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Thread: Is there a really classic recent perfume?

  1. #31
    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    The problem with the American market is that it uses Celebrities to sell these products, like at Target. It's been degraded, as to what you're paying for.

    I don't think there is a such thing as a classic, it's mainly about the spokesperson.

  2. #32
    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    ^^Disagree. Perfumes, many of them still around after a long time -- Chanel No. 5 was released in the early 1920s -- were sold without spokespeople on the basis of quality/classy advertising in select markets. I realize things have changed, but the title of the thread refers to classic perfumes, which involve a bit more thought than every starlet's idea of a way to make a quick buck by going into the biz.

  3. #33
    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    I'm so tired to mass marketing. Just don't get it. I know this thread is more about the scent of a fragrance, but it really comes down to having an item that is open to EVERYONE on a massive scale.

    By the way, I'm no fragrance buff, so I'm leaving here.

  4. #34
    A*O
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    There are some cheaper perfumes that have stood the test of time, and are 'classics' in their own way. What about '4711' cologne, Rive Gauche and O de Lancome. What I'm trying to say is that there are very, very few new fragrances (endorsed by celebs or otherwise) that are sufficiently different and unique to remain popular for longer than the advertising campaign.
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  5. #35
    Elite Member sputnik's Avatar
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    ^^^^
    well that's the case for everything, be it music, art, books... only a fraction of what is released will become 'classic', most of it is crap or else only good for a short while upon release.
    I'm open to everything. When you start to criticise the times you live in, your time is over. - Karl Lagerfeld

  6. #36
    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    Years of Fragrance
    by Irene Heiney, Lamas Beauty Correspondent


    Sacred and rare . . . Fragrance made for the gods
    B.C./A.D. – Frankincense & Myrrh. Fragrance is as old as mankind, but let’s start here, with that famous biblical combo. Up till now and for 1000 years to come, fragrance ingredients were limited to aromatic plant resins, woods, spices and herbs. Brought by boat and caravan from the Middle and Far East, these items were precious and costly. They were offered as gifts and tributes to gods, emperors and tyrants (often one and the same). The 3 Wise Men brought gold, frankincense and myrrh. Today, we’d still thrill over the gold but who wants tree sap!

    When knighthood was in fashion . . . so was fragrance
    1100-1300 – The Crusades. Although justified as religious wars for Christians to wrest the Holy Land from Muslim control, the Holy Wars were also great opportunities to hold raiding parties. Spices, bath ointments, and essences brought home from the Crusades started a new industry – the European perfume trade. Centered in Venice and Naples, perfumery flourished there for the next 200 years.


    Distilled to its essence . . . fragrances enters a new world
    1400’s – Distillation. TheArabs discovered distillation --the process of concentrating fragrant essences -- thereby making them vastly easier to ship and a lot less perishable. Around the same time, the distillation of wine was perfected also, which led to the mass production of alcohol or “spirit water” – as healing elixirs. As we’ll see, distillation was to have a major impact on perfumery, in 17th Century Hungary.

    France takes over
    1500’s – France Emerges. Closely linked to the leather industry (because gloves and other items were treated with fragrant oils to clean) and the soap industry in Marseilles, perfumery prospered in the south of France. Grasse had the ideal climate for growing the flowers, herbs and citruses brought originally from India and Persia. Tuberose, jasmin, cloves, and lavender grew wild. Today. these, and many other fragrance products, are still grown and processed in the region. Although methods have improved, the basic processes of distillation, expression, and extraction are still practiced today at Grasse. The pomp and splendor at the French courts of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries advanced perfumery with constant demands for new and unusual scents. Fragrances were also a social necessity since hygiene was still primitive and bathing considered dangerous to the health.

    In Eastern Europe, an intoxicating idea

    1600’s – Hungarian Water. Perhaps the idea came from a clever monk, an old herb woman, or an alchemist in his attic. Whoever it was, he/she combined, for the first time, a rosemary extract with distilled alcohol for stability– and the forerunner of today’s eau de cologne was born.
    From Cologne . . . cologne
    1792 – The First Eau de Cologne. The ancient German city of Cologne is the birthplace of the first true cologne. Stablized with alcohol, a crisp, citrus blend was created, called 4711. An eternally fresh classic that is still worn today by men and women everywhere.

    The Modern Masters Emerge
    1917 – Chypre by Coty. Originally created as an individual fragrance by master perfumer, Rene Coty, this unique blend of moss and spices also came to describe a an entire category of fragrances like it in years to come.

    1921 – Chanel #5. The first perfume that can truly be called modern After World War I, aldehydes, the first aroma chemicals, become available. Clean and ozone-like, aldehydes were unlike anything nature created. The very modern Coco Chanel endorsed them for all time by including them in her famous Chanel # 5. Hundreds of aroma chemicals have followed since Chanel’s innovation, lending excitement, complexity and stability to modern fragrances. Today’s vast array of different scents would be impossible without them.
    1925 – Shalimar. This sensually rich oriental blend by Guerlain became one of the great fragrances of the 20th Century. Its provocative notes instantly take you back to the jazz age and the craze for Rudolph Valentino and the sheiks of Araby. .
    1945 – Vent Vert and L’Air du Temps. After the grim years of World War Two, fragrances from the late forties and early fifties announced the liberation of women from the heavy scents of yesteryear. These two delicate floral essences in particular were forerunners of today’s trend to the fresh, light and natural.
    1952 – Youth Dew. The first concentrated perfume oil. Estee Lauder knew women would respond to it. And they did -- launching her worldwide beauty empire.

    1970’s – The Designers. The 70’s saw American designers come into their own. Fragrance became the vehicle to reach millions of women who didn’t shop in designer departments but loved the idea of having something from Bill Blass, Halston, or Oscar de la Renta. The Euro-designers fought back with Opium by Yves St. Laurent, Chloe by Lagerfeld, Gucci by Gucci, Cardin from Pierre Cardin, and many more.
    1
    980’s – The Blatants.
    As women entered the workforce in droves, Reagan-omics led to power suits and power fragrances. Remember Dynasty? The 80’s gave us Giorgio, Poison, and Obsession ---the essence of the time in a bottle.

    1990’s – The Sheers. Fresh, pretty, light, these fragrances sport unique florals, citruses, and complex fruit and food notes made possible by new technology. Escape and CK1, from Calvin Klein, L’Eau d’Issey, Armani’s Acqua di Gio, Romance by Ralph Lauren, Estee Lauder’s Pleasures, and Pure by Alfred Sung were leaders of the new trend. Too fresh on the scene to be passé any time soon, these are the fragrances many will still be wearing into the 21st century

    2000 AND 1 – What’s ahead? Expect a continuation of sheer delights, but less “transparent,” with headier florals and more complexity.Try the new DKNY, -- it’s ahead of its time.Also look for fragrances with added benefits - non-drying formulas that smooth and soften the skin, and ingredients that improve your mood and well-being. Two to try now are AromaTonic by Lancome that combines a body treatment and fragrance in one and Relaxing from Shiseido that promises to calm and perfume you at the same time. In the next 1000 years, who knows? Perhaps fragrances that renew themselves and stay fresh all day…all week…all year! Or maybe more fragrances will return to their ancient roots to heal and comfort, even beyond the aromatherapy promises of today.

    As adventurous as the 2lst century of fragrance is sure to be, the wonderful pleasures of fragrances past remain eternally alluring, too. The classics that have endured, decade after decade, will also offer something new to the next generation that rediscovers them in the years to come.

    Irene Heiney is a highly-respected new product development consultant to the beauty and fragrance industry. She has developed fragrances for Revlon and many other cosmetic companies worldwide. Her own personal favorite fragrances are Chanel #19 and Fidji.
    Discuss this article with others at The Salon!

    http://www.lamasbeauty.com/beauty/fragrance_history.htm

  7. #37
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
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    There is a Givenchy perfume that's been around for a while. Can't think of the name of it, but I think that perfume has become a classic.

    Also, I really think that Marc Jacobs has the staying power. It's not a "trendy" scent. Not to me anyway.

  8. #38
    Elite Member JamieElizabeth's Avatar
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    A*O are you specualating?

    I agree with KrisNine on the Marc Jacobs. I think he's only made one, and isn't putting another out.

    Note: Marc Jacobs IS a Givenchy product. I just looked at the bottom of the bottle.
    Last edited by JamieElizabeth; August 17th, 2007 at 06:30 PM.

  9. #39
    A*O
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    Yes I am speculating - hence the title of the thread.
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  10. #40
    Elite Member ariesallover's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SweetPea View Post
    Joop for men makes me nuts (in a good way).
    I used to wear that everyday. Might be time to try it again.

  11. #41
    Elite Member Chalet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hellkitty View Post
    Citrus scent: Eau d'Hadrien by Annick Goutal withstands test of time, it's been about 20 years since its release.
    That's mine!

    Quote Originally Posted by McJag View Post
    You got Chanel No. 19 at FOURTEEN? *runs to phone to call Mom & complain bitterly*
    I had it then as well but Mom gave me hers. Light and refreshing for a young girl as I remember it.

    Guerlain makes a scent called Jicky which is supposed be a classic and sexy scent for the adventurous coquette back in the late 1800's. I tried it. Not for me.

    Guerlain updated Shalimar with Shalimar Legere in 2003.


    Shalimar Eau Légère
    Imagine sitting by the pool somewhere in the middle of a luxurious Middle Eastern palace and eating lemon-jasmine sorbet. The wind is carrying the scent of blooming orange groves and a whiff of perfumed silks from the palace. Unlike traditional Shalimar, Eau Légère, introduced in 2003, skips the musky accord and goes from the cool lemon top into a warm vanilla heart. It was created by Mathilde Laurent, a young in-house Guerlain perfumer, however in 2004, Jean Paul Guerlain slightly changed the composition.

    As for Shalimar Light, I would not compare it to the original Shalimar, because the composition is rather different. Shalimar is the full blown fin de siècle decadence, resplendent in its radiance. Shalimar light is like a reflection on all of this glow onto the water. It is still an ornate Guerlain composition, but far more restrained. It is lighter as the name suggests and less complex. Nevertheless, it is a splendid take on the beautiful classic Shalimar. Eau Légère, on the other hand, is effervescent and lighthearted, yet preserving the seductive quality of the original. If it loses in complexity, it surely gains in wearability for me.




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  12. #42
    Elite Member Dixie Normos's Avatar
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    Scents I believe will last:

    D&G either Feminine or Light Blue (which ever one the green/spicy smelling one is)
    EL Cinnabar (I had requests for it daily)
    "In the face of the blinding sun, I wake only to find
    that Heaven is a stranger place than than one I've left behind." - SM

  13. #43
    Elite Member HelpMeRhonda's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A*O View Post
    Aromatics by Clinique could be a contender. It's been around for a while and is still very popular. It's pretty unique. That's another problem with so many perfumes these days, they all smell exactly the same (to me anyway). I guess there are only so many combinations possible.
    MY FAVE! I have worn that since high school. I always get compliments on it..and rarely ever smell it on other people, which I like.. don't wanna smell like everyone else.

    A gf went out and bought it in HS and that pissed me off!

  14. #44
    Elite Member Just Kill Me's Avatar
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    Issey Miyake! Also love Givenchy Amarige, Armarige marriage, and Angel... a little goes a long way with these ones... when I wear them I put them on first thing out of the shower and give them plenty of time to mellow out.

    To Aromatics I say NOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!! My mother would wear this and it seriously made me gag.

  15. #45
    Elite Member HelpMeRhonda's Avatar
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    Old women have bought a shit load of Jean Nate' for years.. however you spell it.. they freaking love that stuff.. it makes me wanna vomit.

    And Shalimar.. they like that too.

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