Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 23
Like Tree16Likes

Thread: Ashley Madison member speaks out after hack

  1. #1
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    4,879

    Default Ashley Madison member speaks out after hack

    Ashley Madison member speaks out after hack

    Ashley Madison member speaks out after hack

    Nine News
    Alex Nicholson 6 days ago

    A Queensland man who signed up to Ashley Madison says "his stomach turned over" when he heard the website aimed at cheating spouses had been hacked.

    Over the weekend hackers going by the pseudonym 'Impact Team' breached Ashley Madisonís security and gained access to the personal details of a worldwide membership of nearly 40 million people.

    The hackers are threatening to expose the identities, credit card details, naked photos and sexual fantasies of members, the BBC reports.

    The 53-year-old Brisbane man, who did not want to be identified, told ninemsn he was "just a lonely soul" when he signed up to the site.

    He said that, unlike many of Ashley Madisonís customers, he was not looking for an affair but for companionship after getting a divorce.

    "When I heard about the hack my stomach turned over," he said.

    "I just thought, 'oh sót, what am I going to do?' I didnít know who to ask to get advice. There is no knowing what to do.

    "I feel sick thinking about my ex-wife and kids finding out."

    Users in more than 46 countries subscribe to Ashley Madison, which was founded in 2001 and uses the slogan, 'Life is short. Have an affair'.

    While the precise number of those affected is unclear, it is estimated up to one million Australians are subscribed to the website.

    The man said Ashley Madison was not the first online dating website he had tried but would be his last.

    "I've paid a lot of money to sites in the past, some from the Philippines, but never met anyone," he said.

    "I'm definitely put off now. I wish I didn't know about them."

  2. #2
    Elite Member Kathie_Moffett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    just another freak in the freak kingdom
    Posts
    6,956

    Default

    Data's been released. Ouch. You think divorce lawyers are behind this?

    Note that many .gov email addresses are apparently in the data dump...

    Hackers Finally Post Stolen Ashley Madison Data | WIRED

    Hackers who stole sensitive customer information from the cheating site AshleyMadison.com appear to have made good on their threat to post the data online.
    A data dump, 9.7 gigabytes in size, was posted on Tuesday to the dark web using an Onion address accessible only through the Tor browser. The files appear to include account details and log-ins for some 32 million users of the social networking site, touted as the premier site for married individuals seeking partners for affairs. Seven years worth of credit card and other payment transaction details are also part of the dump, going back to 2007. The data, which amounts to millions of payment transactions, includes names, street address, email address and amount paid. AshleyMadison.com claimed to have nearly 40 million users at the time of the breach about a month ago, all apparently in the market for clandestine hookups.
    “Ashley Madison is the most famous name in infidelity and married dating,” the site asserts on its homepage. “Have an Affair today on Ashley Madison. Thousands of cheating wives and cheating husbands signup everyday looking for an affair…. With Our affair guarantee package we guarantee you will find the perfect affair partner.”
    The data released by the hackers includes names, addresses and phone numbers submitted by users of the site, though it’s unclear if members provided legitimate details. A sampling of the data indicates that users likely provided random numbers and addresses, but files containing credit card transactions will yield real names and addresses, unless members of the site used anonymous pre-paid cards. One analysis of email addresses found in the data dump also shows that some 15,000 are .mil. or .gov addresses.
    The data also includes descriptions of what members were seeking. “I’m looking for someone who isn’t happy at home or just bored and looking for some excitement,” wrote one member who provided an address in Ottawa and the name and phone number of someone who works for the Customs and Immigration Union in Canada. “I love it when I’m called and told I have 15 minutes to get to someplace where I’ll be greeted at the door with a surprise—maybe lingerie, nakedness. I like to ravish and be ravished … I like lots of foreplay and stamina, fun, discretion, oral, even willingness to experiment—*smile*”
    Passwords released in the data dump appear to have been hashed using the bcrypt algorithm for PHP, but Robert Graham, CEO of Erratasec, says that despite this being one of the most secure ways to store passwords, “hackers are still likely to be able to ‘crack’ many of these hashes in order to discover the account holder’s original password.” If the accounts are still online, this means hackers will be able to grab any private correspondence associated with the account.
    It’s notable, however, that the cheating site, in using the secure hashing algorithm, surpassed many other victims of breaches we’ve seen over the years who never bothered to encrypt customer passwords.
    “We’re so used to seeing cleartext and MD5 hashes,” Graham says. “It’s refreshing to see bcrypt actually being used.”
    Here’s how the hackers introduced the new data dump:
    Following the intrusion last month, the hackers, who called themselves the Impact Team, demanded that Avid Life Media, owner of AshleyMadison.com and its companion site Established Men, take down the two sites. EstablishedMen.com promises to connect beautiful young women with rich sugar daddies “to fulfill their lifestyle needs.” The hackers didn’t target CougarLife, a sister site run by ALM that promises to connect older women with younger men.
    “Avid Life Media has been instructed to take Ashley Madison and Established Men offline permanently in all forms, or we will release all customer records, including profiles with all the customers’ secret sexual fantasies and matching credit card transactions, real names and addresses, and employee documents and emails,” the hackers wrote in a statement following the breach.
    To show they meant business, they posted sample files containing some of the stolen data, which included company financial information detailing employee salaries and documents mapping the company’s internal network.
    The hackers appeared to target AshleyMadison and EstablishedMen over the questionable morals they condoned and encouraged, but they also took issue with what they considered ALM’s fraudulent business practices. Despite promising customers to delete their user data from the site for a $19 fee, the company actually retained the data on ALM’s servers, the hackers claimed. “Too bad for those men, they’re cheating dirtbags and deserve no such discretion,” the hackers wrote. “Too bad for ALM, you promised secrecy but didn’t deliver.”
    Avid Life Media defiantly ignored the warnings and kept both sites online after the breach, promising customers that it had increased the security of its networks.
    That wouldn’t matter for the customers whose data had already been taken. Any increased security would be too little too late for them. Now they face the greatest fallout from the breach: public embarrassment, the wrath of angry partners who may have been victims of their cheating, possible blackmail and potential fraud from anyone who may now use the personal data and bank card information exposed in the data dump.
    Click to Open Overlay Gallery courtesy of Robert Graham “Avid Life Media has failed to take down Ashley Madison and Established Men,” Impact Team wrote in a statement accompanying the online dump Tuesday. “We have explained the fraud, deceit, and stupidity of ALM and their members. Now everyone gets to see their data…. Keep in mind the site is a scam with thousands of fake female profiles. See ashley madison fake profile lawsuit; 90-95% of actual users are male. Chances are your man signed up on the world’s biggest affair site, but never had one. He just tried to. If that distinction matters.”
    The hackers deflected responsibility for any damages or repercussions that victims of the breach and data dump may suffer.
    “Find yourself in here? It was ALM that failed you and lied to you. Prosecute them and claim damages. Then move on with your life. Learn your lesson and make amends. Embarrassing now, but you’ll get over it,” they wrote.
    It’s important to note that Ashley Madison’s sign-up process does not require verification of an email address to set up an account, so legitimate addresses might have been hijacked and used by some members of the site. One email in the data dump, for example, appears to belong to former UK Prime Minister (Tony Blair).
    Avid Life Media condemned the release of the data.
    “This event is not an act of hacktivism, it is an act of criminality. It is an illegal action against the individual members of AshleyMadison.com, as well as any freethinking people who choose to engage in fully lawful online activities,” the company said in a statement. “The criminal, or criminals, involved in this act have appointed themselves as the moral judge, juror, and executioner, seeing fit to impose a personal notion of virtue on all of society. We will not sit idly by and allow these thieves to force their personal ideology on citizens around the world.”
    This story was updated as it developed.
    Did you know that every time a parent gives in to their kid's whines and buys them candy at the checkout lane, a kitten gets diabetes?-Dlisted
    I dislike groups of people, but I love individuals. Every person you look at, you can see the universe in their eyes, if you're really looking.
    -George Carlin

  3. #3
    Elite Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    On Howard Stern's Sybian
    Posts
    2,837

    Default

    I can't help but laugh a little thinking about all those assholes sweating through their suits, praying their wives don't uncover their Ashley Madison login info.
    "You'll have to speak up, I'm wearing a towel."

  4. #4
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Here's a URL where you can type an email address into and find out if it was associated with the hacked profiles:

    https://ashley.cynic.al/

  5. #5
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,300

    Default

    That's assuming these sleazoids are dumb enough to use their work or usual private email addy...no wait...
    twitchy2.0 and Clubber Lang like this.
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  6. #6
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    That's assuming these sleazoids are dumb enough to use their work or usual private email addy...no wait...
    I'm in a FaceBook group where someone dumped all the information pertaining to a particular county in one nice convenient page. One person found one of their kids' teachers, as well as a neighbor.

  7. #7
    Elite Member msdeb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    in a van down by the river
    Posts
    39,431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MohandasKGanja View Post
    Here's a URL where you can type an email address into and find out if it was associated with the hacked profiles:

    https://ashley.cynic.al/
    i typed mine in, and even though i'm not a member, i'll admit i was wondering if my name would show up. But it didnt.
    Basic rule of Gossip Rocks: Don't be a dick.Tati
    Lighten Up Francis WCG

  8. #8
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by msdeb View Post
    i typed mine in, and even though i'm not a member, i'll admit i was wondering if my name would show up. But it didnt.
    At least you know you don't have multiple personality disorder.
    kasippu and Kathie_Moffett like this.

  9. #9
    Elite Member dougie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Legitimizing LeAnn Rimes' Murderous Trip to the Top
    Posts
    5,559

    Default

    Ashley Madison memes flood the internet after hack leaks user info | Daily Mail Online

    Sweating husbands and beaming divorce lawyers: Hilarious Ashley Madison memes flood the internet after cheats' details are released online

    • Internet users not caught up in the scandal try to see the funny side
    • People are poking fun at turmoil Ashley Madison hack has caused users

    By Martin Robinson for MailOnline
    Published: 11:58 GMT, 20 August 2015 | Updated: 19:46 GMT, 20 August 2015

    The Ashley Madison hack could wreck millions of marriages, but as usual internet users not caught up in the scandal can still see the funny side.

    The names, ages, addresses, phone numbers, credit card details and sexual fantasies of up to 37million users including 1.2million in the UK were revealed by hackers yesterday.

    Twitter has been flooded with memes poking fun at sweating husbands fearing they will be caught and gleeful divorce lawyers who may make money from their infidelity.

    As a result others suggested that Ashley Madison should change its motto from 'Life is short. Have an affair' to 'life is short. Hire an attorney'.

    Here are the best of the online memes:




    Tongue in cheek: This viral adapts an Ashley Madison advert to reflect the fact that millions of anonymous users are no longer able to keep their membership a secret



    Under pressure: Many members outed yesterday have admitted they are frightened their wives will now find out they were members


    Only winners: One Twitter user designed this graphic to suggest that divorce lawyers will be the only happy people connected to the data leak


    Scorned: Using this image from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Orlando Jones says anyone who has been betrayed is likely to look like Jones' nemesis Kali Ma


    Play on words: One wag suggested the cheating site should change its motto from 'Life is short. Have an affair' to 'Life is short. Hire an attorney'


    Poking fun: Using one of the sign in screens from Ashley Madison, one person jokes about the site's security after the breach





    Cashing in: This fellow infidelity site attempts to promise its users that their secret is safe with them


    Movie: Simpleton Brick Tamland from Anchorman, played by Steve Carell, has his say on the matter


    Heart of the matter: Morpheus in The Matrix, played by Laurence Fishburne, is used by one person to suggest why members joined Madison in the first place


    Love rat: Austin Powers, played by Mike Myers, was known as a ladies man and this meme suggests he would act faux outraged if he had been outed




    Ashley Madison memes flood the internet after hack leaks user info | Daily Mail Online

  10. #10
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    24,817

    Default

    gas_chick likes this.

  11. #11
    A*O
    A*O is offline
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! A*O's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Being Paula
    Posts
    30,300

    Default

    Long but excellent article by John Heyward at Breitbart (yeah, yeah, I know. Still a good article IMO)

    The personal fallout from the disclosure of a client list stolen from the Ashley Madison website for adulterers will involve embarrassment, career destruction, and wrecked marriages.

    What does it all mean in context? What does it say about society that a website dedicated to helping people cheat on their spouses racked up over 30 million clients?

    Obviously it’s an example of dishonesty and infidelity on a breathtaking scale. For all the swinging “progressive” talk about how Ashley Madison could be seen as a positive force, or even an instrument for improving the quality of marriage by helping us get over our sexual hangups – much of that talk emanating from the purveyors of the site, of course – what actually happened when that client list leaked out? Shame. Deep, deep waves of shame, rolling across the globe.

    The mostly male clients of the site ran for the hills, crawled under rocks, contacted their lawyers, and tried to hire digital hit men to zap the database. If we’re feeling charitable, we can take this as a good sign. Progressivism has not erased every shred of common sense and morality just yet.

    The success of Ashley Madison involved a great deal of dishonesty, and not just the primal dishonesty of using a website to cheat on spouses. One of the primary points made by the Impact Team hackers who stole this data is that Ashley Madison was a ripoff operation – it lied about the paid service that would supposedly erase all traces of departing clients, and it lied about how many women were involved in this sexual free-fall. Strip away all the phone accounts, and the clientele revealed by this data dump is 95 percent male. These men were paying a lot of money to roam upon hunting grounds that provided them with very little game.

    The Washington Post noticed another grimly amusing example of dishonesty: a great many of the users lied about how old they were. “There are over 36 million different birthdates registered with the site. And, if everyone is telling the truth, one out of every 12 Ashley Madison members was born on New Year’s Day,” the Post notes wryly.

    January 1st was the default birthdate for new profiles, as is the case on many websites, so many users evidently only troubled themselves to change the year. A sizable portion of the users who did bother to change the month and date either allowed it to default to the first day of the chosen month, or made lazy use of keyboard shortcuts to choose the same number for month and day, like 2/2, 3/3, or 4/4. Quite a few jokers decided to enter Valentine’s Day as their birthdays. And, unsurprisingly, they don’t seem to have been scrupulous about entering the correct year and divulging their correct ages.

    Jennifer Weiner at the New York Times picks up on another critique made by the hackers: the people who used Ashley Madison were, in the main, nitwits. A much-cited statistic about the AM database is that some 15,000 of the email addresses were government or military. That doesn’t mean 15,000 of the users worked for the government. It means 15,000 of them – minus a probably considerable number of fakes – were foolish enough to provide their .gov or .mil address when signing up for an adultery website.

    The actual number of government employees counted among the ranks of Ashley Madison users is probably much higher. The smarter clients didn’t use email addresses that revealed exactly which state or federal agency they worked for. It’s not exactly difficult to create a free, discreet, disposable email address for yourself in the Two Thousand Teens. Ashley Madison wasn’t validating these email addresses in any way.

    There are also some goofy details emerging from the payment data, such as customers making highly unwise choices of billing address and payment method. The UK Register notes that many of them used their work addresses. Some of them are police officers. Many of the users created their profiles with applications that fed the precise GPS coordinates of their location into the system.

    The very notion of using a paid website to find infidelity playmates is arguably as stupid as it is dishonest, especially when it appears quite a few wealthy men with a lot to lose were among the paying customers. The sales pitch for this thing was incredibly successful, given that the actual amount of adultery taking place among a 95 percent male user base was probably rather modest. Some of the clients probably did more diligence before buying a $50 videogame or ordering a pizza.

    One other notable conclusion to draw from the Ashley Madison hack is a worrying one that goes far beyond the moral issue at hand. This was a theft of data, after all – an invasion of privacy that could be replicated for other reasons against far less reprehensible victims. Avid Life Media, the owner of Ashley Madison, uses their every public statement to emphasize that they were the victims of a crime, and neither they nor their clients sacrificed their property rights without due process by participating in this unsavory online transaction.

    Gizmodo spells it out: “Look beyond your own feelings about the morality of the site that was hacked. The implications of this mass revelation should horrify everyone, regardless of how you feel about Ashley Madison. You submit information online under the illusion that no one is ever going to see it—even if you know better. For the most part you’ll be safe, but as we increasingly entrust more and more of our private selves to inherently fallible digital service providers, devastating leaks like The Fappening [hackers releasing nude photos of celebrities] and the Ashley Madison breach are going to happen more and more.”

    When that burst of celebrity nude photos hit the Net, many responded by essentially saying celebrities don’t have any real expectation of privacy (an idea floated since the earliest days of camera-wielding paparazzi, and obviously not accepted by celebrities themselves.) Some went further and suggested anyone who uploads nude pictures or other sensitive material to the Cloud is basically asking for it, and should not be surprised if their private information is eventually made public by hackers. Politically-active “hacktivists” seem firmly convinced that people they have judged guilty of various legal or social offenses have no privacy rights that command respect.

    Is the Ashley Madison hack not a perfect example of that principle? How many people, upon hearing this story, snorted that clients of an adultery website deserve whatever misfortune comes their way? Vigilante impulses are easy to indulge when the targets don’t seem worthy of respect. Everybody seems unworthy of respect to someone. There aren’t any rules, so there’s no telling where all of this will end. Maybe people will be frightened right off the Internet, and return to secure paper correspondence… or maybe the generation to come will simply grow accustomed to very different notions of privacy and discretion.
    misrule likes this.
    I've never liked lesbianism - it leaves a bad taste in my mouth
    Dame Edna Everage

    Just because you're offended doesn't mean you're right.

  12. #12
    fgg
    fgg is offline
    Elite Member fgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    29,635

    Default

    a few *celebs* being outed as ashley madison members:

    RHONY Kristen's husband Josh Taekman Admits He Has Ashley Madison Account, Apologizes for "Foolishly" Signing Up

    Read more: Josh Taekman Apologizes for "Foolishly" Signing Up for Ashley Madison - Us Weekly

    Snooki's Husband Jionni LaValle Allegedly Linked to Ashley Madison Account

    Read more: Snooki's Husband Jionni LaValle Allegedly Linked to Ashley Madison - Us Weekly
    can't post pics because my computer's broken and i'm stupid

  13. #13
    fgg
    fgg is offline
    Elite Member fgg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    29,635

    Default

    Ashley Madison Leak Tied to Two Possible Suicides; Company Offers $374,000 for Hacker Intel

    Two people who had Ashley Madison accounts may have committed suicide in the days since hackers released stolen subscriber data on Aug. 18, according to the Toronto Police Department. During a press conference on Monday, Aug. 24, Toronto police superintendent Bryce Evans announced that Ashley Madison’s parent company, Avid Life Media, is offering a $374,491 reward to anyone providing information that could help lead to the arrest of the hackers known as the “Impact Team.”

    Captain Michael Gorhum, who served 25 years with the San Antonio Police Department in Texas, took his own life days after his email and account information were leaked.
    The team of hackers released over 37 million email addresses and credit card numbers associated with the Canada-based website that helps married men and women arrange affairs.

    “Your actions are illegal and will not be tolerated,” Evans said of the hackers during the press conference. “This is your wake-up call.”
    On top of the possible suicides connected to the leak, the release of the stolen data also led disgraced 19 Kids and Counting alum Josh Duggar to confess that he had been unfaithful to his wife, and Louisiana GOP executive director Jason Dorť to claim he used the site as research on his political opponents.

    Read more: Ashley Madison Leak Tied to Two Possible Suicides - Us Weekly
    can't post pics because my computer's broken and i'm stupid

  14. #14
    Super Moderator twitchy2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Milliways
    Posts
    53,844

    Default

    How is that the fault of the hackers?
    He said that, unlike many of Ashley Madison’s customers, he was not looking for an affair but for companionship after getting a divorce.
    Uh huh. "After" getting a divorce. Riiight
    *DIVA! likes this.

    "The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge."

    -- Stephen Hawking

  15. #15
    Elite Member pinkbunnyslippers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    99 miles from NYC
    Posts
    4,147

    Default

    Of course they were looking for an affair. The word affair is in their slogan.

    Edit: Oops, I misunderstood. Anyway, him to even plan companionship (while being married) after the divorce is wrong. If he is looking to be with someone, then he should just go on a regular dating website after the divorce was final. No one is stupid to believe that.
    "Fashion is an art, but individuality is the key"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Simple rice-cooking hack could reduce calories by 60 per cent
    By twitchy2.0 in forum Food and Cuisine
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: April 8th, 2015, 04:50 PM
  2. Making mudroom storage from an IKEA hack
    By Novice in forum Home and Garden
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: August 10th, 2012, 10:39 PM
  3. Replies: 116
    Last Post: April 24th, 2011, 01:01 PM
  4. Replies: 15
    Last Post: December 4th, 2008, 10:41 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •