Results 1 to 12 of 12
Like Tree8Likes
  • 1 Post By sprynkles
  • 3 Post By Waterslide
  • 1 Post By Nevan
  • 1 Post By HeartShapedBox
  • 1 Post By czb
  • 1 Post By Chalet

Thread: Is Retin-A Toxic? Why I Stopped Using Retin-A

  1. #1
    Elite Member sprynkles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    At the salon
    Posts
    22,725

    Default Is Retin-A Toxic? Why I Stopped Using Retin-A



    It might do more harm than good.
    Michelle Villett Updated:Jan 25, 2019 Original:Jul 20, 2016

    More than three years ago, I wrote a widely-shared article about all the benefits of Retin-A.
    It can plump up your skin; fight wrinkles, sun damage and acne; and get rid of clogged comedones.
    I still don't disagree with any of that. Except I no longer use Retin-A myself.
    Today, I'm going to explain why, because you might want to re-think it, too...


    1. Retin-A Interferes With Your Body's Ability To Use Vitamin A

    I've always argued that vitamin A is the single most important nutrient for skin health.

    But using Retin-A and other prescription topical retinoids (Stieva-A, Tazorac, Renova, Differin, etc.) isn't the same as eating foods rich in vitamin A, such as liver. When we ingest vitamin A, it has to be converted by our enzymes into its active form, retinoic acid. But Retin-A, or tretinoin, is already retinoic acid, and it binds to our retinoid receptors to elicit various responses in the skin.

    "Vitamin A is such a basic metabolic factor, in the brain and endocrine glands, liver and kidneys, etc., I think it's dangerous to experiment with drugs that interfere with it," says Ray Peat, PhD.

    Our bodies need vitamin A for so many functions, including progesterone synthesis, protein synthesis and cell differentiation. Ironically, those things are all critical for long-term skin health, so perhaps the longer you're on Retin-A, the worse your skin could get?!


    2. Retin-A is Associated with Increased Mortality

    Shocking but true: a clinical trial comparing 0.1% tretinoin cream to placebo was stopped six months before it was supposed to end, because of the unanticipated high number of deaths in the tretinoin group.

    Although the deaths were statistically significant, the researchers buried the study for four years; when it was finally published, the deaths were attributed to "chance." Maybe the fact that the lead investigator received financial support from Johnson & Johnson, a manufacturer of tretinoin, had something to do with it?

    Although the FDA and Health Canada have remained silent, the Archives of Dermatology editorial at least suggested that medical practitioners "may wish to discuss the results of the [study] with all patients using topical tretinoin."

    I don't know about you, but an increased risk of death from a mere skincare product is something I'd want to know about! I doubt I'd have touched Retin-A if I was made aware of this.



    3. Retin-A Causes Irritation and Inflammation

    We all know Retin-A is irritating. So much so that I wrote an entire article about how to deal with the redness and flakiness. With the right regimen and application strategies, some people, usually with hardier skin types, find a way to manage it. Others, including me, just don't.

    I tried, I really did, but now that I'm off Retin-A, I have to admit that my skin looks and feels much better. It's no longer dry, irritated, red, sensitive, crepey under the eyes, or darker than the rest of my body. Plus, I've discovered far better ways to address the premenstrual breakouts it was helping with (more on that in a sec!), so there really wasn't any point in using it.

    "But isn't Retin-A the gold standard for anti-aging?" I hear you asking. I used to think so, but now I'm not so sure. I suspect its mild plumping effect is because of the irritation and subsequent inflammation. (That's also the mechanism behind those "miraculous" oxygen facials, by the way.) So it appears to be getting rid of wrinkles and making you look younger, but it might only be a temporary swelling. Once you stop using Retin-A, your skin returns to normal—but because inflammation is linked to premature aging, you might actually be worse off.


    4. Glycolic Acid is Just as Effective

    One of the reasons I persisted for so long with Retin-A, trying to make it work for me, is because I thought I was letting my skin down (and inviting scary future aging!) if I didn't. I can't even tell you how many dermatologists have praised it over the years, during the dozens and dozens of interviews I've conducted as a magazine beauty writer.

    But then I found out about Dr. Neal Schultz. He doesn't even prescribe Retin-A anymore. "The reason that I moved to glycolics is the side effects from retinoids. They can lead to discolouration, irritation, flaking and even soreness." He adds, "The two most effective chemical exfoliants are glycolic and tretinoin. But glycolic is the gold standard. Glycolic, when properly formulated, is gentle. It does virtually everything for anti-aging that tretinoin does."

    Voilà, no more reason to feel like you should be using Retin-A. Go forth and acid tone, my friend!

    https://theskincareedit.com/2016/07/21/retin-a-toxic
    rollo likes this.

    "A massive penis means never having to say you're sorry". Mo

  2. #2
    Elite Member Waterslide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    out where the buses don't run
    Posts
    21,910

    Default

    I tried using Retin-A way back in the day (apologies for the unintentional rhyme there) and it pretty much burned my skin off so that was that. But causing death??? I'd rather just be a little wrinkled.
    Brookie, Kittylady and rollo like this.
    "AND WHEN YOU BECAME DENISE, I TOLD ALL YOUR COLLEAGUES, THOSE CLOWN COMICS, TO FIX THEIR HEARTS OR DIE."

  3. #3
    czb
    czb is online now
    Elite Member czb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    16,437

    Default

    don't know about that but it is in teratogenic class of drugs. i was taken off it when i was prego and after i delivered, my medi derm kept me off it. she thought it was too toxic. but when i was on it, it definitely worked. haven't been on it for 11+ years.

  4. #4
    Elite Member Brookie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In the "D"
    Posts
    24,288

    Default

    When I was in my 20s and 30s, I had acne and went to a derm for years. Retin A and yeah my skin usually looked sunburned. It DID, however, do the job. Everything now that used to work great is toxic, it seems.
    Life is short. Break the Rules. Forgive Quickly. Kiss Slowly. Love Truly.
    Laugh Uncontrollably. And never regret ANYTHING that makes you smile.

    - Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Elite Member MohandasKGanja's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Wherever my kids are
    Posts
    31,729

    Default

    I used it as a teen. My only memory was that it didn't work very well.

  6. #6
    Elite Member Nevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    5,678

    Default

    My mom uses skincare that has retinol (is that the same thing?) in it. I tried it twice and it felt like someone was trying to tear my skin off ... my skin is just way too sensitive for that stuff.
    rollo likes this.
    "No. I love my grudges. I tend to them like little pets." -Madeline Martha Mackenzie

    Spirituality is not religion. Religion divides people. Belief in something unites them.

    Don't tell me not to worry ... worrying is what I do best!


  7. #7
    Elite Member HeartShapedBox's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    2,966

    Default

    Retinol is a derivative of Vitamin A. It's sold over the counter as with Retin A you need a Rx. Retinol is not as strong as Retin A. It's in many moisturizing creams. It's supposed to be less harsh , yet many people can't tolerate it.

    As far as it being toxic, what isn't toxic???? Even our clothes are toxic. Almost everything is. I bought a small table from Wayfair and noticed there was a Proposition 65 warning in the description. I didn't even know what that was until doing some research. Then I noticed almost everything on their website has that warning. Not every company has to put a warning on their products, but so many every day products are toxic. ( including family members and co workers !) Sorry to go off topic here but I did recently see a YouTube video of a lady warning everyone about Retin A. I'm still going to continue to use it and go have a bowl of my toxic shredded wheat.
    Brookie likes this.

  8. #8
    Elite Member Daphne's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    3,619

    Default

    Retin-A can be a miracle product, but you have to be careful with it. I had always given up on it after a few tries because it made my skin so red and dry. This past 6 months, though, it has been very successful for me. I slowly worked myself up to every other day of use on the lowest dosage, and I only put it on OVER a moisturizer containing ceramides and hyaluronic acid. I also use a sunscreen with 12% zinc during the day. My skin looks great, especially my forehead where I was starting to get fine lines and had slight melasma.

  9. #9
    czb
    czb is online now
    Elite Member czb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    left coast
    Posts
    16,437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HeartShapedBox View Post
    ...
    As far as it being toxic, what isn't toxic???? ....
    there's toxic and then there's teratogenic. BIG difference. there's a good reason to discontinue use during pregnancy. if i hadn't gone off it during that time, maybe i'd still be on it. i don't advise against it unless the woman is pregnant.

    prop 65 is a diff animal.
    HeartShapedBox likes this.

  10. #10
    Elite Member KrisNine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Sleepy night night land
    Posts
    23,579

    Default

    Prop 65 is posted everywhere you go in California. Everywhere. Starbucks, Target, etc.

    I never realized how many things were considered toxic until I had a kid. I remember buying sheets for her crib when I was pregnant. All the sheets came with these warnings. Same with pajamas. I noticed it because a pair of little footie pajamas had a tag that said they were supposed to fit snugly because they weren't treated with flame retardant, or something along those lines.

  11. #11
    Elite Member rollo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    47,183

    Default

    I never understood the craze for Retin-A. You only had to look at Farah Fawcett's face (for example) to see she was beginnning to look like a burns victim.
    I have some famous friends and I have mostly not famous friends.

  12. #12
    Elite Member Chalet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    15,012

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by czb View Post
    don't know about that but it is in teratogenic class of drugs. i was taken off it when i was prego and after i delivered, my medi derm kept me off it. she thought it was too toxic. but when i was on it, it definitely worked. haven't been on it for 11+ years.
    Your kiddles are in strollers, so just stop saying 11 years...
    czb likes this.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: January 14th, 2011, 04:42 PM
  2. The most toxic toys
    By celeb_2006 in forum News
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 20th, 2008, 04:51 PM
  3. Toxic wife syndrome
    By twitchy in forum Miscellaneous
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: March 27th, 2007, 12:14 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •