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Thread: Among its many other evils, high-fructose corn syrup may aggravate liver disease

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    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    Default Among its many other evils, high-fructose corn syrup may aggravate liver disease

    Sweetener may aggravate liver disease

    Thursday, March 18, 2010

    The daily consumption of high-fructose corn syrup might aggravate liver damage in people who suffer from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a U.S. study suggests.

    The common sweetener is found in beverages, processed foods such as gummy bears and some bread and baked goods. The syrup made from corn is a cheaper alternative to sugar or sucrose and easier to blend and transport because of its liquid form.

    As a mixture, the chemical composition of high-fructose corn syrup differs from sucrose, and might act differently on the human body. Some suggest there's a link between the increased use of high-fructose corn syrup and the growing incidence of diabetes and obesity in North America.

    "We found that increased consumption of high-fructose corn syrup was associated with scarring in the liver, or fibrosis, among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease," Dr. Manal Abdelmalek, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center, said in a news release Thursday.

    Scarred livers

    About 30 per cent of adults in the U.S. have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the researchers said. When fat builds up in the liver, it can cause inflammation, then scarring known as cirrhosis of the liver permanent damage to the liver that leads to a blockage of blood flow through the organ.

    A cirrhotic liver no longer removes toxins effectively, leading to accumulation in the blood that, can in turn, impair mental function and lead to personality changes and possibly a coma, according to the Canadian Liver Foundation.

    In the study, Abdelmalek and her colleagues looked at 427 adults with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease at eight clinical centres in the U.S.
    The team found that 52 per cent of the study subjects consumed between one and six servings a week of fructose-containing beverages and only 19 per cent said they didn't consume any.

    Twenty-nine per cent of the subjects said they drank fructose-containing beverages daily. The people in that group were 2.6 times more likely to show high degrees of fibrosis than those who consumed no fructose-containing beverages.

    The researchers factored in other elements that have been shown to influence NAFLD, including age, sex, body mass index, Hispanic ethnicity and total calorie intake.

    Fructose consumption was estimated based on patients' reports of drinking non-diet soda, fruit juices and other sweetened beverages.

    In 2008, Abdelmalek published a study on a small group of patients showing high-fructose corn syrup was associated with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The new study, published online in the journal Hepatology, goes a step further, linking consumption of the sweetener to progression or worsening of liver injury.

    While only a minority of patients with NAFLD progress to cirrhosis, all are at increased risk of liver failure and liver cancer, which may require a liver transplant. There is no treatment for NAFLD.

    Diet changes for patients

    "Our findings suggest that we may need to go back to healthier diets that are more holistic," Abdelmalek said. "High-fructose corn syrup, which is predominately in soft drinks and processed foods, may not be as benign as we previously thought."

    The study, as well as previous laboratory research on human and animal tissue, suggest the body metabolizes high-fructose corn syrup in a way that affects insulin sensitivity. Most dietary fructose is processed in the liver.

    The results suggest that for patients with NAFLD, reducing the intake of high-fructose corn syrup might be a way to avoid worsening of their disease, the study's authors concluded.

    The effect could be similar to the way that low-fat diets reduce the risk of heart disease, Abdelmalek said, even though research on the effect of diet-modification isn't as advanced for liver disease as it is for heart disease.

    The next step in the research is to do formal studies that evaluate whether limiting or cutting out high-fructose corn syrup from a patient's diet pays off in health benefits.

    Consumers looking to reduce their intake of high-fructose corn syrup can cut back on soft drinks and sweetened beverages, limit candy, cookies, cakes, pies, doughnuts, granola bars, pastries and other baked goods with "glucose-fructose" on the label.

    The Corn Refiners Association has launched an aggressive advertising campaign to counter criticism of high-fructose corn syrup, saying it "has the same natural sweeteners as table sugar."

    The Center for Science in the Public Interest notes that high-fructose corn syrup and sucrose are identical nutritionally, and the harmful effects of high-fructose corn syrup could just be an urban myth.

    Nevertheless, the group includes the sweetener in its list of additives to be wary of, advising it "may pose a risk and needs to be better tested. Try to avoid."

    One of the study's authors has written a book on the potential role of fructose in obesity and fatty liver disease and has a patent on lowering uric acid to reduce fatty liver disease. No other authors had conflicts of interest.

    source

    and it's filled with delicious mercury! http://www.gossiprocks.com/forum/hea...orn-syrup.html
    As Canadian as possible under the circumstances

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    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    Latest high-fructose corn syrup study generates buzz, debate
    By Hanna Raskin, Special to CNN

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS
    -Study: High-fructose corn syrup causes more significant weight gain than table sugar

    -Critics: Study unfairly demonizes corn syrup and absolves cane sugar of causing weight gain

    -Rats were fed water with high-fructose corn syrup and they developed more belly fat

    -The rats also had increased level of circulating triglycerides, fat's chemical form in the body

    (CNN) -- Acolytes of "Food Rules" guru Michael Pollan and other well-meaning foodies who've made corn a scapegoat for the nation's health crises have welcomed a new study from Princeton University that suggests high-fructose corn syrup causes more significant weight gain than table sugar.

    But the findings have been criticized by food science experts and industry veterans, who say the study unfairly demonizes corn syrup and implicitly absolves cane sugar of responsibility for making Americans fat.

    "The debate about which one is better for you is a false debate, because neither of them is good for you," says Elizabeth Abbott, author of the forthcoming "Sugar: A Bittersweet History."

    Researcher Miriam Bocarsly counters that the study wasn't designed to demonstrate "what sugar does for the body." Instead, her team set out to uncover what happens when rats subsist on a diet rich in high-fructose corn syrup for six months. They reported that rats fed water sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup developed more belly fat and had an increased level of circulating triglycerides, fat's chemical form in the body.

    "As far as we're aware, this is the first long-term study of high-fructose corn syrup in animals," Bocarsly says. "That's important, because you don't eat high-fructose corn syrup once; you eat it every day, probably since you were a child. But you don't see too many studies with humans because you can't keep someone in the lab for 10 years and make them eat high fructose corn syrup."

    According to Bocarsly, scientific results embraced by the refined corn crowd, including a 2008 statement by the American Medical Association that high-fructose syrups do not contribute more to obesity than other caloric sweeteners, used data drawn from short-term studies.

    Detractors point out what they say are even more devastating flaws in the Princeton study, including the decision to examine male and female rats in separate experiments and to attribute significance to statistically indistinguishable weights.

    "I'm skeptical," leading food policy scholar Marion Nestle writes in a blog post. "I don't think the study produces convincing evidence of a difference between the effects of HFCS and sucrose on the body weight of rats."

    Bocarsly responds: "What we did in the lab was what was most interesting scientifically. We're a behavioral neuroscience lab, so what we're interested in finding is how these foods affect your brain chemistry. We hope this is the first step in a long series of research."

    Makers of high-fructose corn syrup were not pleased by Bocarsly going public with admittedly preliminary findings, which they suspect some consumers will interpret as another reason to avoid high-fructose corn syrup.

    Audrae Erickson, president of the Corn Refiners Association, characterizes the study as an example of "efforts to disparage high-fructose corn syrup and perhaps drive it out of the marketplace."

    "No one ingredient could possibly be responsible for all the diseases attributed to this natural sweetener," Erickson says. "We believe consumers are being misled into thinking there's something different about this sweetener."

    Pepsi recently tried to capitalize on the anxiety surrounding high-fructose corn syrup, stoked partly by food policy critics such as Eric Schlosser and lifestyle gurus including Andrew Weil.

    The company late last year debuted throwback versions of Pepsi and Mountain Dew featuring "real sugar."

    But Abbott, who's chronicled the Western world's obsession with sweetness, says the distinction between sugars from different sources is being overplayed.

    Eaters just want to have their cakes and eat them without worrying about wellness too. Depicting cane sugar as a healthy sweetener creates an appealing solution to that bugaboo, she says.

    "By having cane sugar, you're not doing yourself a great big favor," she says. "Not so much sugar is what we should be striving for."


    Find this article at:
    Latest high-fructose corn syrup study generates buzz, debate - CNN.com
    2008 Cable News Network

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    Elite Member burnt_toast's Avatar
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    Since I've been diagnosed with my corn allergy and stopped consuming all corn (in all it's forms) I have found managing my weight to be almost effortless. Sure, I get on kicks of eating too much peanut butter, but when I cut it out for a few weeks, it's gone - easily and completely.

    My weight was not this easy to manage when I was consuming corn. Now, that could be because of the allergy itself causing water retention, bloating, etc ... but I have to wonder about the prevalence of corn in the American diet in general. It's in everything! We were not designed to consume so much of the same thing.

    I have no science to back up that thought, it's just a thought - but the vast quantity of corn we are consuming (and most of the time unawares) makes me wonder.

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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    Goddamn corn.
    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
    Laugh Uncontrollably. And never regret ANYTHING that makes you smile.

    - Mark Twain

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    Elite Member Moongirl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brookie View Post
    Goddamn corn.
    and goddamn children of the corn...

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    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
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    And beef fed on corn. Cows weren't designed to eat it either.
    As Canadian as possible under the circumstances

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    "What's traitors, precious?" -- President Gollum

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    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
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    I love corn! I would rather have my chocolate allergy than a corn one. But you are so right BT- when you are allergic to anything it can do all sorts of weird things to your bod. This study, while not big enough and no doubt will end up reversed, does make me think. Soft drinks are just not healthy. They should be avoided, except on rare occasions. We are gulping them down-just look at how many you see in grocery baskets. I think a hefty tax on them would help lower the usage.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

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    A corn allergy sure as hell makes you healthier. No soda for me! Not for a year now and my skin looks fantastic! Water is your friend.

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    Gold Member eboni's Avatar
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    Have been preaching the ills of HFC for a few years now along with the evils of highly processed food, if you can call it food. Every since my California history professor turned us on to why our store bought tomatoes tasted so bland (a university invented a tomato that wouldn't bruise during picking and transporting) I've been watchful of what I consume.
    ...Stopped smoking on March 8, 2011. Was trying to put a fancy ticker in my signature but it didn't work...

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    fgg
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnt_toast View Post
    Since I've been diagnosed with my corn allergy and stopped consuming all corn (in all it's forms) I have found managing my weight to be almost effortless.
    what were your symptoms? how did you figure out it was corn?

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    Elite Member burnt_toast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fgg View Post
    what were your symptoms? how did you figure out it was corn?
    Oh heavens, there's a whole thread about it somewhere. I had all kinds of bizarre symptoms, but the one that sent me over the top was major gastrointestinal issues, nausea and pain with every meal. I also had major dizziness and weakness after some meals (I didn't know then it was my blood pressure plummeting).

    My doctor was entirely unhelpful and sent me for a myriad of tests. My husband had me do an experiment and eat a spoonful of sugar, which made me immediately very ill. At that point I knew it was food related. Long story short, I did an elimination diet and all of my symptoms went away. A reintroduction of honey to my diet gave me hives ... so off to the allergist.

    I've had symptoms all my life in the form of mild hives, blisters on my hands periodically, water retention and low blood pressure. It wasn't until I was in my 30's that my reactions got strong enough that I was forced to acknowledge a larger issue.

    It could be alot worse, but American foods, food packaging, processing and general overuse of corn makes things very difficult (e.g. in some cities they put Citric Acid in the water. Citric Acid is usually manufactured on a corn based medium. I know of other corn allergics who have to bathe in bottled water, wash their clothes in bottled water and/or buy a distiller for their home).

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