Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 168
Like Tree267Likes

Thread: Leslie Van Houten, Former Manson Family Member, Granted Parole

  1. #31
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by faithanne View Post
    ^I get a lot of satisfaction knowing our worst are growing old in maximum security. I wouldn't get the same feeling if the government was allowed to murder them legally. And there's always the chance they're innocent - not much awesomeness in a posthumous pardon.

    And it's obviously not much of a deterrent.
    Well, nobody who has been executed has ever gone on to murder again - except maybe Freddit Krueger and CandyMan. That is 100% deterrence.

    When the government executes someone after a trial and sentencing phase, it is not murder. Murder is the unlawful taking of someone's life.

  2. #32
    Elite Member faithanne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    On the Hellmouth
    Posts
    12,425

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    When the government executes someone after a trial and sentencing phase, it is not murder.
    Depends where you live. In all those countries coloured blue on sput's map, it would be.

    And of course I'm talking about a deterrent to others, not to the ones already sentenced.
    Serendipity likes this.
    "You're going to die tomorrow, Lord Bolton. Sleep well."



  3. #33
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sleepy night night land
    Posts
    22,373

    Default

    To be honest, I don't think that any punishment really works as a deterrent. Whether it's life in prison or the death penalty. People who are going to kill are going to do just that. Kill. One of the reasons is that people really don't seem to think they're going to get caught. They all think they're going to get away with it. That goes for pretty much any crime, from petty theft right up to murder.

    I honestly don't think most people, about to commit a crime, think about the consequences of getting caught beforehand. Or do we, as a society, really have that many people just holding themselves back from being a criminal because they are worried about jail?

  4. #34
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KrisNine View Post
    I honestly don't think most people, about to commit a crime, think about the consequences of getting caught beforehand. Or do we, as a society, really have that many people just holding themselves back from being a criminal because they are worried about jail?
    One of the things my company designs and installs is surveillance/access control systems. The CEO has a phrase he is fond of - and I'm probably paraphrasing - "locks keep honest people honest". It's kind of a combination of the philosophy that 1) it is hard to defeat a criminal who wants to defeat your security system, and 2) there are a pretty good number of people out there who are opportunistic thieves - if it looks easy to take, and easy to get away with - they are going to take that shot.
    panic likes this.

  5. #35
    Gold Member VeraGemini's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    What am I doing in this handbasket?
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by albatross View Post
    Because the federal government has the death penalty, it can be imposed in any state in the US regardless of the state law.
    Which they almost never do because that runs afoul of two hot potato political issues (states rights and the death penalty itself), plus it's expensive as fuck compared to a non-capital case. There are currently 62 prisoners on death row from a Federal conviction (68, if you also count military court convictions), and 2,875 on state death rows. Since 1976, the Feds have executed 3 people. One single county in Texas (Harris, where Houston is located) has executed over 100.


  6. #36
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    16,922

    Default

    California has over 700 on death row, but has only executed 13 since 1978--the last one in 2006, a 76 year old man who had spent 23 years there. The average appeals process is 25 years. San Quentin loses more DR inmates to suicide and death from other causes than actual executions. Really, what is the point...the taxpayers not only pay to house these inmates, which I'm guessing is more costly than the lifers, but also all the legal fees for the appeals.
    stella blue likes this.
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



  7. #37
    Elite Member Air Quotes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    13,977

    Default

    I'm in the minority but I truly think she was a young dingbat brainwashed by a psychopath in a cult like setting and deserves a shot at what life she has left.
    "A true whore just loves her life." - Sluce

  8. #38
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    California has over 700 on death row, but has only executed 13 since 1978--the last one in 2006, a 76 year old man who had spent 23 years there. The average appeals process is 25 years. San Quentin loses more DR inmates to suicide and death from other causes than actual executions. Really, what is the point...the taxpayers not only pay to house these inmates, which I'm guessing is more costly than the lifers, but also all the legal fees for the appeals.
    I don't care what it cost to execute William Bonin in California, it was worth it. Brandon Wilson, who slit the throat of a 9-year-old boy inside a restroom while his parent waited outside, admitted it, deserved the death penalty he got, and said he would do it again. He killed himself before they could execute him, but either way he is off our planet.

  9. #39
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    16,922

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Air Quotes View Post
    I'm in the minority but I truly think she was a young dingbat brainwashed by a psychopath in a cult like setting and deserves a shot at what life she has left.
    I get that, and I really do feel for young offenders who made tragic mistakes and gave up their chance at a normal life forever. We were all young and maybe stupid once and there by the grace of god and all that...but then I look back at myself at 19 and ask if there was any way, with my not fully developed brain, would I have let someone influence me to the point that I would stab a stranger repeatedly? And I have to say the answer is NO. I can have empathy for her and where her bad choices left her but she was still capable of doing something I can't even imagine.

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    I don't care what it cost to execute William Bonin in California, it was worth it. Brandon Wilson, who slit the throat of a 9-year-old boy inside a restroom while his parent waited outside, admitted it, deserved the death penalty he got, and said he would do it again. He killed himself before they could execute him, but either way he is off our planet.
    I get that too, but my point is, if the death penalty doesn't really mean execution within a reasonable time frame in many cases, it's a bit pointless. Scott Peterson's been sitting in San Quentin for 12 years now, do you think Laci's parents will even be alive to see the sentence carried out, if it ever happens?
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



  10. #40
    Silver Member albatross's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    401

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VeraGemini View Post
    Which they almost never do because that runs afoul of two hot potato political issues (states rights and the death penalty itself), plus it's expensive as fuck compared to a non-capital case. There are currently 62 prisoners on death row from a Federal conviction (68, if you also count military court convictions), and 2,875 on state death rows. Since 1976, the Feds have executed 3 people. One single county in Texas (Harris, where Houston is located) has executed over 100.
    Of the 62 federal death row inmates, 7 of them were convicted and sentenced in non-death row states. Since 1988, the Justice Department has sought the death penalty in non-death row states nearly 100 times. As a matter of fact, the US government hasn't even been content to stay within the 50 states and has sought the death penalty at least 4 times in Puerto Rico, which does not have the death penalty.

    However, none of that is even relevant, my point was that because the federal government can seek the death penalty in every state, the map of the US should not be a patchwork.
    sputnik likes this.
    Dear Buddha, please bring me a pony and a plastic rocket...

  11. #41
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixie View Post
    I get that too, but my point is, if the death penalty doesn't really mean execution within a reasonable time frame in many cases, it's a bit pointless. Scott Peterson's been sitting in San Quentin for 12 years now, do you think Laci's parents will even be alive to see the sentence carried out, if it ever happens?
    It's pretty bad that it takes so long to carry out, but I'm also satisfied that a person who is a sadistic killer Brandon , or a spree/serial killer is living under the specter of death. However, I would like the execution to happen sooner rather than later. There are a lot of crimes I believe in restorative justice for, but there are others where I believe in retributive justice, and a John Wayne Gacy, Jeffrey Dahmer, Danny Rolling, Ted Bundy are those examples.
    Beeyotch likes this.

  12. #42
    Gold Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Antartica.
    Posts
    1,181

    Default

    She may not be as bad as the others, but she has no business being released into society again. She should die in prison.

    I do not support the death penalty anymore. All it does is kill that person. It doesn't bring anyone back. I wouldn't support it for anyone. Even the ones mentioned above, like Ted Bundy.

    On a side note. I do not understand what is so fascinating about Manson. I get the fascination of Bundy, Kemper, and people like that. But Manson is just a little asshole that acts crazy infront of a camera. I just don't get it. I could read about killers all day long and would never have any care to look into his shit. Yes, I am kinda fascinated by serial killers. He wasn't one tho. He just got some crazy people to do it for him.
    stella blue and lindsaywhit like this.

  13. #43
    Elite Member C_is_for_Cookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    3,491

    Default

    One of my former co-worker's son and daughter in law were murdered in Texas while visiting on military ground, which made it a federal case if my facts are correct. The men who did it are on death row in Indiana(I think it's Indiana, it's definitely a mid west state). She told us many times how she wished they would just get it over with because she felt they didn't deserve to live, she would be able to die in peace and join her only child in heaven.

    It was a horrific story, I had chills running down my spine the first time I heard about it.
    avatar made by green_queen@LJ

  14. #44
    Elite Member gas_chick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    35,112

    Default

    The facts are that she didn't actually kill anyone. Yep she was there and an accessory and deserved to be punished but I think she's gotten more than anyone else in a less publicized crime would ever get. She probably would have been granted the chance at immunity but she wasn't present at the Tate murders so she wasn't much help to the prosecution there.
    I am going to come and burn the fucking house down... but you will blow me first."

  15. #45
    Elite Member Trixie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    exiled and ostrich sized
    Posts
    16,922

    Default

    So if you hold someone down while somebody else stabs them it doesn't count as murder? And then stabbing that person several times once they're down? Yes, there is some question whether Rosemary LaBianca was already dead when Van Houten stabbed her and the autopsy did show several post-mortem wounds, so that was just desecration of a corpse? How did Van Houten know whether the victim was dead or alive at that point? Did she take her pulse before she stabbed her?
    joebob and lindsaywhit like this.
    These people don't give a fuck about YOU or us. It's a message board, for Christ's sake. ~ mrs.v ~
    ~"Fuck off! Aim higher! Get a life! Get away from me!" ~the lovely and talented Miss Julia Roberts~



Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 20th, 2015, 07:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •