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Thread: Getting a rash after sun exposure

  1. #1
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Getting a rash after sun exposure

    Does this happen to anyone else?

    My arms esp are very sensitive to the sun and get red and itchy with some tiny little bumps.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    A*O
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    Nag nag - do you use SPF30+ sunblock applied at least 20mins before exposure to the sun or even on cloudy days during the summer? Or if you do, you may be allergic to it. Some kinds of birth control Pills and medication can make you sensitive to sunlight too.
    How can you trust anything that bleeds for 3 days every month but doesn't die?

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    I still get itchy either way. I've even tried SPF 50! But thank god it doesn't get all that bad on my face. It's mostly just my arms.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    A*O
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    You probably have to blame your pale Japanese skin. Some people are not destined to have a suntan - cover up and pretend you are Nicole Kidman!
    How can you trust anything that bleeds for 3 days every month but doesn't die?

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    Gold Member birdmadgirl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    I break out after being in the sun, too. I guess it's a good thing I think tans are tacky.

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    Mine is almost like an allergic reaction. What should I use to calm the itching?

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    Super Moderator NoDayButToday's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    You could try cortisone cream, it's an anti-inflammatory (pretty sure I spelled that wrong...). You can get it in any drugstore for pretty cheap.

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    Zee
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    I get this in the spring. It always itches like the devil. Try using either caladryl or take a benadryl tablet.

    My youngest also gets this on his face and limbs. He usually gets relief in a colloidal oatmeal bath. I hate cleaning the tub after that mess.

    Good luck finding some relief!
    Drive a car, drive a boat, drive a plane. What does it matter? As long as I'm drunk!
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    It's a heat rash and will continue to get worse due to more sun exposure. I get them every year. I tend to get mine on my thighs, butt and especially on the backs of my arms. I get them every year and it itches like heck.

    don't put lotion on them and take cooler baths. Moisture will make it worse so lotion is a no-no (I read this at health.com). I do know when I was tanning I broke out in the rash but after tanning for a few weeks my body got used to it and stopped breaking out.

    anyways, I feel like I have leprosy at the moment and my brown as a nut daughter has started breaking out in the same areas. Benadryl doesn't seem to help w/the itching for me. I hope you get to feeling better.

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    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    thanks for the info. I didn't know it was called heat rash (well, duh! )

    I had never had it growing up but started getting it in recent years (maybe my skin is more sensitive now that I'm older...)

    I was out in the sun for a long time Sunday but I haven't been out much since so it's gotten better now. I thought about putting some lotion on but I won't. Thanks for the tip.

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

  11. #11
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    Did some online research

    Miliaria (miliaria rubra, sweat rash or prickly heat) is a skin disease marked by small and itchy rashes. Miliaria is a common condition in hot and humid conditions, such as in the tropics and during the summer season. Although it affects people of all ages, it is especially common in children and infants due to their underdeveloped sweat glands.

    Reason for occurring

    Miliaria (Prickly Heat) occurs when the sweat gland ducts get plugged with dead skin cells and bacteria such as Staphylococcus epidermidis, a common bacteria that occurs on the skin which is also associated with acne. The trapped sweat leads to irritation (prickling), itching and to a rash of very small blisters, usually in a localised area of the skin.

    Clinical Features

    Symptoms of miliaria include small red rashes, called papules, which may itch or more often cause an intense 'pins-and-needles' prickling sensation. These rashes may simultaneously occur at a number of areas on a sufferer's body, the most common including the face, neck, under the breasts and under the scrotum. Other areas include skin folds, areas of the body that may rub against clothing, such as the back, chest, and stomach, etc.

    Once triggered, an attack of miliaria commonly lasts 5-6 weeks because the plugs which form in the sweat duct openings can only be cast off by the outward growth of the sweat duct cells. This takes several weeks. Treatment cannot influence this process but may be used to relieve symptoms.

    Other types of Miliaria

    In a similar mild condition called miliaria crystalina, instead of small rashes, there are tiny blisters that look like beads of perspiration. In miliaria profunda, a severe form of miliaria caused by a complication due to repeated outbreaks of miliaria rubra, the sweat ducts are completely blocked. This inability to sweat may cause the patient to be prone to heat exhaustion.

    Prevention

    Prickly heat can be prevented by avoiding activities that induce sweating, using air conditioning to cool the environment, wearing light clothing and in general, avoiding hot and humid weather. If that is not possible, and especially if air conditioning is unavailable or unaffordable, then taking multiple showers throughout the day (and night as well if needed) to unplug and clean the sweat glands is the best defence against it.
    [edit]

    Treatment

    There is currently little in the way of specific medical treatment, but in most cases the rashes disappear by themselves within several weeks. Staying in an air-conditioned environment to avoid sweating will speed-up the healing process and lessen symptoms. Anti-itch lotions, such as calamine and topical steroid creams can be used to sooth and control the itching. Oil based products slows the defoliation process and should be avoided. Antibiotics and topical antiseptics are used to prevent bacterial blooms, reducing the chances of the sweat glands being plugged and causing inflamations. In some cases, vitamin A and C supplements can help shorten the duration and severity of the symptoms. Prickly heat powders, using antibacterial agents and ingredients like menthol and camphor with mild analgesic and cooling properties, can be applied to the affected areas to relieve the itching and discomfort. Healing takes time even when bacteria are reduced as new sweat gland cells need time to regrow as the damaged cells defoliate.

    Instead of medicating, it is usually best to simply keep the skin clean by taking multiple showers to keep affected areas clean and sweat free. Mild antibacterial soaps may be helpful as well to slow spread and prevent future outbreaks. In most cases, these simple steps alone will make the rashes disappear naturally in a few days. If they persist, it may be advisable to consult a doctor in case a more serious infection is occurring.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_rash
    Prickly Heat (Miliaria Rubra) is a skin disorder which produces an irritating skin rash as the result of obstructed sweat-glands. The prickly heat rash is non-inflammatory and affects people of all ages, though it is most commonly suffered by infants. For those who are genetically predisposed to prickly heat, recurrence is common.

    SYMPTOMS

    Small, fluid-filled blisters on the skin.

    Red, irritating or itchy rash.

    Clusters of blisters which come and go during exposure to sunlight or humid, hot weather.

    Irritation to areas where perspiration is heavy.

    Diaper rash.

    Red, bumpy rash on areas of skin which are covered by clothing.

    CAUSES

    Prickly heat appears when the sweat-gland ducts become obstructed.

    Poor hygiene.

    Hot, humid weather.

    Obesity.

    Genetically inherited.

    Over activity during hot weather.

    Wearing polyester or lycra while exercising in warm weather.

    Allergies to deodorants or antiperspirants.

    REATMENTS

    Prickly heat is curable. A combination of preventative measures and immediate treatment ensure quick recovery.

    STEROID creams and ointments containing hydrocortisone should be applied 3-times daily to rash to relieve itching and irritation.

    COOL showers or baths will help to keep itching under control and cleanse the skin.

    BATHING in oatmeal mixes or with oatmeal soaps will stop itching and speed healing.

    EXPOSE the rash to as much fresh air as possible. Never cover with bandages or tight clothing.

    DRAWING ointments will aid in cleaning out areas which have blistered.

    ANTI-ITCH medications, such as Benadryl, are helpful for those suffering chronic prickly heat.

    ALOE VERA lotions will stop excessive itching.

    PREVENTION

    Prickly heat can often be prevented. If you're especially vulnerable to prickly heat, there are steps you can take to prevent flare-ups.

    CHANGE infant's diapers as soon as they are wet.

    AVOID exposure to heavy sunlight.

    TAKE frequent showers or sponge baths during inclimate weather.

    DECREASE activity during humid, warm weather.

    DON'T wear tight clothing. Cotton clothing will allow the skin to breathe.

    APPLY moisturizing or lubricating ointments to the skin daily.

    USE powders containing cornstarch, which will help to absorb perspiration.

    TAKE multi-vitamin supplements daily to keep the immune system functioning and bacteria at bay.

    http://ky.essortment.com/pricklyheatras_rzqy.htm

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

  12. #12
    Silver Member saimamom's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    Yes...I've gotten this since i was a kid and always knew it was a heat rash. But never knew why it happened. It's on my arms also, especially forearms. Very itchy. I just stay out of the sun.

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    Hit By Ban Bus! pacific breeze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    I've got heat rash on my upper arms and the back of my neck. Sun block didn't prevent it. I think when you are exposed to intense heat for a long period of time, it just happens.

  14. #14
    Elite Member moomies's Avatar
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    Default Re: Getting a rash after sun exposure

    I've got it again since I was in the sun today. I was wearing sun screen but didn't help. My arms are so itchy, it's making me go insane . I'm gonna go wash them in cold water...

    If you think it's crazy, you ain't seen a thing. Just wait until we're goin down in flames.

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    What you have been describing sounds exactly like what I have experienced for the past 5 years.
    At first, the doctors told me it was a reaction between my meds and UV rays in my skin, but I continued to get the rash even after I stopped taking any kind of medication.
    You should go to a doctor, specifically a dermatologist to find out for sure, but it is likely that you have polymorphous light eruption (PMLE).
    You can just google search PMLE if you want more info, theres a wikipedia page, etc.
    Due to it being an allergic reaction, the best course of treating it I have found is antihistamine (I take Benadryl in pill form, as well as use the topical ointment).
    Hope this helps, and good luck!

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