Page 68 of 174 FirstFirst ... 185864656667686970717278118168 ... LastLast
Results 1,006 to 1,020 of 2602
Like Tree107Likes

Thread: What are you currently reading??

  1. #1006
    Elite Member Penny Lane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Over the hills and far away
    Posts
    21,646

    Default



    For my history course... kind of interesting, but the fact that it's required is a drag.

  2. #1007
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    support histiocytosis awareness
    Posts
    7,363

    Default

    while waiting to buy Fae Fever by Karen Moning I bought the first book in her Highlander series. It sucks, I felt like I was reading a disney teen book.

    I'm beginning to get unlucky in my book picks.

  3. #1008
    Elite Member sophie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Jet settin in NewYork
    Posts
    2,915

    Default

    Fractured by Karin Slaughter-meh!
    "I'll probably just end up in some seedy bar with some seedy blonde"-some random Englishman

  4. #1009
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    236

    Default

    My Sister's Keeper by Jodi Picoult

  5. #1010
    Elite Member MarieAntoinette's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,106

    Default

    I finished Will Self's Dorian: An Imitation. It's a rewriting of The Picture of Dorian Gray set in the 80's and 90's, and much more straight-forward than Wilde's novel. Explicit sex scenes and lots of drug use and an AIDS-riddled Dorian who happily infects other people. I dunno. It was pretty entertaining, but not a match for the original novel.

  6. #1011
    Friend of Gossip Rocks! buttmunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Uranus
    Posts
    31,885

    Default

    Paul Theroux, The Happy Isles of Oceania. Very good travel book, although he is slightly bitter.
    'Those who sacrifice liberty for security deserve neither.' Ben Franklin

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying the cross."
    --Sinclair Lewis

  7. #1012
    Elite Member Mariesoleil's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Canada baby!
    Posts
    6,904

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GaPeach View Post
    while waiting to buy Fae Fever by Karen Moning I bought the first book in her Highlander series. It sucks, I felt like I was reading a disney teen book.

    I'm beginning to get unlucky in my book picks.
    Yeah I didn't like the first one in the Highlander series either. But the others are good. I really liked Faefever but the ending is quite...disturbing.
    "Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counsellors, and the most patient of teachers."

  8. #1013
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    support histiocytosis awareness
    Posts
    7,363

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mariesoleil View Post
    Yeah I didn't like the first one in the Highlander series either. But the others are good. I really liked Faefever but the ending is quite...disturbing.
    I stayed up until 2:30 reading it. OH MY GOSH!!!!!! I want to stalk Moning to find out what happens next!!!
    The ending is gutsy and out there. So what happens will Barrons help her, if so can he help her from being a parya (so whatever it is) Oh my gosh. If she screws up the next book and goes Stephanie Mayer on me I'll cry. Mayer blew her last book (Breaking Dawn) and now I have no desire to read any more of her work.

    FaeFever is so far the best of Monings work (that I've read) She must have been a great player of Dungeons and Dragons ..

    I just got some Vampire Romance books from Hamilton.. waiting for J.R. Ward or Moning to come out with something new.

  9. #1014
    Elite Member Mariesoleil's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Canada baby!
    Posts
    6,904

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GaPeach View Post
    I stayed up until 2:30 reading it. OH MY GOSH!!!!!! I want to stalk Moning to find out what happens next!!!
    The ending is gutsy and out there. So what happens will Barrons help her, if so can he help her from being a parya (so whatever it is) Oh my gosh. If she screws up the next book and goes Stephanie Mayer on me I'll cry. Mayer blew her last book (Breaking Dawn) and now I have no desire to read any more of her work.

    FaeFever is so far the best of Monings work (that I've read) She must have been a great player of Dungeons and Dragons ..

    I just got some Vampire Romance books from Hamilton.. waiting for J.R. Ward or Moning to come out with something new.
    Moning wrote this on her blog a while back:

    Dear Reader:

    When MacKayla Lane first sashayed into my head, pretty in pink, perfectly accessorized right down to her flawless manicure and pedicure, and began speaking to me in a sweet southern drawl, I rolled my eyes and started shopping around for another protagonist. No blushing southern belles for me, thank you. I prefer my heroines strong, smart and self-possessed.

    For a while, MacKayla lurked at the edges of my mind, waving a dainty, embroidered handkerchief that looked like a family heirloom, trying to get my attention. I wouldn't have liked her if I'd met her on the street. I certainly didn't want her in my head for a few years while I told her five-book story, so I ignored her, and heaved a huge sigh of relief when she finally went away.

    Unfortunately, she didn't stay away. She came back, obsessed with vengeance, and she'd changed so much that I didn't recognize her. Gone was the gorgeous, long blond hair, hacked short and dyed black, and her fashionable wardrobe had been replaced by urban grunge. Armed to the teeth, she was covered with blood—and the look in her eyes was pure murder.

    This time, when she began talking, I listened. Her sister had been killed, she told me in tight, clipped tones, and her parents were too grief-stricken to push the case when the Garda closed it, so she'd gone to Dublin to track down the murderer herself.

    But when she got there, she discovered she'd been living a life of lies for the past twenty-two years: that she and her sister were adopted; that they were descended from an ancient, Celtic bloodline of sidhe-seers—people who can see the Fae—and that a war to end all wars was coming, and supposedly she was the only one who could stop it. Little bit of pressure there, she snarled, waving a blood-tipped spear at me, for a sheltered Georgia peach whose greatest accomplishment to date was the launch of a letter-writing campaign against OPI that had gotten them to un-retire her favorite shade of pink polish.

    I laughed and opened my laptop. I haven't stopped being riveted by her story since.

    Like everything else about the Fever series, Mac is study in contrasts. She's soft and pretty and feminine but if you push her she hisses and spits and turns into steel. She loves sunshine, but spends most of her time lately in the rain and dark. She hates small places, and keeps getting trapped in them. She has no desire to be heroic, doesn't think she has it in her, but can't figure out how to abdicate responsibility for the mess the world's in when no one else will take it over for her. (She doesn't get that sometimes, that's all heroism really boils down to—refusing to quit.)

    She's a fighter, she's a dreamer, she's a romantic. She wants her happily ever after, and I desperately want her to have it—which made writing Faefever one of the hardest things I've ever done. I knew where this installment was taking Mac, and it nearly killed us both.

    I wrote Faefever fully aware that Mac was barreling toward her darkest hour, squirming with every page I completed. I've never been so invested, so emotionally connected to a character before—and how ironic, considering Mac began as my antithesis, a woman who'd never suffered any adversity or had to struggle for anything. As some of you may know, a little over four years ago, I was bit by a tick carrying Lyme Disease, but wasn't diagnosed for two and half years, by which time the disease had invaded my central nervous system, affecting my cognitive functions, and nearly crippling me. I went from being a strong, active woman who worked out every day and had boundless energy to sometimes having no more than two or three hours a day that I was able to be productive. Like Mac, my world became something completely different than anything I'd ever known. Like Mac, I had to find new pleasures, learn how to live with new constraints, in new ways.

    And like Mac, I've learned that that which doesn't kill us really does makes us stronger and that, although the darkest hour is before dawn, dawn always comes and when it does, it's sweeter and more beautiful than any dawn preceding it, because life, too, is a study in contrasts, and without the bitter, sweet is just another bland taste on your tongue.

    So, when you read Faefever, dear reader, rest assured that Mac's dawn is just around the corner. I'm a fighter and a dreamer and a romantic myself, and a big believer in happy endings. But the story in the Fever series must be told exactly as it is, precisely as it came to me, and when you get to the end of the series, you'll see that all of it had a purpose and a reason, and that, like all of our lives, Mac's story is stamped at the heart by the grand design of something divine.

    Enjoy!—Karen
    Karen Marie Moning
    "Books are the quietest and most constant of friends; they are the most accessible and wisest of counsellors, and the most patient of teachers."

  10. #1015
    Bronze Member michaelchance's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    151

    Default

    I've been going through a horror phase recently I've just finished reading Amazon.com: Others: James Herbert: Books by James Herbert - which I really enjoyed. I've just started reading Amazon.com: SHRIKE: Joe Donnelly, Steinaer Lund;: Books by Joe Donnelly, which has been ok to good so far but I haven't read enough of it yet to have any real opition about yet. (Other than not giving up in disgust in the first 10-20 pages though, which I do do )

  11. #1016
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    support histiocytosis awareness
    Posts
    7,363

    Default

    Mariesoleil - don't laugh but I joined her myspace and I got a email today.. oh yes I did! OK so I was ranting about her writing some of Dream Fever from JCB's point of view - Mayer just did the same thing with Breaking Dawn with Jacobs point of view. I was like NO!!!

    Her new books was supposed to come out this year but she got sick and Dream Fever won't be coming out until August 2009.. good grief thats a long time to wait when it's a major cliff hanger.

    I'm reading Laurell Hamilitons Guilty Pleasures right now. It's not a easy read but I am liking it so far. I won't be finishing it in one sitting though.

    So far for parnormal romance Fever wins, followed by J.R. Wards brotherhood of the black daggar series, Hamilitons Vampire hunters and then Mayer - Twilight was a good book to bad Breaking Dawn was so bad. -- the movie is getting bad reviews

  12. #1017
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    216

    Default

    One Fifth Avenue: Definitely Candace Bushnell's best book. She is a smart woman but the problem with her writing is she dislikes and looks down on her characters. She means to be funny but it can be depressing. Still, good junk.

    The Stepford Wives: A very quick read. Well thought out. Very good.

    Bright Lights, Big City: The only good book Jay McInerey ever wrote. I read it before but picked it up again. A slice of time (early 80's). Loved it.

  13. #1018
    Elite Member LaFolie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    floating...
    Posts
    6,169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MarieAntoinette View Post
    I finished Will Self's Dorian: An Imitation. It's a rewriting of The Picture of Dorian Gray set in the 80's and 90's, and much more straight-forward than Wilde's novel. Explicit sex scenes and lots of drug use and an AIDS-riddled Dorian who happily infects other people. I dunno. It was pretty entertaining, but not a match for the original novel.
    I've read it and I second your opinion.
    I don't want to perish like a fading horse - best lyric ever

  14. #1019
    Elite Member LaFolie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    floating...
    Posts
    6,169

    Default

    I'm reading Jane Eyre and I can hardly put it down!!
    I don't want to perish like a fading horse - best lyric ever

  15. #1020
    Hit By Ban Bus!
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    support histiocytosis awareness
    Posts
    7,363

    Default

    the 4th book of the Vampire Hunter series by Laurell Hamilton.

    OK I'm slow but I've just realized there is no sex just gore, throats getting ripped out and zombies, vampires and werewolfs oh my.

    There are like 17 books in the series so far and I'm over it at book 4 so I think I'll skip to the last book and see who is still alive.

    Not bad for a girl power book, girl power with no sex

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 2 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 2 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Actress Reading Whedon's Wonder Woman Script
    By AgentOrange in forum Gossip Archive
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 22nd, 2006, 08:52 PM
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: March 13th, 2006, 02:28 PM
  3. Re-reading 'Pompeii'
    By DisruptiveHair in forum Books and Literature
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: October 13th, 2005, 02:47 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •