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Thread: If you have a 3D printer, you have a shoe, a purse, a guitar, and a Tom Hanks mask!

  1. #1
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    Default If you have a 3D printer, you have a shoe, a purse, a guitar, and a Tom Hanks mask!

    Just think, one day, we'll be able to ask each other, "Hey, have you printed the new Manolo Blahnik shoe yet?"

    9 Incredible Objects That Prove 3D Printers Are Totally Worth it

    9 Incredible Objects That Prove 3D Printers Are Totally Worth it

    Leslie Horn

    If you've got a 3D printer and a little bit of imagination, you can make pretty much anything. While these machines are still too expensive to be completely ubiquitous, early adopters are making some really amazing things. We got a look at a few of these objects at the 3D Printing Expo in New York this week. Here are the most unbelievable items we saw.

    3D System's adorable 3D printer—the Cubify—would fit right in with other home appliances. From a design standpoint, it looks just like a little sewing machine. And the company is using its machines (not just Cubify) to create some pretty neat stuff, like this platform shoe.




    And this purse.




    Or this chain-like belt.




    It's not exactly a Fender, but the 3D-printed guitar we saw at the 3D systems booth was awesome. Bonus points for the patriotic design.




    There are certainly a lot of random, useless 3D-printed tchotchkes. But the wine opener we saw at 3D Systems' booth is something you actually need!




    Form Labs showed off an incredible chess set. The Rook you see is so very detailed, it even has a spiral staircase inside.




    To see the detail on other objects from Form Labs, we looked at them under a magnifying glass.




    Doesn't this vase look like it was formed on a pottery wheel? Nope. It was printed on Sculpteo.




    These creepy 3D-printed busts—including one of Tom Hanks—were churned out by an MCor machine, which prints using paper.




    This 3D printed bangle is something you could actually see someone wearing, not just as a novelty. For a long time, 3D-printed items *screamed* 3D-printed. But as the technology improves, design quality is improving along with it.



    Photos by Nick Stango

  2. #2
    fgg
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    i just saw a 3D printer video today and the things that can be made are absolutely outstanding!
    MohandasKGanja likes this.
    can't post pics because my computer's broken and i'm stupid

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    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    These things are amazing. I can't wait to see what the future holds with this technology.
    "Schadenfreude, hard to spell, easy to feel." ~VenusinFauxFurs

    "Scoffing is one of my main hobbies!" ~Trixie

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    Elite Member palta's Avatar
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    Crap, I will have to show this to my bf. He says 3D printers are a great idea, but I'm close minded and think is silly to replace mass production.

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    Elite Member Chilly Willy's Avatar
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    I thought it only uses paper/ plastic. How can it build a guitar? Amazing. The shoes just gave me a billion fashion ideas. This thing is fucking gold.
    Hello mother fucker! when you ask a question read also the answer instead of asking another question on an answer who already contain the answer of your next question!
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    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
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    This guy, who used to work for Apple, is using 3D scanning and printing to give amputees more realistic prosthetic limbs:

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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    Maybe it'll have the ability to spit out a really nice human being to be in a relationship with.
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    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
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    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    The 7 Weirdest Things Made By 3D Printing

    By Stephanie Pappas, LiveScience Senior Writer | LiveScience.com – 2 hrs 3 mins ago









    Related Content



    • View PhotoA Japanese clinic offers a 3D model …




    The cost of 3D printing has long kept the technology in a select few hands, but all that is changing as 3D printing blossoms into a full-fledged trend.
    This June, Staples will start retailing a consumer 3D printer, the Cube 3D Printer, for $1,299 — not cheap, but not out of reach of the dedicated techie, either. Proponents hope that as costs come down, more sophisticated printers will reach the general public, allowing for digital DIY manufacturing.
    Though copyright and quality issues remain a concern, 3D printing has already made its mark in some pretty weird ways. Read on for seven strange objects created by 3D printers.
    1. A working gun
    It looks more like a toy than a deadly weapon, but the world's first 3D-printed gun has gun control advocates as well as pro-gun rights enthusiasts concerned and excited. Last year, Cody Wilson, a radical libertarian/anarchist from the University of Texas' law school, announced plans for printing a gun, establishing a nonprofit called Defense Distributed to fabricate the weapon and distribute the plans.
    In early March, Wilson and his team achieved their dream, successfully testing the "Liberator" on a Texas firing range. Except for a firing pin made from a metal nail, the gun is made from plastic pieces printed on an $8,000 Stratasys Dimension SST 3D printer. The gun successfully shot a .380 caliber bullet, but exploded when its creators tried to modify it to shoot a larger 5.7x28 rifle cartridge.
    2. A make-it-yourself violin
    The world's first 3D-printed violin is half technological wonder, half papier-mâché project. DIY violin-maker Alex Davies used 3D printing to make a plastic form for the violin's body, which he and his team then covered in newspaper and glue. A piece of cardboard made the neck and some picture-hanging wire served for strings. The result, announced online Feb. 27 via a somewhat-difficult-to-listen-to YouTube video, was no Stradivarius, but its creators declared it "not bad for a weekend and 12 dollars."
    3. A dead king's face
    After discovering the skeleton of long-lost King Richard III under a parking lot in Leicester, England, archaeologists turned over the skull measurements to facial reconstruction expert Caroline Wilkinson of the University of Dundee. Wilkinson and her colleagues sculpted computerized flesh to computerized bone and then 3D printed the resulting bust — a lifelike look at a man dead more than 500 years.
    4. Human stem cells
    Don't expect to see this in Staples anytime soon, but scientists have developed a 3D printer for stem cells. [7 Cool Medical Uses for 3D Printing]
    The device works by creating uniform droplets of living embryonic stem cells, which are the cells present in early development that are capable of differentiating into any type of tissue. The printer is so gentle that it can squirt out as few as five cells at a time without damaging them. Researchers can use the dabs of cells to rapidly test drugs or to build miniature scraps of tissue. The eventual goal is to grow whole organs from scratch.
    5. Most of a skull
    3D-printed organs may be a dream for the future, but scientists can already build some body parts. In March, surgeons replaced 75 percent of a man's skull with a plastic one made by 3D printing.
    Replacing damaged or diseased bone is not new, but the OsteoFab implant is the first to be custom manufactured via 3D printing — an advance that helps bring down the cost. Oxford Performance Materials, the company that created the implant, plans to work on other biocompatible implants for the rest of the body.
    6. A bionic ear
    Did you hear that? Probably, if you're wearing a 3D-printed ear created by Princeton University researchers. The bionic ear, made from calf cells, a polymer gel and silver nanoparticles, can pick up radio signals beyond the range of human hearing.
    To make the ear, the researchers printed the gel into an approximate ear shape and cultured the calf cells on that matrix to create something appropriately biological. An infusion of silver nanoparticles creates an "antenna" for picking up those radio signals, which could then be transferred to the cochlea, the part of the ear that translates sound into brain signals. However, the researchers have no plans to stick the ear to a human head. Yet.
    7. Your very own fetus
    Can't wait to see what your baby will look like? Japanese company Fasotec has you covered. The engineering firm can take magnetic resonance images (MRI) of a developing fetus in the womb and convert them into a 3D-printed paperweight of your fetus in white plastic, surrounded by a clear plastic tummy.
    Fasotec's main gig is creating 3D prints of scanned organs for doctors and medical students, so fetus keepsakes are something of a promotional sideline. Japanese moms can get theirs for about 100,000 yen (approximately $975), not including the cost of the MRI.
    Follow Stephanie Pappas on Twitter and Google+. Follow us @livescience, Facebook & Google+. Original article on LiveScience.com.


    Copyright 2013 LiveScience, a TechMediaNetwork company. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    The 7 Weirdest Things Made By 3D Printing
    "Schadenfreude, hard to spell, easy to feel." ~VenusinFauxFurs

    "Scoffing is one of my main hobbies!" ~Trixie

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    Bronze Member spiffiness's Avatar
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    That chess set with the little staircase Amazing.

    And a 3D printed fetus? Sh!t is the stuff of sci-fi movies.

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    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
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    And this: UM Doctors use 3D printer to create airway implant for baby
    University of Michigan researchers have used a 3D printer to create a custom-made, life-saving implant for a baby boy, they reported today in a letter in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    The baby, Kaiba Gionfriddo, had a rare disorder in which one of the airways in his lungs collapsed when he exhaled. The problem caused him to stop breathing and turn blue when he was 6 weeks old. Even with a mechanical ventilator, Kaiba stopped breathing virtually every day, requiring doctors to perform emergency resuscitations.

    “We’d recently had a child in the hospital who died of this, and I said, ‘There has got to be a solution that we can find for these kids,’ ” said coauthor Glenn Green, Kaiba’s doctor and an associate professor of otolaryngology.

    So Green and his U-M colleagues tried something new.

    Using a 3D printer, they custom-built a tiny, flexible splint that will grow with Kaiba. Researchers used a special material designed to be absorbed by Kaiba’s body in about three years, said coauthor Scott Hollister, a professor of biomedical and mechanical engineering.

    Instead of making a cast of Kaiba’s airway with plaster, they used a CT scanner, which gave them a 3D blueprint.

    Like a vacuum-cleaner hose, the C-shaped splint is flexible enough to move when Kaiba breathes. But it’s also firm enough to prevent his air tube from flopping shut, Green said.

    Kaiba was able to come off the ventilator three weeks after his surgery in February 2012. “Our prediction is that this will be a cure for him,” Green said. “The splint will go away, and the process will be done.”

    The porous splint is made from the same material as dissolvable stitches, Green said. Just as a wisteria vine grows through a trellis, Kaiba’s body will create new cells to permeate the scaffold. By the time the splint is completely absorbed, doctors hope that Kaiba’s own tissue will be sturdy enough to keep his airway open.

    By then, Kaiba will be big enough to withstand a slight narrowing of the bronchus, Green said. As a newborn, the bronchus was so narrow that even a slight collapse was enough to completely block air flow.

    About one in 2,200 babies are born with Kaiba’s condition, called tracheobronchomalaci. Most grow out of it by age 2 or 3.

    Now 19 months old, Kaiba is breathing well, although he still has a tracheostomy tube, which allows air into his windpipe, said his mother, April Gionfriddo of Youngstown, Ohio.

    “We’re really relieved and happy that he’s not turning blue anymore,” said Gionfriddo, noting that Kaiba has battled multiple complex health problems, including a hernia, asthma and anatomic defects in several blood vessels. He also underwent surgery to treat hydrocephalus, in which fluid presses on the brain.

    Other surgeons praised the U-M team’s ingenuity.

    “It’s hugely fascinating,” said Sidhu Gangadharan, chief of thoracic surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, who wasn’t involved with Kaiba’s care. “They had a really unique problem, and they came up with a unique solution.”

    Gangadharan said his hospital likely will follow the researchers’ example in custom designing medical devices with 3D printers.

    Because Kaiba’s life was in immediate jeopardy, the Food and Drug Administration gave doctors emergency clearance to produce the device. The 3D printer allowed doctors to design and produce the splint quickly, Hollister said. The printers work somewhat like ink-jet printers. But instead of squirting out layers of ink, the printer lays down layers of biopolymer.

    Doctors are planning a clinical trial to create additional splints for children whose condition isn’t immediately life-threatening.

    The same technology could be used to custom engineer a variety of implants, such as facial bones, Hollister said. He and Green already have built ears and noses, based on patient scans, although these have not yet been transplanted into people.

    Scientists already are using 3D printers to build scaffolds for tissue engineering, with the aim of making blood vessels and other replacement body parts, said Anthony Atala, director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine in North Carolina.
    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
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    Elite Member Chilly Willy's Avatar
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    I really, really want to own this thing.
    Hello mother fucker! when you ask a question read also the answer instead of asking another question on an answer who already contain the answer of your next question!
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    Elite Member OrangeSlice's Avatar
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    Even more 3D printer coolness:

    NASA awards grant for 3-D food printer; could it end world hunger?



    By Eric Pfeiffer, Yahoo! News | The Sideshow – Tue, May 21, 2013








    Some 3-D printer food made from meal worms (TNO research)
    Call it food for thought. Or perhaps thought for food: NASA has given a six-month grant to a company developing what could be the world’s first 3-D food printer. And the project’s developer, reports Quartz, an online digital news site, believes the invention could be used to end world hunger.
    Quartz explains that the printer is the brainchild of mechanical engineer Anjan Contractor. Being developed by Contractor’s company, Systems & Materials Research Corp., it will use proteins, carbohydrates and sugars to create edible food products.
    Contractor says one of his primary motivations is a belief that food will become exponentially more expensive in the near future. The average consumer, he told Quartz, will need a more economically viable option.
    Some alternative food source options that may be used with the printer include algae, duckweed, grass, lupine seeds, beet leaves and even insects, according to TNO Research, which is working with Contractor on the project.
    “I think, and many economists think, that current food systems can’t supply 12 billion people sufficiently,” said Contractor. “So we eventually have to change our perception of what we see as food.”
    One of Contractor’s first prototypes will be a 3-D pizza printer, and he hopes to begin building it over the next couple of weeks. Contractor, reports Quartz, explained that it will print "a layer of dough, which is baked at the same time it’s printed, by a heated plate at the bottom of the printer. Then it lays down a tomato base, 'which is also stored in a powdered form, and then mixed with water and oil.'" Lastly comes the "protein layer."
    Contractor also hopes that people will be able to share recipes via an open source coding system.
    “One of the major advantages of a 3-D printer is that it provides personalized nutrition,” Contractor told Quartz. “If you’re male, female, someone is sick—they all have different dietary needs. If you can program your needs into a 3-D printer, it can print exactly the nutrients that person requires.”
    NASA is certainly a believer: The six-month grant comes to $125,000. The agency specifically interested in using the 3-D printer to feed astronauts on long space voyages.
    “Long distance space travel requires 15-plus years of shelf life,” Contractor said to Quartz. “The way we are working on it is, all the carbs, proteins and macro and micro nutrients are in powder form. We take moisture out, and in that form it will last maybe 30 years.”
    The 3D food printer schematic (SMRC)


    NASA awards grant for 3-D food printer; could it end world hunger?
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    "Schadenfreude, hard to spell, easy to feel." ~VenusinFauxFurs

    "Scoffing is one of my main hobbies!" ~Trixie

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