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Thread: Cancer and cosmetics

  1. #31
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    It seems to me, that given a particular genetic propensity for developing cancer, it is far more likely that one would get it sooner rather than later from eating poorly, or being overweight instead of from trace trace trace amounts of substances found in cosmetics.

    I don't think a single case of cancer in humans has ever been reported to be from cosmetic use, and I have scoured the literature for such cases.

    I don't think such chemicals are completely innocent, they are tested in massive quantities compared to what people use and they can do harm in such cases. But normal exposures in humans are orders of magnitude lower.

    I think the real reason to avoid cosmetics or personal care products is that they are generally unnecessary and their production, packaging, transport, advertising, and manufacture all puts a tremendous and needless burden on the planet. And I strongly suspect that this is the real motivation behind EWG's scare tactics.

    In short, I don't agree with the cancer-causing meme, but I do think we should stop trashing the planet, and I tend to use as little as possible. But to spend $9 on the "eco-friendly chemical-free" shampoo that is just as loaded with synthetics but with a more clever marketing ploy than the $0.99 bottle of white rain is missing the point. The point being we should use a lot less. Of everything.

  2. #32
    Elite Member Rica's Avatar
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    ^ its what they put in the cosmetics that causes the cancer

  3. #33
    La vie en rose DitaPage*'s Avatar
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    This is so scary.But I hate the idea of having to live so afraid of everything. The internet probably causes cancer too. I went to a seminar once about it and we left with 4 pages of things to avoid; microwaves, smarties (the chocolate) red jelly beans (don't ask me why 'red'), toothpaste, hair spray, watching too much TV, cell phones, the list just went on and on and frightened a ton of people. Sometimes ignorance truly is bliss.

    Theres no definite cause yet. Until there is, I'm not getting worked up over it.
    Last edited by DitaPage*; December 26th, 2008 at 12:34 AM.

  4. #34
    Elite Member Palermo's Avatar
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    You wouldn't feel this way if you had lost several people to cancer. Here's one example, the first thing I googled:

    Chemical Fact Sheet: Parabens - The Breast Cancer Fund

  5. #35
    La vie en rose DitaPage*'s Avatar
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    I'm sorry for your losses Palermo, I don't mean to sound insensitive, but its just my opinion that I'm not going to live terrified of everything. The cosmetics and chemicals is one thing, but there's just as great a risk of getting it from food, cell phone use, computers, tvs, microwaves. The fact that cancer wasn't as prevalent when alot of todays technologies weren't around must mean something. The stress that goes with worrying about it can even bring it on. And everyone's body is different; one thing will harm one, and do nothing to another. I can type 'what causes cancer' into google now and there'll be a few million sites.

    What interests me is if all these studies prove that things cause cancer, why aren't these products taken off the market? Every time someone has told me about make up causing cancer, in the next sentence they're trying to sell me something else. In that case, we should use nothing. No makeup, shampoos or deodorants, and hair dye was never NECESSARY. If these things cause cancer, it looks like we pay a price for vanity after all. Its all man made products, of course they're all fucked up. Makes me want to throw everything away.
    Last edited by DitaPage*; December 26th, 2008 at 12:59 AM.

  6. #36
    Gold Member Pippin69's Avatar
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    I use a lot of Tom's products, including the whitening toothpaste, it does make your teeth whiter!
    "Just because I walked into a turd supermarket doesn't mean I have to buy anything." - John Oliver

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Palermo View Post
    You wouldn't feel this way if you had lost several people to cancer.
    In fact I did lose my mother to breast cancer, she was younger than me when she was diagnosed.


    Here's one example, the first thing I googled:

    Chemical Fact Sheet: Parabens - The Breast Cancer Fund
    You want good info, you have to go directly pubmed and not rely on second or third party propaganda.

    Bull Cancer. 2008 Sep;95(9):871-80.
    [The use of deodorants/antiperspirants does not constitute a risk factor for breast cancer]

    [Article in French]

    Namer M, Luporsi E, Gligorov J, Lokiec F, Spielmann M.
    Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice, France.
    Based on the observation of a high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant adjacent to the usual area of application of deodorants and/or antiperspirants, several scientific teams have advanced the hypothesis of a possible link between antiperspirants and breast cancer. The possibility of the involvement of parabens and aluminium salts, traditional components of a number of cosmetic products, has been advanced by the same teams. In order to ascertain whether this hypothesis could or could not be confirmed, a group of clinical experts in oncology was set up to search and analyse the literature data relating to the problem raised with the aim of answering three predefined questions: 1) does it exist experimental or biological arguments supporting a potential link between the use of deodorants/antiperspirants and breast cancer? 2) Does the use of deodorants/antiperspirants have any effect on the increase in the risk of breast cancer? 3) Could a causal relationship between the use of deodorants/antiperspirants and breast cancer be accepted? The scientific data were searched systematically in the PubMed database (PubMed Home) using standardised search equations. Fifty-nine studies resulting from the literature search were reviewed and nineteen articles with various methodologies were selected for in-depth analysis. In view of the fact that parabens are generally not present in deodorants/antiperspirants, the reflection group's search related purely to the question of aluminium salts. Among these nineteen articles, many are methodologically unsound, do not answer to the questions posed or deal with the question of parabens and were therefore discarded by the reflection group. The expert group's conclusion coincides with those of the French, European and American health authorities. After analysis of the available literature on the subject, no scientific evidence to support the hypothesis was identified and no validated hypothesis appears likely to open the way to interesting avenues of research.
    PMID: 18829420 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE

    Crit Rev Toxicol. 2005 Jun;35(5):435-58.

    A review of the endocrine activity of parabens and implications for potential risks to human health.

    Golden R, Gandy J, Vollmer G.

    ToxLogic LC, Potomac, Maryland 20854, USA. RGolden124@aol.com

    Parabens are a group of the alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid and typically include methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, butylparaben, isobutylparaben, isopropylparaben, and benzylparaben. Parabens (or their salts) are widely used as preservatives in cosmetics, toiletries, and pharmaceuticals due to their relatively low toxicity profile and a long history of safe use. Testing of parabens has revealed to varying degrees that individual paraben compounds have weakly estrogenic activity in some in vitro screening tests, such as ligand binding to the estrogen receptor, regulation of CAT gene expression, and proliferation of MCF-7 cells. Reported in vivo effects include increased uterine weight (i.e., butyl-, isobutyl-, and benzylparaben) and male reproductive-tract effects (i.e., butyl- and propylparaben). However, in relation to estrogen as a control during in vivo studies, the parabens with activity are many orders of magnitude less active than estrogen. While exposure to sufficient doses of exogenous estrogen can increase the risk of certain adverse effects, the presumption that similar risks might also result from exposure to endocrine-active chemicals (EACs) with far weaker activity is still speculative. In assessing the likelihood that exposure to weakly active EACs might be etiologically associated with adverse effects due to an endocrine-mediated mode of action, it is paramount to consider both the doses and the potency of such compounds in comparison with estrogen. In this review, a comparative approach involving both dose and potency is used to assess whether in utero or adult exposure to parabens might be associated with adverse effects mediated via an estrogen-modulating mode of action. In utilizing this approach, the paraben doses required to produce estrogenic effects in vivo are compared with the doses of either 17beta-estradiol or diethylstilbestrol (DES) that are well established in their ability to affect endocrine activity. Where possible and appropriate, emphasis is placed on direct comparisons with human data with either 17beta-estradiol or DES, since this does not require extrapolation from animal data with the uncertainties inherent in such comparisons. Based on these comparisons using worst-case assumptions pertaining to total daily exposures to parabens and dose/potency comparisons with both human and animal no-observed-effect levels (NOELs) and lowest-observed-effect levels (LOELs) for estrogen or DES, it is biologically implausible that parabens could increase the risk of any estrogen-mediated endpoint, including effects on the male reproductive tract or breast cancer. Additional analysis based on the concept of a hygiene-based margin of safety (HBMOS), a comparative approach for assessing the estrogen activities of weakly active EACs, demonstrates that worst-case daily exposure to parabens would present substantially less risk relative to exposure to naturally occurring EACs in the diet such as the phytoestrogen daidzein.

    Publication Types:
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    PMID: 16097138 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  8. #38
    Elite Member ariesallover's Avatar
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    What is one person's propaganda is another's gospel. What constitutes bias for one person can easily indicate objective credentials to another.

    Just as I'm a consumer of potentially harmful but fun goods, I'm also a consumer of research; with both, I make the decisions that I think I can live with.

    But I'm also one of those people who made a change in my cell phone type and usage because I want to do something I think is helpful and healthy for me.

    Because of my illness, I take toxins to kill off my white cells, and some of these drugs flat-out tell you on the label they're carcinogenic lol. Hard choices, but all ultimately my choice, and that has made me painfully aware that I can - to some degree - control what's in my environment and how I interact with it (yeah I also changed habits around the microwave - I'm one of *those* people too).

    I've noticed that small choices I've made about what I come into contact with can make my illness symptoms better or worse and can make my body's reaction to my drugs better or worse. Because of that, from shampoo to makeup, I've made changes in products and habits over the past decade that work for me. That's really the only indicator for folks: whether it actually works for them. I think for some people, the worry over this stuff will literally do them in, so it's not worth it for them because of their mental health. For other folks like me, I wind up feeling empowered and more energized through moves like the ones I've described, even though my genetics clearly have me damned already.
    "I ransacked his drawers when he left me by myself at his place for the first time. That's how we did it in the good old days. Tells me all I need to know about him. He pretends he didn't notice. That's how good relationships start." - Chilly Willy

  9. #39
    Elite Member qwerty's Avatar
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    Aries, I really like this company's skin care and soap products:

    All Natural, Handmade Soap, Natural Skin Care, Lavender, Rhassoul, Shea Butter, DayBreak Lavender Farm

    Most of their products are all natural and organic and made on site. I've been impressed with most of their skincare products.

    I'm still looking for all natural cosmetics.

  10. #40
    Elite Member ariesallover's Avatar
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    ^Thank you, I'll check it out.
    "I ransacked his drawers when he left me by myself at his place for the first time. That's how we did it in the good old days. Tells me all I need to know about him. He pretends he didn't notice. That's how good relationships start." - Chilly Willy

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