Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23

Thread: Gucci and Prada...for your 12 year old

  1. #1
    SVZ
    SVZ is offline
    Do fish have boogers? SVZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Venus
    Posts
    1,000,003,609

    Default Gucci and Prada...for your 12 year old

    Gucci and Prada for the under-13 crowd
    By Alana Semuels
    Times Staff Writer

    November 24, 2006

    Dressed in pink Uggs, Seven jeans and a matching pink sweater and cap, Elizabeth Cohen looks the epitome of hip as she winds her way through the holiday crowds at the Grove shopping center in Los Angeles.

    She is a discerning consumer — her Ugg boots are not knockoffs, and she names Prada and Dolce & Gabbana as her favorite brands.

    She's also 10 years old.

    "I ask her, 'What do you need these for?' " said her mother, Jane Cohen of Bel-Air, who shops mostly at vintage stores and garage sales.

    But the 10-year-old is hardly unusual. Elizabeth and other "tweens" — kids who are 8 to 12 — are expected to contribute to growing demand for luxury goods this winter.

    Today, the season shopfest begins in earnest with day-after-Thanksgiving sales, crowds and traffic jams. For tweens and their older teenage counterparts, the search is on for expensive accessories, belts, purses and perhaps a pair of shoes such as those seen in fashion shows and glossy magazines.

    "There's a huge uptick in teens shopping for traditional luxury brands," said Jim Taylor, vice chairman of the Harrison Group, a strategic marketing firm that recently conducted a survey of teenagers' preferences. "Having a Gucci scarf is part of being a kid today."

    To be sure, even on the affluent Westside of Los Angeles, these youths rarely have closets full of luxury goods.

    Many, including Elizabeth, also shop at stores such as Target or Gap, looking for bargains. Frequently, they mix and match with luxury accessories.

    "It's not only the rich communities — it's anywhere that kids have an income," Kurt Barnard, president of Barnard's Retail Consulting Group in New York, said about teens and tweens buying luxury products. "A lot more kids earn money than used to, and they feel they have the right to spend their money as they see fit."

    Taylor said many of the teenagers buy these brands with allowance money or wages earned from part-time jobs. This can lead to a fair amount of spending on brands once known only to the rich and famous.

    "They're 100% more brand-conscious today than they used to be," said Fraser Ross, owner of the upscale Robertson Boulevard store Kitson. "A 12-year-old will know what Louis Vuitton is."

    Kitson is known as a high-end Westside celebrity haunt, near the Ivy restaurant. A year ago, Ross added Kitson Kids nearby, but he said tweens still prefer items at his main store, such as $190 Seven for All Mankind jeans and $650 Isabella Fiore handbags.

    Many of these customers, he said, see celebrities wearing certain brands and buy the same ones. Some browse the store aisles while their mothers have lunch at the Ivy. "I call them ABC girls — Armani, Blahnik, Chanel," Ross said. "They wear everything branded."

    Nor is the interest just among girls. Ever-expanding Kitson opened a men's store in September. He included clothes in small sizes to appeal to younger boys — often propelled to the store by their girlfriends, Ross said.

    The interest in these brands isn't just for the wealthy either, Kim Ciliberto said. She owns the Woodland Hills-based Tutti Bella, an e-retailer selling upscale baby and children's clothing, such as embroidered pants by Nolita Pocket, an Italian brand, for $176.95.

    Ciliberto's sales have more than doubled in the last year, and her customer base is spread across the nation. Some of her clients buy the expensive items for a special occasion, she said, but others splurge on fancy baby and children's gear for everyday wear.

    "Both parents and their kids are more label-conscious," Ciliberto said. "Parents start when kids are babies, and by the time kids are older, they recognize the brands."

    Part of this interest comes from baby boomers who have grown up in affluence, said Marshal Cohen, chief analyst at the NPD Group. In part, parents "want to show their status through their kids," he said.

    Cohen expects that this holiday season the interest in brands will lead to the "one for you, one for me" phenomenon, in which a mother buying a Coach bag for her 8-year-old daughter will also buy one for herself — a boon for luxury retailers.

    Designer apparel represents about 9% of teenage clothing purchases, Cohen said, far greater than the percentage just a few years ago.

    But if you ask the customers, it's not always Mom and Dad who spur an interest in brands and support luxury purchases. It's often quite the opposite.

    Alex Demopoulos, 12, of Santa Barbara recently stopped by the Coach store at the Grove during a visit to Los Angeles. She had her eye on a brown purse with a white stripe selling for more than $130. She and friend Caitlin Connor, also 12, said their favorite brands were Burberry, Juicy Couture and Gucci.

    Their mothers said they shopped at stores such as Target and J. Crew.

    "It all started when she was 10, on a trip to Rome," said Cherie Demopoulos, Alex's mother. "Her cousin kept talking about brands. I guess you need an older teen to show you the ropes."

    Kids also learn of the brands from reality TV, celebrity reports and magazines such as Teen Vogue, said Samantha Skey, a senior vice president at Alloy Media and Marketing, a New York-based youth research and marketing firm.

    During their tween years, kids switch from being influenced by their parents and the brands they buy to being influenced by their peers and the brands they aspire to own.

    For many tweens, identifying with a brand is part of developing an identity independent from their parents. This generation's tweens and teens have grown up confident that they will have lucrative careers, so they feel entitled to own luxury brands.

    But much of the interest in these brands is purely aspirational, Skey said.

    "The number of teens owning BMWs has not significantly increased," she said. "But the number of teens aware of BMWs has increased a great deal."

    For many, this means getting access to luxury products any way they can, such as buying knockoffs or looking for deals online. Elizabeth Cohen said many of her friends share designer handbags with their mothers.

    For Lauren VanderLinden, 12, earning money to spend on luxury items makes her appreciate her purchases more. The Long Beach resident was recently at the Coach store at the Grove looking for a beige wallet to match her Coach bag. She had saved up money from pet-sitting and from a recent birthday and was picky enough to leave the store after a thorough search without making a purchase.

    Confronted with the idea that she could buy a dozen bags from Target for the price of one from Coach, Lauren said she was set on a name-brand bag. Even though her school does not allow girls to carry purses, she said that after school or on the weekends, such bags are the thing to have. "Most of my friends really want one," she said. "They just like looking at it, I guess."
    http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/...l=la-home-style

  2. #2
    Elite Member Grimmlok's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    In WhoreLand fucking your MOM
    Posts
    55,372

    Default

    Oh god, in 10 years we're going to have another 80's decade of ME ME ME once these spoiled brats grow up
    I am from the American CIA and I have a radio in my head. I am going to kill you.

  3. #3
    Elite Member LynnieD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    34,695

    Default

    I have a 2 yr old, where's the shit for her? Geez.....she has to wait until she's 10? What a gip.

    haha

  4. #4
    Elite Member Laurent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Out There
    Posts
    38,186

    Default

    Buying designer is pointless until they stop growing, otherwise you're buying those hideous ass Ugg boots every year to accomodate their milk hormone induced growing feet.

    Taylor said many of the teenagers buy these brands with allowance money or wages earned from part-time jobs.
    If your kid can buy Dolce & Gabbana off their allowance, it's time to cut the fuck back.
    “What are you looking at, sugar-tits?” - Mel Gibson

  5. #5
    Gold Member misskris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,196

    Default

    This makes me so sad. It's totally degraded the special quality of really nice gifts. If someone had given me a Hermes scarf or another expensive luxury when I was ten, I would have been like, nice scarf, could I have a dolly?
    I see it amongst friends' much younger siblings and I don't understand how parents can support this sort of nonsense.

  6. #6
    Gold Member IceQueen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    969

    Default

    So what I'm getting from the article is that the parents spoil their children or allegedly the kids come up with $695 to drop on a purse all by themselves and this is quite the norm everywhere. Did I miss anything, like uh - reality?

  7. #7
    Gold Member misskris's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,196

    Default

    Lol - these kids must have a ridiculous allowance if they can afford this stuff. I'm pretty sure I got approx 1 dollar up till I was about 10, then thereafter, maybe 5 dollars. I would have been saving a damn long time before I got so much as Gucci or Prada keychain.

  8. #8
    Elite Member Mr. Authority's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Royal Oak,MI
    Posts
    4,631

    Default

    I think it's the parents buying these expensive items. How else would a 10 yr old be able to buy anything from Prada? This is just one of the reasons why people are getting poor, along with the economy being shitty, people are buying stuff and charging it with little disposable income.
    If these parents would explain this problem then they would'nt have to deal with these spoiled shits.

  9. #9
    Elite Member louiswinthorpe111's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Middle America
    Posts
    11,554

    Default

    For most parents, it's easier to give in than it is to say no.

    Recently on Dr. Phil, there was a woman who was buying ridiculously expensive things for her 17 year old daughter. Designer clothes/purses, computer, cars, etc... SHE HAD NO JOB. The daughter didn't ask her mother how she was paying for these things, and really didn't care as long as she got what she wanted. Turns out, the mother stole the clothing & purses and worked out of her house as a prostitute while her daughter was at school. SHE WOULD RATHER PIMP HERSELF OUT THAN SAY NO TO HER CHILD. That, I find truly amazing.

  10. #10
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sleepy night night land
    Posts
    22,370

    Default

    You should see the kids where I live. It's insane. What they wear, drive, carry as purses, etc. When they're 10 the parents might think it's cute, but when they're 25 and can't find a job to support the lifestyle they have become accustomed to, it's scary. Here in Orange County, people can't even afford a decent apartment on entry level salaries, so they live at home, drive BMW's, wear designer clothes and carry designer handbags. Then, they marry some poor schmuck that can afford to buy them whatever they want, pop out a kid or two and get divorced and take half.

  11. #11
    Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    32

    Default

    These Parents should be Slapped to allow there young kids to buy that kind of clothing or be slapped for buying it for them. im 24 and don't own one piece of designer clothing because i can't afford it. sure i would love to own a designer purse or a nice pair of designer shoes but whatever i don't mind my purse from target and my cute payless shoes for now. gosh when i was 10 the big " designer " labels were Gap, LA Gear, nike, Fila, etc. neither me nor none of the kids in my school had heard of Chanel, Gucci, Prada or any of the other big names. im from a small town in michigan where those stores don't even exist. you have to drive to like detroit to find those places. i would never allow my kid to spend that kind of money on clothing. kids are so messy as is. i never got an allowance growing up. i would babysit my neices and nephews a few hours if i wanted money and the most i ever got was 10 to $ 15 and then i would go blow it on makeup and those teen magazines at kmart lol. these parents are stupid don't they know that there turning there kids into paris and lindsay clones?

  12. #12
    Silver Member Biatch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Hell's Kitchen
    Posts
    599

    Default

    Well , there is pressure on parents to buy this stuff, too- especially if they can afford it or their kids go to a place where are other spolied brats.

    I try to be as cheap as possible when buying for my 3 year old but you should see the kids he was going with at nursery!!!- all dressed up in designer gear!!!

    I agree, it is ridiculous, because one fashion obsessed mom is pushing her friend to go clothes shopping...next you know, another mom feels bad for not buying top gear for her tot, then another follows suit... By the time your own kid joins, everyone is parading their kids in a fashion meeting(!!) and you have no choice but to a).look cheap with your kid because he is the only one not dressed in top gear;b). buy the stuff and blend in the crowd.

    Many will say- well, better look cheap!! But then your family(friends) goes to pick up the kid- sees the others in those outfits and the pressure begins.As my kid's godfather and my best friend- they are very much into fashion and buy the tot loads of branded clothes.
    You get presents from some high-end boutiques , too.As I bought my coat, the designer felt her duty to send me a baby boy variation of my own purchase!!.What was I to do?Throw it?Then we bought him shoes -which we try to buy the best possible, so he is not destrying his feet- and we got a 3rd pair ..compliments of the store.
    So the stores do give away stuff-in the hope they get you to go back and buy more-force of habit, pressure from other moms,fashion trend etc.
    ----------------------

    Respect is given when respect is deserved.

  13. #13
    La vie en rose DitaPage*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    37,547

    Default

    Sad, sad, sad, sad.

    Its the parents fault though, pressure or not, they need to put their foot down.

  14. #14
    Elite Member PinkCadillac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,434

    Default

    It's the parents' fault

  15. #15
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    4,103

    Default

    I buy most of my kid's clothes from either a twice-yearly huge consignment sale or Target/Old Navy. Once in a blue moon, if we find a good sale or are just feeling generous, we will spring for something at Gap Kids or Children's Place or Gymboree. And we really feel like we are doing something big when we buy from those places. That's as "designer" as we get. My son recently got a pair of Sketchers. It was his first pair of "stylish" shoes. He generally wears New Balance or Target shoes.

    At least for now, in the circles we run in, people would look at you like you were crazy if you bought some Gucci or Prada stuff for your little kid. All the moms I know brag about how they found that cute Gymboree dress for only $5 at the consignment sale.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 2nd, 2006, 01:37 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: November 1st, 2006, 01:17 PM
  3. Replies: 27
    Last Post: October 30th, 2006, 03:17 PM
  4. Chloe Sevigny at "Gucci by Gucci" (10/25/2006)
    By Otaku in forum Photo Archive
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: October 30th, 2006, 12:07 PM
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: September 11th, 2006, 12:01 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •