a lot of cookbooks, and I've noticed that. I've also noticed even since I've been on this board that recipes from some, not all, American posters tend to rely more on processed, packaged foods than I am used to. But that is also a lifestyle choice. I've talked to students whose mothers have never cooked them a meal, and they're in their late teens! Everything is convenience food -- frozen, canned or take out.

    Then there is the other extreme where everything is organic, etc. But yes, when I go to American supermarkets, there is a much bigger variety of processed foods than you tend to find here.

    I would eat more frozen meals if they were on a level of some of the really good stuff that I've seen in the U.K. Marks and Spencer and other higher-end supermarkets have gourmet, and very good regular frozen meals. There's no reason why it can't be done here, instead of the crap that we do get.

  9. #9
    Elite Member Lobelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    a backwards hillbilly state
    Posts
    20,801

    Default

    One of these days somebody will get smart & start a line of quality frozen foods on this side of the planet. I would buy them.
    "I've cautiously embraced jeggings"
    Emma Peel aka Pacific Breeze aka Wilde1 aka gogodancer aka maribou

    Yip, yip, yip in your tiny indignation. Bark furiously on, lady dog.

  10. #10
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,725

    Default

    The particular book I'm talking about is "500 Low-Carb Recipes" by Dana Carpender which according to the cover is a "National Best Seller!!!". The recipes ARE good, with some imaginative ideas but I just can't believe the author would suggest frozen broccoli (for example) over fresh. Apart from frozen peas and maybe sweetcorn (both of which should be avoided on a low carb diet anyway) all the other frozen veg I've tasted come a very poor second to fresh. Also, frozen veggies have to be blanched, ie part-cooked, before freezing so you've already lost some nutritional value and flavour. Obviously tinned tomatoes, artichoke hearts, etc are fine - I'm not a total food nazi!
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  11. #11
    Elite Member twitchy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Dancing on your grave!!!!
    Posts
    9,131

    Default

    I've noticed a few cookbooks like that. My aunt-in-law recently gave me one. For me, it's virtually unusable. A package of this and a can of that. Start with a mix and then add a couple of things to it. For some people, that is cooking. You can tell who they are when you stand in line at the grocery and look at the stuff in their carts. (It's a hobby of mine!)

    Nearly every week it seems I meet someone who asks me about the produce I put on the conveyor belt. "What's that?" "Oh....What do you do with it?"

    "The howling backwoods that is IMDB is where film criticism goes to die (and then have its corpse gang-raped, called a racist, and accused of supporting Al-Qaeda)" ----Sean O'Neal, The Onion AV Club

  12. #12
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    in the wild blue yonder
    Posts
    15,479

    Default

    ^^I know what you mean. I am always gawking at people's carts. It always amazes me when recipes call for pre-made spaghetti sauce -- with very few exceptions, I've always made my own. I will admit to using President's Choice low-fat vegetarian Bolognese sauce once in a blue moon, but I always add my own stuff to it.

    I met someone recently who didn't know that Parmesan cheese came in a form other than grated in a container!

    What's the point of cooking for yourself if you're just using pre-made ingredients for the most part? It may be faster, but in most cases, it's a lot more fattening and less nutritous. You may as well eat out.

  13. #13
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,725

    Default

    Yeah - well we've come full circle to previous discussions that people basically don't know how to cook these days. I don't think it's necessarily laziness, although that plays a part, I think they genuinely have no clue how to make simple basics like tomato sauce or an omlette. I admit I look at other people's carts at the supermarket too and make judgments!! It's usually the blokes who buy everything pre-made or in packets with maybe a bunch of bananas as an afterthought.
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  14. #14
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    in the wild blue yonder
    Posts
    15,479

    Default

    Sometimes that's true -- I rememeber being behind one guy in line who bought about 20 frozen dinners -- but a lot of women do it, too. I'm lucky to live in an area where people are pretty health conscious and eat/cook a wide variety of fruits and veggies. It's not as good as parts of Europe (or Melbourne, sigh), but the selection here is pretty good and getting better.

    But a lot of people still rely on fast/packaged foods, especially younger people and families.

  15. #15
    Elite Member missbazilb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    1,560

    Default

    I think it comes down to a lack of knowledge. My parents were absolute food nazis. They (rightly) believed that cooking from scratch with fresh ingredients was better than cooking using processed foods. It was pretty much beaten into me, to the point where I feel extremely guilty if I do buy something like that. Like today, I'm low on funds, and have to buy some food that will have to make several lunches and dinners, so I was trying to think of something that would get me through the next few days, and thought several cans of Chunky soup might work, but I know when I get to the store I'll feel bad about doing that, and will try to opt for something healthier and fresher.

    But I have friends who seem to have no idea that buying juice with added sugar is not healthy, and eat fast food for lunch every day. Bleurgh!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Books you always re-read
    By buttmunch in forum Books and Literature
    Replies: 109
    Last Post: October 16th, 2007, 01:29 AM
  2. Books in '07 - a review log
    By Lani in forum Books and Literature
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: July 14th, 2007, 06:15 PM
  3. Bad Children's Books
    By GeekyGirl in forum Laughs and Oddities
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 28th, 2006, 05:25 AM
  4. Replies: 7
    Last Post: June 8th, 2006, 01:27 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •