Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 45678910 LastLast
Results 106 to 120 of 141
Like Tree2Likes

Thread: Amazon's Kindle

  1. #106
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    42,280

    Default

    I spent the last few days away & took my (non-fire) kindle with me. Well, other than my other (better?) half surreptitiously clicking to turn pages when I'm reading (the cad!), it was fad. Especially on the plane, where there isn't much room.
    Free Charmed.

  2. #107
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    I just got one for my birthday. I'm scared of it!
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  3. #108
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    42,280

    Default

    Noooo McJag!
    Can you believe that I filled mine up? I discovered that it can read PDFs so I have a load of knitting patterns on it...
    Try some free books from Amazon & the Gutenberg project has none-copyright lit for free (Austen, Doyle, etc).
    Free Charmed.

  4. #109
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Novice View Post
    Noooo McJag!
    Can you believe that I filled mine up? I discovered that it can read PDFs so I have a load of knitting patterns on it...
    Try some free books from Amazon & the Gutenberg project has none-copyright lit for free (Austen, Doyle, etc).
    OK, but Novice! I pugged it in like they said. I was going to do the yellow arrow thing, but the screen has blacked out. I am frozen. I unplugged it (still no yellow arrow) and placed it back in its little box. The screen remains black. Did I kill it?
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  5. #110
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    42,280

    Default

    Ooh! Black? Is it a kindle fire? Or an ordinary one?
    If it's an ordinary one, take it back, when mine is black the screen is White (not black).
    If it's a fire I don't know....
    Free Charmed.

  6. #111
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    26,583

    Default

    I thought this was kind of interesting. I had already seen some criticism of the device in terms of privacy. But I didn't know about the balky touch screen, the lack of external volume control, or some of the slowness of browsing. I also hadn't thought about the fact that Amazon sells it for less than it cost to make, counting on making a profit on the back end with all the stuff they sell through Amazon's store.

    As Kindle Fire Faces Critics, Remedies Are Promised

    By DAVID STREITFELD

    Published: December 11, 2011

    The Kindle Fire, Amazon’s heavily promoted tablet, is less than a blazing success with many of its early users. The most disgruntled are packing the device up and firing it back to the retailer.
    A few of their many complaints: there is no external volume control. The off switch is easy to hit by accident. Web pages take a long time to load. There is no privacy on the device; a spouse or child who picks it up will instantly know everything you have been doing. The touch screen is frequently hesitant and sometimes downright balky.
    All the individual grievances — recorded on Amazon’s own Web site — received a measure of confirmation last week when Jakob Nielsen, a usability expert, denounced the Fire, saying it offered “a disappointingly poor” experience. For users whose fingers are not as slender as toothpicks, he warned, the screen could be particularly frustrating to manipulate.
    “I feel the Fire is going to be a failure,” Mr. Nielsen, of the Nielsen Norman Group, a Silicon Valley consulting firm, said in an interview. “I can’t recommend buying it.”
    All this would be enough to send some products directly to the graveyard where the Apple Newton, the Edsel, New Coke and McDonald’s Arch Deluxe languish. But as a range of retailers and tech firms could tell you, it would be foolish to underestimate Amazon.
    Amazon sees the Kindle line of devices as critical for its future as a virtual store, and is willing to lose money on the sale of each one for the sake of market share. Once dominance is achieved, it plans to make money on the movies, books and music that users download directly from Amazon.
    First, however, it needs to make the devices ubiquitous. Promoting them every day to its tens of millions of customers at the cheapest possible price will surely help. If Apple brought the notion of the tablet into the mainstream, Amazon is making it affordable.
    The retailer says the Kindle Fire is the most successful product it has ever introduced, a measure of enthusiasm that reveals nothing; it has not specified how many Fires it has sold, nor how many Kindles it has ever sold. It also says it is building even more Fires to meet the strong demand. But, at the same time, it acknowledges that it is working on improvements.
    “In less than two weeks, we’re rolling out an over-the-air update to Kindle Fire,” said Drew Herdener, a company spokesman.
    There will be improvements in performance and multitouch navigation, and customers will have the option of editing the list of items that show what they have recently been doing. No more will wives wonder why their husbands were looking at a dating site when they said they were playing Angry Birds.
    Amazon declines to say, but soon — probably in the spring — there will be an improved version of the device itself. One more shot is all the retailer will get, Mr. Nielsen said. “If that’s a failure, then the Fire is doomed to the dust pile of history.”
    Despite Amazon’s silence on the matter, analysts have been estimating the company will sell three million to five million Fires this quarter. They are neither raising their estimates nor lowering them.
    Amazon’s devotion to this product line is such that it has stripped down the original Kindle e-reader, reduced its price and begun to sell it through other retailers like Best Buy and Wal-Mart for $79, as well as prominently on its Web site. If Amazon had Apple-like margins, analysts estimate that the basic Kindle might cost $180.
    According to calculations by the research firm IHS iSuppli, the $79 Kindle costs Amazon $84 to make. That sum does not include research and development, shipping or, with a third-party retailer, the wholesale discount. Add these up, and Amazon might be losing as much as $20 on every $79 Kindle sold at, for example, Best Buy.
    For most hardware makers, that would be a recipe for corporate suicide. But once the device is activated in a buyer’s home, the losses stop and the consumption begins.
    “What else are you going to do on this Kindle?” asked Andrew Rassweiler, senior director of tear-down services at iSuppli. “Nothing. It’s a useless device unless you’re planning on putting books, a lot of books, on it.”
    The Fire is trying to do much more than be an e-book reader, a function some say it does not do as well as the original Kindle. Slightly more than a third of the 4,500 reviewers of the Fire on Amazon have given it mixed to negative reviews, three stars or fewer. Of Amazon reviewers of the iPad 2, 22 percent have given three stars or fewer; for the original Kindle, that number is 11 percent. (There are a few caveats. At least some of the iPad reviewers bought not from Apple but from resellers, the real target of their ire. As for the original Kindle, after four years it has both a huge number of reviews — over 34,000 — and the advantage of being a known quantity.)
    Many of the initial customers of the Fire seem to have bought it on a mixture of faith and hype. The striking thing even about some of the one-star reviewers is that they are regretful rather than angry. One review, couched as an open letter to Amazon’s chief executive, Jeff Bezos, began: “I have spent thousands on your outstanding site. I own and love the original Kindle. When asked about why I would buy a Fire when I had an iPad, I said that half of me wanted to just support your effort and that I believed Amazon just did things right.” The reviewer is now recommending that friends skip lunch to buy an iPad.
    Gene Munster, an analyst with Piper Jaffray, has been tracking the opinions as more reviews are posted on Amazon. Since Nov. 18, five-star reviews have fallen slightly, to 47 percent from 50 percent, he says. One-star reviews have held relatively steady at about 13 percent.
    “I would have expected things to be even worse at this point,” Mr. Munster said, adding that initial buyers were usually the most critical. Pricing will save the Fire, he predicted. At $199 versus $500 for an iPad, “Amazon has a lot of air cover to have a B-level product.”
    Mr. Nielsen, the consultant, disagreed.
    The 7-inch Fire does a good job displaying sites optimized for smaller mobile devices, he said, but stumbles when it tries to show pages designed for 10-inch tablets. “Like squeezing a Size 10 person into a Size 7 suit,” Mr. Nielsen wrote in his report. “Not going to look good.” As for displaying desktop sites, forget it.
    It is true that the device is only $199, but so what? “Look at your hand. Is it thin or fat?” he asked. “If it’s fat, you just know it’s going to be bad.”
    The device does do one thing well, he said. Shopping on Amazon is a breeze. “If I were given to conspiracy theories, I’d say that Amazon deliberately designed a poor Web browsing user experience to keep Fire users from shopping on competing sites,” Mr. Nielsen said.

  7. #112
    Elite Member NVash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,473

    Default

    I have yet to hear one good thing about the Fire. When it first came out I was furious because I had recently gotten a Kindle 3 but, as we know, thats how technology works. You buy something after many years of waiting and they update it a few months later. From what Ive read its not good as a book reader which, to me, makes it useless. The apps are a bonus but if Im buying a Kindle I want an ebook reader. The fact that it only does WiFi is a killer for me as well. One of the selling points for me on the Kindle was the free 3G because we dont have reliable internet where I live and you cant just latch onto every WiFi connection. I have all sorts of problems with my game systems for instance so Id rather not be bothered. The security problem isnt that serious to me but the others are.

    That said Im glad I stayed away from the Kindle Fire. Hopefully the Fire 2 does better because we all know its coming.

  8. #113
    Elite Member McJag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    42,527

    Default

    I still am skeered of mine. It just sits there blank. I decided to wait until after Christmas when my BIL comes. He is an engineer and figures out everything.
    I didn't start out to collect diamonds, but somehow they just kept piling up.-Mae West

  9. #114
    Elite Member JadeStar70's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    BFE, Iowa
    Posts
    7,566

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NVash View Post
    I have yet to hear one good thing about the Fire. When it first came out I was furious because I had recently gotten a Kindle 3 but, as we know, thats how technology works. You buy something after many years of waiting and they update it a few months later. From what Ive read its not good as a book reader which, to me, makes it useless. The apps are a bonus but if Im buying a Kindle I want an ebook reader. The fact that it only does WiFi is a killer for me as well. One of the selling points for me on the Kindle was the free 3G because we dont have reliable internet where I live and you cant just latch onto every WiFi connection. I have all sorts of problems with my game systems for instance so Id rather not be bothered. The security problem isnt that serious to me but the others are.

    That said Im glad I stayed away from the Kindle Fire. Hopefully the Fire 2 does better because we all know its coming.

    That is what I am thinking, too. I will wait for the Fire 2 that hopefully has 3G access and a additional storage option.

  10. #115
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    26,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JadeStar70 View Post
    That is what I am thinking, too. I will wait for the Fire 2 that hopefully has 3G access and a additional storage option.
    Speaking of additional storage, I am still amazed that the Kindle Fire didn't include a micro SD storage option. People were critical of the Nook Tablet for not allowing people to store more than 1 GB of personal files on the 16 GB on-board memory. However, you can go out right now and buy a 16 GB micro SD card for $15. So, it's literally a non-issue. And you can always swap extra or larger cards in to basically increase the memory or diversity of your library. You cannot do that with either the Fire or the IPAD. The IPAD charges you an extra $100 (instead of $15) to increase your storage capacity by 16 GB. What a racket.

  11. #116
    Elite Member NVash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,473

    Default

    I expect that with the iPad. Its no different for the iPhone or the iPods. Kindle, however, has no excuse. Everything that Apple did wrong they should have done right. Otherwise whats the point?

  12. #117
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    26,583

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NVash View Post
    I expect that with the iPad. Its no different for the iPhone or the iPods. Kindle, however, has no excuse. Everything that Apple did wrong they should have done right. Otherwise whats the point?
    In my opinion, the reason that Amazon left removable storage out of the Kindle is more insidious. I think they did it because it would obligate you to be more dependent on Amazon for movie content. Right now, with my Nook, I can swap micro SD cards out at will and play different movies that have been converted to MP4 format. You can't do that with Kindle.

  13. #118
    Elite Member NVash's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    5,473

    Default

    ^ That was another complaint. Even if you find a way to get videos on there they wont play unless theyre tied into Amazon. IIRC I read that in a review, man got home movies on it but they wouldnt play. Thats just ridiculous. Even Apple doesnt play that dirty.

  14. #119
    Elite Member JadeStar70's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    BFE, Iowa
    Posts
    7,566

    Default

    Well, bummer!! I guess I will have to wait a little longer to find the right device for me.

  15. #120
    Elite Member Novice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Beyond Caring, then hang a left.
    Posts
    42,280

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by McJag View Post
    I still am skeered of mine. It just sits there blank. I decided to wait until after Christmas when my BIL comes. He is an engineer and figures out everything.
    Honey, first of all turn it on!!!
    Plug it in & charge it up. There is a help guide on the kindle.
    If you want to read the guide first go here ... Amazon.com Help: Kindle Support

    For a video demo go here:- http://www.amazon.com/gp/mpd/permalink/mQOQX2V7KT9ZY

    And once you get used to it, you can even borrow library books on it
    Amazon.com Help: Public Library Books for Kindle
    Free Charmed.

Page 8 of 10 FirstFirst ... 45678910 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •