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Thread: Norwegian killer Breivik sentenced to 21 years (!)

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    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Default Norwegian killer Breivik sentenced to 21 years (!)

    Source: CNN.COM

    Norway killer Anders Breivik ruled sane, given 21-year prison term


    Oslo, Norway (CNN) -- Anders Behring Breivik, the man who killed 77 people in a bomb attack and gun rampage just over a year ago, was judged to be sane by a Norwegian court Friday, as he was sentenced to 21 years in prison.

    Breivik was charged with voluntary homicide and committing acts of terror in the attacks in Oslo and on Utoya Island on July 22, 2011.

    The issue of Breivik's sanity, on which mental health experts have given conflicting opinions, was central to the court's ruling.

    Breivik, who boasts of being an ultranationalist who killed his victims to fight multiculturalism in Norway, wanted to be ruled sane so that his actions wouldn't be dismissed as those of a lunatic.

    He says he acted out of "necessity" to prevent the "Islamization" of his country.

    But prosecutors had asked that Breivik, 33, be acquitted on the grounds of insanity, in which case he would have been held in a secure mental health unit.

    The unanimous verdict was delivered at Oslo district court by a panel of five judges.

    Breivik, dressed in a dark suit and tie, had a slight smile on his face as the decision was given.

    He was sentenced to the maximum possible term of 21 years and was ordered to serve a minimum of 10 years in prison. The time he has already spent in prison counts toward the term.

    The sentence could be extended, potentially indefinitely, in the future if he is considered still to pose a threat to society. Norway does not have the death penalty.

    Bjorn Ihler, a survivor of the Utoya Island attack, told CNN he was glad the trial had concluded and that justice had been done.

    "It's been an amazingly difficult process. It's been a constant, constant reminder of why we have to fight extremism in every way possible," he said of the trial.

    "We have to make sure nothing like this ever happens again."

    The court's judgment that Breivik is sane means that the far-right views he espouses can be confronted in Norway without being dismissed as those of a madman, Ihler said.

    "There are extremist people around, they are not insane, and we have to be able to take a proper debate with them," he said.

    Asked whether the verdict meant closure for him, Ihler said: "This case is going to live strongly with me for the rest of my life probably."

    Reading out the court's ruling, Judge Wenche Elizabeth Arntzen spoke of Breivik's "manifesto," a document published online in which he set out his ultranationalist political views.

    Breivik claimed to belong to a far-right group called the Knights Templar but the court found no evidence of its existence, the judge said.

    He described his actions as a pre-emptive attack in defense of ethnic Norwegian people and culture, the court heard.

    Breivik trained for his attack by working out in the gym, running with a backpack filled with rocks and practicing at a shooting club, the court heard.

    He was under the influence of ephedrine, a stimulant, at the time of the attacks, and the possibility that this contributed to his behavior cannot be ruled out, Judge Arne Lyng said. He used meditation techniques to cut off his emotions, Lyng said.

    In the course of the 10-week trial, which wrapped up in June, the court heard chilling evidence from some of those who survived Breivik's shooting spree on Utoya Island, in which 69 people died -- most of them teenagers attending a Labour Party summer youth camp.

    In his own testimony, given without emotion, Breivik recounted firing more bullets into teenagers who were injured and couldn't escape, killing those who tried to "play dead" and driving others into the sea to drown.

    His fertilizer bomb attack against government buildings in Oslo also killed eight people and injured many more.

    It was only luck that more people were not killed and hurt in the blast, the court heard.

    Breivik blames politicians, and the Labour Party in particular, for promoting multiculturalism in Norway.

    He has been held in a "particularly high security" wing of Ila Prison since his detention immediately after the killings.

    The prison's governor, Knut Bjarkeid, said Wednesday that the institution was ready to hold Breivik securely whether the court ruled him sane or not. "Our job is to protect the community," Bjarkeid said.

    Over the past year, Breivik has had three cells for his use, one for physical exercise and another for reading and writing, as well as a separate outdoor exercise space, he said. Breivik cannot mix with prisoners from other wings, but does have contact with prison staff.

    "As of now, we think there is a need to subject Mr. Behring Breivik to a particularly high security regime," Bjarkeid said.

    The high security regime "puts a heavy strain on an inmate, especially if it lasts for a longer period," he added, so Breivik's continued detention under these conditions will be kept under constant review.

    Defense lawyer Geir Lippestad has previously said it is important to Breivik that people see him as sane so they don't dismiss his views.

    During his trial, Breivik promised that he would not appeal if the court found him criminally responsible for his actions.

    The court had to consider conflicting opinions from medical experts in reaching its verdict.

    An initial team of psychiatrists found Breivik to be paranoid and schizophrenic, following 36 hours of interviews.

    However, a second pair of experts found he was not psychotic at the time of the attacks, does not suffer from a psychiatric condition and is not mentally challenged.

    Their report said there is a "high risk for repeated violent actions."

    Mark Stephens, a partner at law firm Finers Stephens Innocent, told CNN Friday: "The general public will think only a madman can commit these offenses, but in law madness is defined very narrowly. Basically it requires a doctor to come to court and say this person has a definable medical illness -- in this case the prosecution said he was a paranoid schizophrenic, and that can be treated with drugs and behavioral therapy.

    "If, however, he had a personality disorder or was just ... motivated, as in this case, by a misguided political belief that this was the only way to stop the Islamization, as he would have it, of his nation, then in those circumstances he has be found guilty because he understood what he was doing was wrong."

    Breivik's rampage, the worst atrocity on Norwegian soil since World War II, prompted much soul-searching.

    Norwegians reasserted their commitment to multiculturalism and tolerance at a series of mass public tributes held in the immediate aftermath of the massacre.

    And earlier this month, Norway's chief of police stepped down after an independent commission detailed a catalog of police and intelligence failures.

    It concluded that those errors cost police 30 minutes in getting to Utoya, and that dozens of lives might have been saved.

    Speaking last month on the anniversary of the killings, Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg urged Norwegians to "honor the dead by celebrating life," and said Breivik had failed in his attempt to change Norway's values.
    Seriously: you kill 77 people and only get 21 years? Are there Norwegian members on this forum? Why not 77 times the maximum sentence? (I know: it's the law, ugh).
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    He'll be walking the streets when he is 54. I wonder what sentence the relative of one of his victims would be eligible for if they killed him the day he walked out of prison?

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    Elite Member yanna's Avatar
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    Not Norwegian but from what I understand 21 years is the maximum time you can be sentenced in Norway for anything. When this time passes he will be reevaluated and they can choose to keep him locked up if they still consider him to be dangerous.
    Last edited by yanna; August 24th, 2012 at 10:10 AM.
    What if Superman is psychotic and everyone can see that he's Clark Kent but they just play along not to set him off?

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    Elite Member greysfang's Avatar
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    My husband is Norwegian and that's just how the law works there. It seems ridiculous to us, but to him our sentences of 3 life sentences plus 400 years is ridiculous. Don't dismiss the fact that they can continue to hold him after the 21 years if he is deemed still dangerous, and they most certainly will. My husband thinks they will hold him until he's in his 60s at least.
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    Elite Member Kat Scorp's Avatar
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    Sometimes being a civilised country means the uncivilised among you will benefit. But I reckon he'll be Norway's Manson - eligible for parole, but never paroled. Assuming sometime in the next 10 years he doesn't get shanked...


    He was sentenced to the maximum possible term of 21 years and was ordered to serve a minimum of 10 years in prison. The time he has already spent in prison counts toward the term.
    Who was the first person to say, "See that chicken there? I'm gonna eat the next thing that comes outta its bum"?


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    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    I understand it's the law, but just doing the math in my head, that's sentencing of about just over 3 months for each person he murdered with nothing to say of those injured.
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    Elite Member Kittylady's Avatar
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    What the fuck? 21 years with a ten year minimum? I can only hope that they plan on using this part to the full:

    The sentence could be extended, potentially indefinitely, in the future if he is considered still to pose a threat to society.

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    Elite Member HWBL's Avatar
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    Oh, I know it says they can decide to hold him indefinitely. My point, however, is that if 21 years is the maximum sentence they can give it must be for the worst of crimes: murder. So, if he only gets 21 years, once, does that mean it makes no difference how many people you murder during a shooting like this, you can only get one punishment of 21 years? He may have killed all 77 in one day, but - especially in the shooting - he pretty much murdered them one by one, individually. I believe 8 were killed in the bombing, so I could almost understand it better that with one act - the bombing - you kill 1 or more people at once, but it's one single act. With the shooting it were all individual targeting of victims and reloading in between, so multiple acts, multiple individual murders. I was wondering if the Norwegian law could provide for such instances, but apparently it can't/doesn't.
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    Silver Member GawsipRawksz's Avatar
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    Oh, Norway...

    PS: This should knock them off at least the first ten spots on the UN list of places to live.

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    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    After his full sentence they can increase the sentence by 5 years if they deem him still dangerous. So I guess they will keep doing that. I really doubt any government would dare let him out.

    I don't understand why you'd have 21 years as the maximum anyone could get though.

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    How about this (he gets a bedroom, an exercise room, and a study):

    Norway vows 'humane' conditions for mass killer

    By Karl Ritter, Associated Press


    OSLO, Norway – Those expecting Anders Behring Breivik to spend the rest of his days alone in a cramped cell will be disappointed when the far-right fanatic receives his sentence Friday for killing 77 people in a bomb and gun rampage last year.
    • By Hakon Mosvold Larsen, AP


    • Anders Behring Breivik, shown in April, gestures as he arrives at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway.
    By Hakon Mosvold Larsen, AP
    Anders Behring Breivik, shown in April, gestures as he arrives at the courtroom, in Oslo, Norway.

    If declared insane, the confessed killer will be the sole patient of a psychiatric ward that Norway built just for him, with 17 people on staff to treat him.
    If found mentally fit, he will remain isolated, for now, in the high-security prison where he uses three 86-square-foot (8-square-meter) cells: a bed room, an exercise room and a study.
    Officials at Oslo's Ila Prison say the ambition would be to eventually transfer Breivik to a section with other prisoners, who have access to a school that teaches from primary grades through university-level courses, a library, a gym, work in the prison's various shops and other leisure activities.
    It's all about a philosophy of humane prison treatment and rehabilitation that forms the bedrock of the Scandinavian penal system.
    "I like to put it this way: He's a human being. He has human rights. This is about creating a humane prison regime," said Ellen Bjercke, a spokeswoman for Ila (EE-luh) Prison.
    Dealing with an unrepentant killer responsible for Norway's worst massacre since World War II puts the system to, perhaps, its most challenging test yet.
    During his trial, Breivik, 33, coolly described how he set off a car bomb that killed eight people and injured scores in Oslo's government district on July 22 last year. Then he unleashed a shooting rampage that left 69 people dead, mostly teenagers, at the summer camp of the governing Labor Party's youth wing. The youngest victim was 14.
    In testimony that was deeply disturbing to the bereaved, the self-styled anti-Muslim militant said he was acting in defense of Norway by targeting the left-wing political party he accused of betraying the country with liberal immigration policies.
    Since Breivik's guilt is not in question, the key decision for the Oslo district court Friday is whether to declare him insane after two psychiatric teams reached opposite conclusions on his mental health.
    Its ruling will be read in a courtroom custom-built for Breivik's trial at a cost of 40 million kroner ($6.8 million). A glass partition separates Breivik from relatives of victims attending the hearing. Remote-controlled cameras capture the proceedings, and a video feed is distributed to court rooms around Norway, where other relatives can watch it live.
    Prison officials say the special measures for Breivik are justified because he presents a security risk that Norway's prison and justice systems previously didn't have the infrastructure to deal with.
    Some Norwegians disagree.
    "To do that for just one person, when there are other things in Norway that need to be taken care of, like elderly care and roads and such things — the money could have been spent on other things," said Thomas Indreboe, who was removed as a lay judge in the case when it emerged that he had advocated on the Internet for Breivik to be executed. In Europe only Belarus still applies the death penalty, according to Amnesty International.

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    Elite Member Kat Scorp's Avatar
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    Wow. Just, wow.
    Who was the first person to say, "See that chicken there? I'm gonna eat the next thing that comes outta its bum"?


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    Elite Member Sarzy's Avatar
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    That sounds quite nice. I wouldn't mind staying there!
    I don't think prisoners should live a life of luxury but I don't think they should be in solitary in a minute cell for 23 hours a day either. Somewhere in-between.

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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarzy View Post
    That sounds quite nice. I wouldn't mind staying there!
    It sounds almost like Hotel California. Nicely appointed, but you can't leave for at least 21 years....

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    Elite Member yanna's Avatar
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    Some pics of his cell. Well, I bet he'll get really crappy movies to watch on his DVD player, (if it were up to me he'd get only the worst chick flicks) his laptop looks pretty old and can't go online, (I think I'd unistall solitaire too!) and his exercise equipment looks a bit rundown. Also that desk chair... really not comfy.
    What if Superman is psychotic and everyone can see that he's Clark Kent but they just play along not to set him off?

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