Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 31 to 37 of 37
Like Tree34Likes

Thread: Indian woman fights off drunk sex attacker, single-handedly drags to police station

  1. #31
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,283

    Default

    While women feel unsafe as a general rule, there's no reason to make them any more unsafe (or feel unsafe) than they already are.

    I think in the case of countries where this has been a common practice, killing the perp would result in a paradigm shift about what's at stake when you strike out to maliciously wound a woman. Crimes without severe punishment don't seem as severe when there is nothing at stake for the perp. I also admit there are other things that would help - such as make it a hell of a lot harder to buy sulfuric acid, and teach children about respect for women and conflict resolution skills at an early age.

    There is no such thing as a sentence to life in solitary. Solitary is something you get once you are on the inside and you somehow screw up while you are in there. It's definitely highly debatable whether putting certain people in prison in life is even that much of a punishment - Manson was unhappy to get out prison and happy to go back in. Jack Henry Abbott was a creature of prison and should have never been let out in the first place. I don't think they are suffering by going back in to prison for life. But the members of Tate's family sure are suffering.

    With respect to vengeance or retributive justice. Personally, I believe in restorative justice for a lot of crimes - where someone else's life was not taken, or incredible cruelty was not exhibited. If you violently rape a child or wantonly take someone's life, however, there is no way of squaring or making good the offense. I believe most murders merit no more than a life sentence. Serial killers, child killers, spree killers, or sadists deserve death. I think it's cruel and perverse and sadistic for society to continue to shelter, clothe and feed people who have committed those crimes.

  2. #32
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    On Howard Stern's Sybian
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    No matter what side of the debate you fall on, you guys have made some really stellar points- this thread has has been an interesting read. I see Bar exams in your futures!
    "You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."

  3. #33
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,283

    Default

    I definitely see a bar in my future [wanders off to see if there is any vodka left.....].
    Clubber Lang likes this.

  4. #34
    Elite Member witchcurlgirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Acerbia
    Posts
    32,422

    Default

    There is no such thing as a sentence to life in solitary.

    Actually there is, here in the good old USA. Even if we don't call it that. People like Anthony Casso and Zacarais Moussaoui
    serve their sentences doing 23 hours a day alone in their cells in a Supermax prison.

    Just how bad are American 'supermax'
    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-17663629




    And there is no capital punishment for acid attacks in India, yet you're suggesting the law be changed to make it so. So changes can be made. Why not change it to a sentence like Casso's.


    But the members of Tate's family sure are suffering.
    As I noted upthread I lost a family member to murder, so I know that they suffer. Killing the criminal won't end that, we suffer over our loss, and killing their murderer doesn't give our loved one back.
    All of God's children are not beautiful. Most of God's children are, in fact, barely presentable.


    If I wanted the government in my womb I'd fuck a Senator

  5. #35
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,283

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post

    Actually there is, here in the good old USA. Even if we don't call it that. People like Anthony Casso and Zacarais Moussaoui
    serve their sentences doing 23 hours a day alone in their cells in a Supermax prison.
    And there is no capital punishment for acid attacks in India, yet you're suggesting the law be changed to make it so. So changes can be made. Why not change it to a sentence like Casso's.
    From looking at the article about Moussaui and Casso, I don't think that India has the infrastructure in place to put guys like this in that kind of isolation. If it were possible to put them in there for life, and the public knew that these were the consequences, I think it would be a good alternative to the death penalty.

    Quote Originally Posted by witchcurlgirl View Post

    As I noted upthread I lost a family member to murder, so I know that they suffer. Killing the criminal won't end that, we suffer over our loss, and killing their murderer doesn't give our loved one back.
    Right, but we were also talking about whether the criminal actually suffers in prison. Manson and Abbott are just two of many examples of criminals who did not. Sending them to prison is sending them back to their home. It's almost like it's not even a punishment.

  6. #36
    Super Moderator Tati's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Your Pocket
    Posts
    17,993

    Default

    What about in cases where the victims or the survivors don't want to see the perpetrator suffer or be killed? I have to say, it really seems like many proponents of the death penalty are not actually people who have lost someone in these horrible circumstances, and yet the psyches and supposed desire for "justice" of the latter are always trotted out in support of harsher penalties. I've known people who have quite deliberately said "I choose peace" when trying to move forward after losing someone (in a spree killing, as you mentioned, Mo).

    For me, the death penalty question tends to come back to - I'll say it - an episode of Law & Order I once saw (setting aside the issue of wrongful convictions for the time being). The episode started with an execution, and then followed the day of all those involved in getting the perp behind bars and convicted. Let's just say, it fucked them all up rather thoroughly. These were (fictional) characters who started their careers in a New York state which didn't have the death penalty, and then it did. Quite possibly they never signed up for having a hand in putting someone to death and never wanted such a thing on their conscience. But they don't get a say because either the loudest voices or some lawmaker decided for them. I can see many victims themselves feeling the same way and I can only imagine what that added layer of... something might do to someone.

    To me, the death penalty just doesn't seem to actually work on any level, so wouldn't choosing less death rather than more be the wisest path?
    If you reveal your secrets to the wind you should not blame the wind for revealing them to the trees.

    - Kahlil Gibran

  7. #37
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,283

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tati View Post
    What about in cases where the victims or the survivors don't want to see the perpetrator suffer or be killed? I have to say, it really seems like many proponents of the death penalty are not actually people who have lost someone in these horrible circumstances, and yet the psyches and supposed desire for "justice" of the latter are always trotted out in support of harsher penalties. I've known people who have quite deliberately said "I choose peace" when trying to move forward after losing someone (in a spree killing, as you mentioned, Mo).
    I think a victim stating they don't want their attacker executed would be a mitigating factor. However, from everything I've read so far, the victims tend to be overwhelmingly in favor of having their attackers executed. I didn't realize it until now, but Bangladesh did introduce the death penalty in 2002 for acid attackers(link). And they have had a sharp reduction in attacks since then.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 30th, 2013, 04:48 PM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: September 7th, 2010, 08:20 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •